AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When playing dvd movies through the coaxial connection into the processor do all dvd players sound the same? Or does it only make a difference when ur playing it through the analog section. I only use my dvd player for 100% movies. I want it to sound and look as good as possible, if playing through coaxial connection on all playes sound the same then i just mneed to find the one that looks best to me.




steven
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,483 Posts
They do not all sound the same. It depends on the amount of digital clocking errors sent through the digital interface into the receiver or pre-amp's processor.


Better built units sometimes send out cleaner digital signals with fewer errors.


YMMV.


Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i thought i saw a post from stacy spears saying he's seen 60 players and they all look different in video but from the coaxial audio out to the processor they all sounded the same. Am i wrong? If i'm misquoting i apologize.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Dan may well be right about that, but I think he'd agree that even these digital clocking errors (if they indeed occur) would have little effect on perceived sound.


Significant errors would likely cause complete dropouts, anyway, so if you aren't hearing dropouts, you're probably hearing everything. I'm in the "bits is bits" crowd, so it only makes sense to me that a digital bitstream that is decoded externally is either 100% right or 100% wrong.


There are no degrees of "good" or bad."


The DD/AC3 standard includes provisions for error detection/correction/concealment. The first decode stage is an error check, which likely uses a number of check bits to verify the integrity of each data word, with at least single error correction in most implementations. The final decode stage applies overlap/add error concealment if necessary, generally using the last known good data block in an irrecoverable error condition, with muting as a last resort.


Keep in mind this refers to data errors, not clocking errors, but depending on how DD is transferred and decoded, I would expect this to be a non-issue. With CD audio/PCM over SPDIF, the timing of the samples can have audible effects, especially if that data is not bufferred and reclocked by the D/A converter. A compressed/encoded data format such as DD is likely buffered at both ends, with clocking information stripped from the decoded data, and the decoded samples reclocked, so any jitter would have to be introduced by the decoder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
A final thought: the first time I took a look at The Perfect Vision's DVD roundup that gets linked to quite often around here, I got a very good laugh out of the following line, referring to the RP56:

Quote:
As terrific as the picture is, the digital sound quality suffers from the optical-only output, which makes for a somewhat glassy, if dynamic, sonic presentation.
:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,340 Posts
Tells you alot about "The Perfect Vision"


PS: I just showed this quote to our fiber optic design engineers. I think they peed in their pants laughing :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As per stacy "I have had over 60 DVD players, including the 999 and they all sound the same on DD and DTS through the SPDIF output. "





steven
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top