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I noticed that some flat-panel sets have an DVI, while other sets have an HDMI. It is quite noticeable that DVI is often found in cheaper sets, while HDMI is often found in more expensive sets. Is it expensive for manufacturers to install an HDMI input than a DVI input on a TV?
 

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I think that it has more to do with when the panel was introduced. The newer panels will mostly have HDMI, while the older ones will have DVI.


Dan
 

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HDMI is newer and only modestly different in cost since the details are handled by chips. It is basically focused on the home theater market. DVI was originally designed as a connection between computers and their displays and was then moved into the home theater world.


HDMI carries digital audio as well as digital video. Many people ignore the audio carried on the HDMI cable and make alternate audio connections. HDMI comes in versions where the newer versions are authorized to carry higher bit-rate audio from specialty audio devices such as DVD-Audio players. Most current HDMI devices are only using the original version which limits digital audio to standard CD style (and DVD-Video's digital audio stream of course).


HDMI is backwards compatible with DVI. Barring engineering goofs that a few devices have, you can connect an HDMI source to a DVI display or a DVI source to an HDMI display using a simple adapter cable or plug which switches the video wires around to the right pins for the different style connector. When the devices establish a connection, a handshake is automatically performed and both devices lock into the DVI standard. The HDMI connector is smaller but only provides a non-locking, friction fit. The DVI connector is larger and can be locked in place with screws.


HDMI offers 480i, 480p, 720p and 1080i resolutions (with additional bandwidth available for the future). DVI supports all of those EXCEPT 480i. Not all HDMI devices enable 480i apparently because they were concerned about problems if the user attached them to a DVI device.


HDMI offers some alternate transmission standards which provide for higher bit depth (particularly as regards colors) when both ends are HDMI. Current source and display devices do not take advantage of this -- i.e., they use DVI style video bandwidth even though both ends are HDMI. So this is only a potential advantage for future devices.


HDMI provides additional equalization in the transmitter and receiver electronics which means you can use longer cable runs than DVI without signal problems that might require you to add a repeater.


HDMI always incorporates the "HDCP" copy protection standard. DVI devices may or may not incorporate that. If an HDCP enabled source device (be it HDMI or DVI) finds it is connected to a display or intervening device which is not HDCP enabled it will refuse to make the connection.


Over time, you can expect that fewer and fewer devices will have DVI connections and more and more will have HDMI.

--Bob
 

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Bob, that is a terrific write-up on HDMI!


I have the Pioneer 4340 and I originally used the HDMI input exclusively but have found it annoying. The "handshake" between my Toshiba DST-3100 and the media receiver takes a couple of seconds everytime I change inputs or turn on the devices. This results in the display blinking a static pattern. On two occasions, the connection somehow failed and I lost video while I was watching a program. For some reason, everything goes back to normal if I turn off the plasma and satellite box for a while.


I have basically given up and I use the Component connection instead with no noticeable loss of image quality. I suppose I will use the HDMI connection again when the future dictates this necessity through the activation of the HDCP function.
 

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A handshake related delay of a couple seconds is pretty normal for HDMI or DVI. Of course it would be nicer if the display blanked out while it was going on. Most people don't switch source devices that often so this is not really an issue for them.


Presuming the loss of signal you experienced was not user error (accidentally hit the remote and changed sources), the other likely cause would be a cable problem. Cable length is what most people think of here, but the more common problem for intermittent connections with HDMI is that the plug at one end or the other has worked loose due to the weight of the cable and the fact that the plug is only a friction fit. This is particular true for people who have put an HDMI to DVI adapter plug at the HDMI end since the weight of the adapter puts a lever-arm sort of strain on the HDMI plug and jack. It helps to put a support under such an adapter plug (folded paper towel for example).


--------------------------------------------------------------


It occurs to me that I should give the executive summary for my original post: With current source and display devices HDMI video is essentially identical to DVI video in all significant aspects. It is best to think of HDMI as just, and only, DVI video plus the addition of digital audio, and using a different plug.

--Bob
 

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Originally quoted by Bob Pariseau



"HDMI always incorporates the "HDCP" copy protection standard. DVI devices may or may not incorporate that. If an HDCP enabled source device (be it HDMI or DVI) finds it is connected to a display or intervening device which is not HDCP enabled it will refuse to make the connection"


This is what a lot of people overlook.
 

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I see HDMI as the connection of the future. For TVs that currently use DVI, their next generation version will likely include HDMI. HDMI on a TV is a requirement for my plasma purchase. My cable co provides an HD DVR with HDMI. DVD players are available with HDMI. The next step is audio receivers with HDMI switching - hopefully 2005 models.



JCPZero
 

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I have an HDMI DVD player and HDMI plasma panel (both Pioneer). There is a couple of second hand-shake delay when the equipment is first powered on, but the panel is blacked out during this delay. There is no delay when switching between input modes once the equipment is turned on.


If DVD-A is important to you, make sure you get a second generation HDMI. I have first generation, which does not support DVD-A. In order for a DVD-A to play in my Pioneer 59Avi player at 96 kHz, I have to disable the HDMI output. This is not a problem for compressed DVD-A (i.e., DTS, DD) or SACD in any mode. Note that I don't use HDMI for audio -- I use iLink for that. It doesn't matter, however. Player simply won't fire up 96 kHz DVD-A if HDMI is active.


