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Bear with me for a moment: We watched one of my favorite films again last night, Blade Runner, and everytime I see it, I'm reminded of why I love it so much. I could make this a very long, descriptive post about the beauty of the film, but I'll get to my point: More than any battlefield/war scene, deathbed scene, etc.. I feel the dying words of Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) at the end are one of the most moving (to me) in any film. I'm not really sure why I feel this way, but I think it's more the context of his character that does it; the delivery of the lines and the lines themselves in the context of everything the film is about, to me, best convey the finality of death and what it means to the person dying. Their memories, experiences, no matter how great or unique they are, are about to be lost forever (like tears in rain). Roy's words to Dekard, whose live he's just saved, make me think about mortality more than I probably should..


This may be a downer post, but it's early and I haven't had my coffee yet; so my question is: what are your favorite, most 'moving' dying words that make you think about what death means, either to the character or to yourself? It could broadly be asked: what's your favorite death scene? I'm either looking for more discussion of this Blade Runner film or others I may have forgotten or missed.

cheers ;o)


-sc
 

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Well, I am always moved by Spock's death scene, and Kirk's eulogy for him, in Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan.


"We are gathered here today to pay final respects to our honored dead. But it should be noted that this death takes place in the shadow of new life, the sunrise of a new world; a world that our beloved comrade gave his life to protect and nourish. He did not feel this sacrifice a vain or empty one, and we will not debate his profound wisdom at these proceedings. Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most...human."


Knowledge of one's mortality is the curse, and the gift, of humankind. If you are afraid of death, it can be a constant haunting fear. But eternal life could mean eventual eternal boredom; it is when you truly realize the candle is burning down irrevocably that you learn to treasure each moment and seize the day. Alas for most of us, such realizations come rarely until it is too late.
 

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Absolute best last words (non movie) as engraved on a tombstone...


I told you I was ill !!!


Goinging out on a laugh...


Was it not Quentin Crisp whose last words were "My God, look at that walpaper... One of us has to go" !!


As for mortality and life after death I am currently struggling with "The physics of immortality" interesting readin if debateable theory.
 

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For a truly uplifting movie about the subject, I watched the recently released Kurosawa movie, Ikiru. Truly wonderful movie. So glad that Criterion restored it. The consideration of our demise and what we do with our lives is not morbid. It's a healthy philosophical question.
 

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I've always been a sucker for A Tale of Two Cities. Let's take the 1935 version with Ronald Colman as the definitive version (alas, not yet out on DVD. There is much work to be done bringing out the old classics).

It's a far, far better thing that I do than I have ever done. It's a far, far better rest I go to than I have ever known.


If I can cheat a bit and go past dying words and on to funerals, I'll take the Auden poem read in Four Weddings and a Funeral

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,

Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,

Silence the piano and with muffled drum

Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.


Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead

Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,

Put crepe bows round the necks of the public doves,

Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.


He was my North, my South, my East and West,

My working week and my Sunday rest,

My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;

I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.


The stars are not wanted now; put out every one;

Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;

Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood;

For nothing now can ever come to any good.


W H Auden April 1936
 

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David Bowman last exit of the Discovery Rocket to explore the monlith since the crew of the discovery had all been killed by the now paranoid HAL9000 who was programmed to keep secret information it was built to disclose, he became paranoid and wasn't able to function. David Bowman when on a recon mission to the monolith he exclaimed his last words and died. 2010 the sequel has a russian taking a pod over the monolith and when what looked like stars coming together the monolith blew his craft to non recoverable orbit to his death also, but David Bowman was the one of the two to speak their last message before they died 9 years apart. Heywood Flloyd played this message over and over trying to decipher the dying mans message seen in the russion rocket monitor of the "Leonov". Dave Bowman knowing he couldn't return to the Discovery rocket left his last message to be recorded and sent back to earth message was "MY GOD, It's Full of Stars".
 

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The dying scene in Life of Brian...truely excellent.

'ARRRGGGHH' nearly every action/drama movie when villian buys it.


Chris.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Sutter Cane
Bear with me for a moment: We watched one of my favorite films again last night, Blade Runner, and everytime I see it, I'm reminded of why I love it so much. I could make this a very long, descriptive post about the beauty of the film, but I'll get to my point: More than any battlefield/war scene, deathbed scene, etc.. I feel the dying words of Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) at the end are one of the most moving (to me) in any film. I'm not really sure why I feel this way, but I think it's more the context of his character that does it; the delivery of the lines and the lines themselves in the context of everything the film is about, to me, best convey the finality of death and what it means to the person dying. Their memories, experiences, no matter how great or unique they are, are about to be lost forever (like tears in rain). Roy's words to Dekard, whose live he's just saved, make me think about mortality more than I probably should..


This may be a downer post, but it's early and I haven't had my coffee yet; so my question is: what are your favorite, most 'moving' dying words that make you think about what death means, either to the character or to yourself? It could broadly be asked: what's your favorite death scene? I'm either looking for more discussion of this Blade Runner film or others I may have forgotten or missed.

cheers ;o)


-sc
Couldn't agree more...see my sig ;)


Not exactly dying words, but the son's last words to his dying dad in "Big Fish" I thought were quite moving.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Sutter Cane

Bear with me for a moment: We watched one of my favorite films again last night, Blade Runner, and everytime I see it, I'm reminded of why I love it so much. I could make this a very long, descriptive post about the beauty of the film, but I'll get to my point: More than any battlefield/war scene, deathbed scene, etc.. I feel the dying words of Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) at the end are one of the most moving (to me) in any film. I'm not really sure why I feel this way, but I think it's more the context of his character that does it; the delivery of the lines and the lines themselves in the context of everything the film is about, to me, best convey the finality of death and what it means to the person dying. Their memories, experiences, no matter how great or unique they are, are about to be lost forever (like tears in rain). Roy's words to Dekard, whose live he's just saved, make me think about mortality more than I probably should../B]

On a side note, this "dying words" scene inspired Joe Satriani to write the song "Tears in the Rain" on his Extremist album. It's short and simple, but you should check it out if you haven't heard it. :)


-mm


p.s. great topic!
 

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Can we have a moment for worst dying words?? How about James Tiberius Kirk: "Oh, my!!"
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by chuft
Well, I am always moved by Spock's death scene, and Kirk's eulogy for him, in Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan.


"We are gathered here today to pay final respects to our honored dead. But it should be noted that this death takes place in the shadow of new life, the sunrise of a new world; a world that our beloved comrade gave his life to protect and nourish. He did not feel this sacrifice a vain or empty one, and we will not debate his profound wisdom at these proceedings. Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most...human."


This is the scene that came to mind for me as well. And shortly after the eulogy, Spock's casket slides into space and then down toward the planet to the sweet strains of "Amazing Grace". Very moving.


Also, just prior to the burial scene, the final words between Spock and Kirk, when it becomes clear that Spock is sacrificing his life to save the lives of the rest of the crew: "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few...or the one."
 

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I thought the ending of Deep Impact was very good. When the astronauts were heading for the larger commet to blow it up and themselves. The guy that lost his sight was talking to his wife and son he had never seen. He was reaching out towards the monitor and was saying "be good" to his son over and over till they reached the commet.
 

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The death of the emperor in Gladiator



MARCUS: Commodus, your faults as a son, is my failure as a father.

COMMODUS: Father, I would butcher the whole world if you would only love me!!!



That does it for me.
 
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