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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the summer i purchased this player from ebay. I sold off my CLD-99 and wanted something different. I originally was trying to get a LD-S9 but it was out of my price range and i saw this EAD player. I heard good things about the player but there wasn't much information available. I checked laserdiscarchive.co.uk but they only have the 7000 model listed with little information.


The chap who sold it too me said it was released in 1998 but looking back through my old widescreen review magazines i noticed it was listed in there viewing room printed in 1995. The player for a start looks great and has the usually features auto turn, AC3, pause CLV and a few extra audio inputs. I've checked the quality of the video outputs. The composite was a lot better than the s-video. Which was a u-turn for me when i was using CLD-99 where the s-video gave great results thanks to its comb filter. I don't think the EAD player has any built in noise reduction. There is nothing adjustable on the player or remote.


One odd thing is that if you pause the film on the remote the picture goes black on CLV and CAV, i thought that was a bit weird that i couldn't even pause CAV then i realised if you pause the film on the player itself it allows for freeze frame on both formats.


Ive read that the player is built off a CLD-704, i noticed inside it has a similar spindle to the 99 which was the basic guts of a 704. The clamp is huge and completely different to the other players i've opened up.


As anyone owned one of these before?.i would like to know more about this player and peoples experiences with it.
 

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I have not worked on the EAD T-8000 but I had also heard it was a 704 that was modified for an audiophile digital output. A lot of high end audio companies took the 704, 99 or Panasonic LX-900U and did this, no Video improvements in these players, it was all for Audio digital output.


BTW it could be a 1998 release from EAD. McIntosh sold the MLD-7020 which is a CLD-97 years after Pioneer quit selling it. Pioneer either kept making these for others or they stocked them up.


Kurtis
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cheers for the feedback Kurtis.


I presume if its the guts of the 704 then i imagine the picture is identical. Im running it through a Mitsubishi HC1100 projector not sure what type of comb filter that uses but the picture is very nice.


On the audio side i found the optical output to give a better signal than the co-axial. It sounded fuller. Which is strange because the 99 had better audio from its co-axial.
 

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Remember the difference with the EAD unit is the digital outputs have been upgraded for better clocking and stability. I still thought the coax would be better but all of these should be beter than the 99.
 

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I don't understand the infatuation with the optical digital output when the physical stature of the coaxial would favor a stronger and a more solid connection than the no so stable optical.

I question the fuller advantage of the optical...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenyatto
I don't understand the infatuation with the optical digital output when the physical stature of the coaxial would favor a stronger and a more solid connection than the no so stable optical.

I question the fuller advantage of the optical...
It depends upon the design and execution of both the transmitter and receiver. The results are based almost entirely upon the amount of jitter involved in the signal and its communication.


It is just as possible for a coaxial line to transmit and/or add to jitter levels as it is with a optical/TOSLINK line. Both are dependent upon the same steps - the data+jitter pulled from the source (CD, DVD, card, HD, etc.), the interface/transmitter at the coaxial RCA/BNC or optical/LED output, the design, integrity and quality of the cable (shielding & impedance w/coaxial, single vs. multistrand w/optical), and the interface/receiver at the input.


Overall, the coaxial cable is more physically secure, yes, but assuming a good and undisturbed optical connection, the security is not determinant of quality. And there are at least two optical fiber cables that provide a locking feature and/or other ability to ensure a proper connection.


Best choice, ultimately - the one that sounds better.
 
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