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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings I have a question that I felt would be best asked here…


I have main workstation with a Gf4 4600 graphics card (one DVI and one VGA output). It is located approxamently 20’ away from my 42†Sony Wega XBR HDTV. This means I can not use a standard DVI cable because of the distance. So as far as I can tell here are my options


1. Buy a overprice super-quality DVI cable (way to much $... upwards of $400)

2. buy this lame DVI extender device (Too much again…$400) http://store.kayye.com/kayye/dvirepeater.html

3. convert DVI to VGA and try to use this silly, cheap looking device… http://www.hallresearch.com/brochure...5_splitter.htm ( $250...Hey you get a cap with it LOL) It looks like it cost $20 to make so ill stear clear of that one.


Witch lead me to my dream solution… Im sure there must be a way to convert the video output of the main PC using software or a hardware converter, to be sent over CAT5 to a remote HTPC (I have many) (right next to the HDTV) then have it output there via a el-cheapo ATI all in wonder pro. What do you think?
 

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No, there is no way to "convert" video output and send it to another PC to be output from an inferior video card. The amount of pixel data a video card outputs is far beyond the bandwidth of any LAN device I am aware of, and video cards are only intended to output to a display device - they don't render a screen and then input the data back into the computer for any other purpose.


However, there is no reason in my mind that you couldn't buy two DVI cable ends and connect them by a 20' length of shielded Cat5 cable from the PC to your TV. Shielded cat5 is excellent for general noise rejection and long cable runs, so it would be a pretty good solution, as long as you can handle the task of connecting the cable ends to the cat5. You could even cut out the "middle" of your existing DVI cable and solder the loose ends to the Cat5 individual conductors (this is what I would personally do if I really needed to get the job done).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by 0db


However, there is no reason in my mind that you couldn't buy two DVI cable ends and connect them by a 20' length of shielded Cat5 cable from the PC to your TV. Shielded cat5 is excellent for general noise rejection and long cable runs, so it would be a pretty good solution, as long as you can handle the task of connecting the cable ends to the cat5. You could even cut out the "middle" of your existing DVI cable and solder the loose ends to the Cat5 individual conductors (this is what I would personally do if I really needed to get the job done).
Thanks for the interesting idea friend...


I am a master solderer (I have surface soldered SDRAM to a motherboard before) And would have no problem trying this cheap and easy solution if I could if I could get a few other opinions on shielded cat5's ability to carry DVI video 20' (sounds a a little suspect to me)... I wonder how many pins DVI uses (as I am sure you know CAT5 only has 8 wires)
 

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Depends if it's a single or Dual-Link. Dual-Link is a 24pin connector so you would need 3 cables. Suggest you use CAT5e since DVI is kinda high bandwidth (CAT5e isn't expensive anyway). Check for CAT6 if you can find some.


Those cables can carry between 1-10Gbps over 100ft so DVI should be possible. Worst case it doesn't work and you end up with 3 good inexpensive 20ft cables for your LAN.
 

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I'm not understanding what you are trying to do here...


You want to output the video from your main rig and send it to cheaper card for output to the display?


If there was a way to get the video output 20' to your HTPC, you would still only get the quality of the cheaper video card. (Weakest link in the chain...)


So, why not just send the file across the network and let the HTPC render it?


Why is it important that the main rig render it in the first place?
 

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Would it not be possible to just set your DVD ROM to "shared" and then access it through the network?
 

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CAT5e is 100 MHz rated (tested up to 350 Mhz) and CAT6 is 200 MHz rated (tested up to 550 Mhz).


DVI needs between 25 to 165MHz depending on resolution. So you'll be fine for 20ft.
 

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I now have a surplus PC with an old ATI AIW that I was going to connect to my HT. My new PC is in the den about 30' away and that will have the suped up components, and I am going to network the two PCs. I see that Showshifter supports networking, but have been unable to get an answer from the folks at their BB. Has anyone here used Showshifter's network functions, or can anyone recommend another program that centralizes HTPC controls over a network?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by The Machine
Would it not be possible to just set your DVD ROM to "shared" and then access it through the network?
currently I stream all media such as divx, Mp3, DVD off the shared RIG, and ripped .vob files over the LAN to a remote PC (Actually its is a chipped xbox acting as a streaming media center (as well as for console gaming of course :p) My main reason for doing this would be to get PC games to show up on my HDTV in high res, as well as possibly using the HDTV for internet (i have a nice wireless Keyboard mouse combo) I was also considering looking into HDTV PCI recover PCI car (if such a beast exists)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Gozer
CAT5e is 100 MHz rated (tested up to 350 Mhz) and CAT6 is 200 MHz rated (tested up to 550 Mhz).


DVI needs between 25 to 165MHz depending on resolution. So you'll be fine for 20ft.
Alright then!


I am going to try this!
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by GoFastMan
Alright then!


I am going to try this!
You try that. I'm trying multipair AES cables myself. each pair is low cap with it's own shield. I also condsidered CAT6 cable but was a bit concerened about the lack of shielding between pairs. The DVI spec specifies each pair to be individually shielded. Now that may be due to EMI/RFI/FCC issues but I also think that voltage levels are low 1.6v? to where interpair crosstalk could be an issue.


I do know CAT5E or 6 cable can nicely fint into a DVI connector. The fat AES cable is going to be a kludgy solution at best. But thinner cables don't have the low capacitance performance needed for longer legnths.


And don't forget those DDC lines if you expect HDCP to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Glimmie
You try that. I'm trying multipair AES cables myself. each pair is low cap with it's own shield. I also condsidered CAT6 cable but was a bit concerened about the lack of shielding between pairs. The DVI spec specifies each pair to be individually shielded. Now that may be due to EMI/RFI/FCC issues but I also think that voltage levels are low 1.6v? to where interpair crosstalk could be an issue.


I do know CAT5E or 6 cable can nicely fint into a DVI connector. The fat AES cable is going to be a kludgy solution at best. But thinner cables don't have the low capacitance performance needed for longer legnths.


And don't forget those DDC lines if you expect HDCP to work.
I have decided to back off the CAt5e/cat6 idea because according to this thread http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/show...ight=rgbhv+cat5 it does not seem possible. However i am still very interested in the outcome of your shielded multipair AES cables. Please keep us updated with you progress! If this works i will grab soem from http://www.sommercable.com/3__produk...0_0356_10.html :)
 
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