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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just won a bid on a G1000 D-ILA projector to replace my Sony 1272. I'm going to pick it up in a few weeks, and I'm starting to think about what deinterlacer to use with it. I currently have an old Iscan (original model) which does just great with my Sony 1272 7" CRT projector. But the G1000 with its 1365x1024 native resolution seems to cry out for something more than the 480p that the Iscan puts out. The obvious choice for budget minded folks like me is the Quadscan Pro B-stocks here at AVS for $500.


Normally I would wait and try the projector with my DVDO Iscan, and then decide whether to upgrade to the Quadscan. But in this case the Quadscans are going fast and may not be around when I get the projector set up, so I'm seeking advice.


My inclination is to just stay with the DVDO. I know it is compatible with my sources, and I've got it set up with an outboard brightness/contrast/tint control that dials it in nicely. It's a known quantity and does great deinterlacing. The only problem is that it doesn't put out the 1024p that the D-ILA thrives on. I've heard reports from some others though that say the scaling of the G1000 isn't that bad, and the DVDO is viable.


The Quadscan would certainly put out the right 1024p signal, but it has its faults: I've heard of problems losing sync when changing inputs (which I tend to do alot of). The deinterlacing circuitry is apparently not quite up to the standards of the DVDO chip.


I mostly use the deinterlacer for watching analog cable TV, live and from S-VHS recordings. This seems to be where the DVDO really shines, with the slightly noisy signals it does a great job of staying sharp and yet mostly artifact free. I am not so sure the Quadscan would deinterlace as well, but that might be made up for by the better scaling.


For DVDs I have always used a HTPC and will continue to do so with the D-ILA. I will probably also be getting a Satellite HDTV receiver soon, and over time that will might replace analog cable as my TV source (but not for a couple of years due to the poor DBS compression artifacts). I might also experiment with using dScaler on my HTPC to scale the analog CATV/VCR sources to the DILA resolution. They may have better algorithms than the Quadscan, and will probably have equivalent or better scaling.


Any advice?... does the Quadscan scaling make up for its poor video deinterlacing, or is the DVDO going to be the same. I know this comes down to a value judgement about whether you prefer scaling artifacts or deinterlace artifacts, but I am curious to hear especially from people who have used both Iscan and Quadscans with their D-ILAs.


-Tom
 

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Hi, how do you have your iscan set up for brightness/contrast/tint. This is just what I need. Thanks for your answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a box called the Sima ColorCorrector Pro-Series, model SCC. It cost a bit over $100, and is designed to defeat Macrovision (which is helpful since macrovision can mess with the DVDO), but it has the nice benefit of also having controls for Brightness, Contrast, Tint, Color, and Sharpness, as well as gain controls for red, blue, and green. Basically it comes before the DVDO in the chain, with the source going into it, and the DVDO coming after it. It can use either composite or S-Video (as long as you use the same on both ends). I use S-video.


I got it before the Iscan with those controls came out... today I probably wouldn't bother with the extra box, I would just get a newer DVDO.


Okay, back to the subject at hand: is the Quadscan better than DVDO for the DILA?


-Tom
 

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Tom,


Sorry, another question, not an answer. Actually, how about this: Keep the iscan, since you're only using it for relatively low res sources and use HTPC for DVD. In a few years when you get the sat, scalers will be better/cheaper.


My question: Why not just access the picture controls of your pj via remote instead of using the Sima? Does the Sima seem to lose any resolution or add noise to the picture?


Thanks
 

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Noah,


I have an SCC and I've found it adds a little noise to the image, but if you need to do colour processing then the improvement outweighs the cost. :)


- David Eddy
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did with/without tests on the SCC and found that the noise it added was unnoticeable to me, using a surprisingly good analog cable source, or laserdisc sources. I've never used it with DVD since I use the HTPC for that; I wouldn't be surprised if the noise were more noticeable against the higher quality DVD source.


Anyway, there are two reasons I use the SCC instead of the projector controls:


1. The projector doesn't have color or tint controls when using RGB input. This is pretty normal; adding those controls to a projector would require some fairly heavy duty processing that normally isn't necessary and would only degrade quality if it weren't used.


2. The projector's brightness and contrast operate after the line doubler not before. The specific problem I was having without the SCC was that the outputs from my VCRs were just a bit too high and they were blasting out (clipping) the whites in the DVDO itself. There is no way to fix that problem with the projector contrast control because the dynamic range has already been clipped on the signal going into the projector and it can't be restored. If I were also experiencing black "crush", where the shadow details were being lost due to a too-low signal entering the DVDO, then the SCC brightness control would have been useful for that as well. In a nutshell the issue is that any line doubler will clip at both ends (black and white) as it digitizes the signal, so it is necessary to use brightness/contrast controls to fit the signal into the proper range. All this stuff should be standardized and should just work, but sadly that's not reality.



Back to the scaling question... Last night I was at a kind of rave type dance party called the Health and Harmony festival in Sonoma. They had some fanciful, very colorful, dreamy NTSC images being shown over very high resolution digital projectors. Getting up close to the rear projection screen I saw what looked like DLP dot structure, and many pixels (at least 1280x1024, perhaps more).


The amazing thing about this for me was the smoothness of the images. They looked creamily filmlike, totally devoid of any scaling or line artifacts of any kind. In my DVDO setup, I tend not to notice the lines from the 480p now that I'm used to them, but it was just in a different league. In fact they were devoid of any NTSC noise as well; I suspect they must have used some heavy noise reduction filtering. It made the image soft but very lifelike and watchable, even though it was clearly NTSC source material. I'm not sure how watching a film would be on that system; the lack of sharpness might bother me, but it just looked natural. Anyway, I think this is the first time I was ever really impressed by upscaling, and it makes me think I don't want to compromise on upscaling. But then again there weren't any deinterlacing artifacts either; perhaps the projectors they were using had the new faroudja DCDi.


BTW, the other thing that really impressed me was the colors. The images were heavily processed on computers to add color effects so they were clearly using the full NTSC color gamut. There were colors that I had never seen on my Sony 1272, like a really saturated green.


I'm looking forward to the DILA with its xenon bulb which is supposed to have great color rendering!


-Tom
 
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