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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying out my new HLM-617W on some DVDs today. Everything looks great, but I can't figure this out:


Episode 2: wdiescreen, but with small bars top and bottome

Harry Potter 2: Menus full widescreen, but small bars top and bottom during movie

ShrecK: Full widescreen during the movie


What am I missing here? Are some movies not fully 16:9?


Alex
 

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Movies are not all done 16x9, but some variation close to that, and so on mnay of them you still get letterbox, but a very thin one compared to the old 4/3. I don't recall Episode 2 being one of them, but as long as one doesn't than it is just the movie most likely. My kid is watching Drumline right now on my 16x9 and there is boxing on it, but I thought that before the sets ever got prevalent that it would just go away except for those 2:35 mm one's, but it is such a small percent compared to the ole 4/3.


Enjoy your set.
 

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Its the different aspect ratios you're seeing....2.35 will give you small black bars top/bottom which I feel is most common....anything else (1.77,1.85 egs) will fill the screen completely. I kinda get excited when I see a DVD in DTS and 1.85 widescreen.:D
 

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Almost every DVD case lists the screen ratio on the back.
 

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Alex brings up a good point. I would bet that 99% of the Movie Going Public has NO IDEA that films are presented theatrically in two different aspect ratios. I watched movies for twenty years and didn't have a clue until I got a DVD player in 1998.


And really, what's the point if people who love films don't know/care? I've heard the typical film school justifications for scope, but I just don't think it's worth the trouble. It would be nice if everything was flat screen.
 

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Star Wars episode 2 is in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio and will give black bars at the top and bottom. Looked up Harry Potter too and it is also the same aspect ration which explains the bars as well. As mentioned above, any movie like Spider-man in the 1.85:1 aspect ration full screen on a 16:9 widescreen TV. Aspect ratios are noted on the back of the DVD case (as stated above).
 

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There should be bars on anything other than 1.77/1.78:1 ratio. Why aren't people getting black bars on 1.85:1 material. I don't like my pictures being cropped or stretched in the slightest way and would not get a 16:9 set if they are doing that with 1.85:1 content. What's the deal?
 

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Greetings


The black bars on 1.85:1 films takes up about 7% of the 16:9 real estate.


Overscan on most TV sets is 8 to 10% or more ...


When overscan > 7% ... then you see no bars.


Regards
 

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I'm unfamiliar with overscan. Is it just the vertical portion of the screen or are the sides getting "overscaned" also, cutting of some of the picture?
 

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Greetings


The sides are being chopped off too ...


If you reduce the overscan on the TV to 2% on the top and bottom, you will see the 1.85:1 black bars.


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Where can I learn a little bit more about exactly what overscan is and what it's for. I am obsessed with OAR and undistorted pics, I'm even considering a 4:3 set because there is not distorting of the picture, just bigger black bars. Do all TV's have overscan and is it always adjustable, or can it be eliminated all together?
 

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Quote:
Where can I learn a little bit more about exactly what overscan is and what it's for. I am obsessed with OAR and undistorted pics, I'm even considering a 4:3 set because there is not distorting of the picture, just bigger black bars. Do all TV's have overscan and is it always adjustable, or can it be eliminated all together?
Yeah, a 4:3 TV will completely solve any overscan problem and you can watch widescreen content as it was meant to be, right? Hardly. Don't be obsessed if you have 5% overscan on DVDs. This is how most calibrations are done in order to allow for expected overscan.


Perhaps I'm just not getting the meaning of your post. Movies in the theater have an aspect ratio of 1.78, 1.85, 2.35 or 2.40 (for the most part). A 4:3 television will still chop off the right and the left of the picture due to overscan. TV's are not made to show "the edge of the picture", unless it's an HD broadcast. At that point you can eliminate overscan, unless the TV limits that option. Most TV's will have some sort of distortion at the edge of the picture on any type of input.
 

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what TV's sets have the least amount of overscan. The sets I'm mostly considering are DLP's.
 

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Quote:
what TV's sets have the least amount of overscan. The sets I'm mostly considering are DLP's.
Not sure. I have a GWII and have adjusted the overscan to about 2% all the way around for HD and 3% for DVD.


An experienced ISF guy should know.
 

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any tv can have 0 or even negative overscan-it is then called underscan and you can see parts of the picture you were not meant to see,like the edge of the picture or the bottom of it which is where the data stream is broadcast if I am not mistaken


Jordan
 

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I'm using a HTPC as my DVD player, with a GWII as the display. The GWII is set to exactly fill the screen when a PC signal is fed to it, ie. 0% overscan. Using ZoomPlayer to play DVDs I can zoom in/out and choose how much over/underscan I want to see. These days I usually just zoom in such that the DVD image fills the entire screen regardless of aspect ratio.


-Rob-
 
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