Ross
 

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Im looking into buying a new lcd tv particularly the Sony 55" HDTV (KDF-55WF655). Is it wise though to look into tvs that don't have both the dvi and hdmi input connections? I ask because of the delay with hdmi and that dvi is still being used for the present time. I know hdmi works with dvi and vice versa but will it make any difference if i have a seperate input for both of them?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by rkunces
Im looking into buying a new lcd tv particularly the Sony 55" HDTV (KDF-55WF655). Is it wise though to look into tvs that don't have both the dvi and hdmi input connections? I ask because of the delay with hdmi and that dvi is still being used for the present time. I know hdmi works with dvi and vice versa but will it make any difference if i have a seperate input for both of them?
It would be preferable to have the two inputs in case you have two things to connect. If not you can always use a DVI or HDMI switch. To me it wouldn't be a dealbreaker but another feature difference to factor in to the choice.
 

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Are there any displays / TV's that have both DVI and HDMI? In the case of the Pioneer plasmas, it's HDMI only. Unless there is a significant price difference, I would lean towards the HDMI because it has more expansion capability in the forseeable future (note that I avoided the dreaded phrase, "future ready"). In other words, the HDMI format is far from being "maxed out" by current HD and DVD media. Having said that, a discussion of the relative merit of 12 bit colour over 8 bit is the topic of another thread!
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Ross in Toronto
Are there any displays / TV's that have both DVI and HDMI?
Sharp LCD G series have both HDMI and DVI inputs, unsure about the GD models. Apparently, DVI is there to better support connecting a PC since the audio input for that connection is a stereo mini plug rather than RCA jacks


HDMI will future-proof you to the extent that future devices are more likely to have HDMI, any new formats new equipment may support is irrelevant WRT connecting it to a panel you may buy now.
 

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I am currently using a Fujitsu 63" feeding it DVI from an HD source. Does anyone have an experience with this setup and are there Aspect Ratio Selections (unlike Componen HD feed where there is no Aspect ratio selection)

Thanx
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by adb
Originally quoted by Bob Pariseau



"HDMI always incorporates the "HDCP" copy protection standard. DVI devices may or may not incorporate that. If an HDCP enabled source device (be it HDMI or DVI) finds it is connected to a display or intervening device which is not HDCP enabled it will refuse to make the connection"


This is what a lot of people overlook.
And the immediate outcome of the above is that you can NOT use traditional LCD monitors with digital cable boxes. I have recently discovered that my 20" LCD monitor with DVI connector would not work with the latest and greatest Motorola 6200 cable box. It will show the picture for 1 second and then the screen will go black. The signal is present but the picture is not being displayed. I've figured it is due to the content protection and the fact that the monitor does not have a "chip" or whatever the means of ensuring compliance. Do people see the same thing outhere? Is there a special cable/device, maybe, which will answer the request of the cable box and make the connection?
 

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Quote:
... you can connect an HDMI source to a DVI display or a DVI source to an HDMI display using a simple adapter cable or plug which switches the video wires around to the right pins...
Is there an adapter which will take a DVI source (with RCA jack audio outputs) and feed it into an HDMI input to provide video+audio? I'd like to feed the DVI output from my dish networks HD receiver into the HDMI input of my Sharp LC-45GX6U LCD TV. I can do that with an adapator I found at BestBuy, but I get picture but (of course) no audio.


Also related - When I take DVI output from a PC and through that same adaptor feed it into the Sharp HDMI, it selects 720x480 60Hz resolution. Is this a limitation of HDMI? Should PC video be able to drive 1920x1080 devices through HDMI? Strangely the Plug&Play flat panel info shown by the video driver shows 1920x540x60Hz as the max capability. But if I force it into this resolution mode, I get a black screen. Any thoughts on what's limiting things to 720x480? (PC or HDMI or Sharp TV?). I can go to 1280x1024 on the DVI input of the Sharp, so I'd think it would let me get at least that high through HDMI.


Thanks,
 

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I think you're out-of-luck with the DVI + RCA --> HDMI adapter since the RCA audio format is analog and the HDMI audio is digital...


As for the format issue, I'm fairly certain the HDMI format will go 1920 x 540 x 60Hz and even higher. According to www.hdmi.org, the HDMI format will go as high as 1080p (yes p!). That's a lot of bandwidth (HDMI has a 5 gigabit bandwidth). I suspect the problems you are experienceing aren't due to limitations in the HDMI spec but rather problems in protocol.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by yfisher
And the immediate outcome of the above is that you can NOT use traditional LCD monitors with digital cable boxes. I have recently discovered that my 20" LCD monitor with DVI connector would not work with the latest and greatest Motorola 6200 cable box. It will show the picture for 1 second and then the screen will go black.
Are you sure that's not because your LCD monitor is unable to sync

480i or 1080i?


I've connected my Motorola DCT-5100 to a Dell 2000FP using DVI and

it was able to display when I configured the Motorola to spit out 480p.
 
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