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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a novice and will stay that way. I'm reeling after spending an unGodly amount of time trying to figure out how to make DVDs from my Canon HF200. It's not happen'in and the camcorder is now on ebay.

What's a really easy camcorder and separate DVD burner that'll bypass my computer completely? Canon customer service went over everything with me and was very nice, but something's wrong. The shop owner even came over and couldn't make it happen so I'm prolly just done with Canon - nothing personal.

After loads of research the Panasonic HDC-SD60 and VW-BN2 jump out (along with a latest version blue-ray player).

Thanks and any last minute suggestions would be very welcome before I go the above route. I'm partial to no internal memory of any type just to keep it all as simple as possible.
 

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You could always use a DVR or VHS to DVD machine. Not the best of quality, but most camcorders come with some sort of composite SD output. Or component or coax.


I use ffmpeg and mpeg2enc to make my dvds. But not for the meek. Semi-worth it to me since I want pro-ish results on an amateur budget. If only to explain to myself why so called pro outfits can't deliver on their budgets.
 

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I went through the same learning curve.


Tried using 4 separate programs to go from camera to DVD (standard definition).


Seeking the best also made me crazy.


Finally settled on using Edius Neo Booster to go from file to DVD in one step.


The results are totally acceptable.


Edius is also a great editor, which is what I bought it for.


I have a Panasonic TM700 camcorder and shoot in 60p.


Alan
 

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If you are using Windows 7, the absolute easiest way (with OK image quality) is to use Windows Live Move Maker that will import the MTS files created from the camera, you can add effects if you want, and then will save it as a WMV file. Then use Windows DVD Maker to take the WMV file and burn to DVD. Even though two programs are involved, it is pretty easy.


But like I said, the image quality is OK.

I've been trying the Canon Image Maker program that came with my Canon HFM300 and found it to produce better looking DVD video, but the program isn't the easiest to use.


There's also Sony DVD Architect Studio (that is simple) and Sony Vegas (advanced). Another is Corel VideoStudio Pro X3. I've used these as well and liked the Sony Architect Studio and Corel VideoStudio.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would the Sony HDR-CX300 and Sony DVDirect MC6 be a GREAT way to go? And then a Panasonic DMP-BD65K Blue-Ray Player to view the DVD's that I'd be making from the DVDirect MC6.
 

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there is much confusion in this thread.


The OP wants to make "DVD's". usually that means SD, and would require conversion if the camera is taking HD. You lose resolution and quality.


Now, a bluray player is mentioned, so it seems that what is wanted is: an AVCHD DVD that will play in a bluray plyer (presumably hooked up to an HDTV). So, you want to view HD video using DVD platters (not DVD resolution).


Ok, yes. The simplest method for making an AVCHD DVD is the hardware method: One example: take a new Sony HD camcorder, shoot at 17Mbps, and you can directly burn an AVCHD DVD with your HD files at highest resolution using DVD DiRECT that will play in any new bluray player of any brand. You can either hook up the camcorder to the burner using usb or take out the sd card and insert in into the burner.


So,

the Sony HDR-CX300 and Sony DVDirect MC6 would be a GREAT way to go.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by markr041 /forum/post/19508161


there is much confusion in this thread.


The OP wants to make "DVD's". usually that means SD, and would require conversion if the camera is taking HD. You lose resolution and quality.


Now, a bluray player is mentioned, so it seems that what is wanted is: an AVCHD DVD that will play in a bluray plyer (presumably hooked up to an HDTV). So, you want to view HD video using DVD platters (not DVD resolution).


Ok, yes. The simplest method for making an AVCHD DVD is the hardware method: One example: take a new Sony HD camcorder, shoot at 17Mbps, and you can directly burn an AVCHD DVD with your HD files at highest resolution using DVD DiRECT that will play in any new bluray player of any brand. You can either hook up the camcorder to the burner using usb or take out the sd card and insert in into the burner.


So,

the Sony HDR-CX300 and Sony DVDirect MC6 would be a GREAT way to go.

Just remember that if you go this route and make a AVCHD DVD, that it will only play in a Blu-Ray player that supports AVCHD. You can't take that AVCHD DVD and have it work in a standard DVD player.
 

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1.What would be the easiest way to make AVCHD DVD from TM700?

2. What is the best (and easiest) way to watch HD video from TM700 on Media Player - something like WD HD Live?


Would HD Writer 2.0 which comes with the cam sufficient?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkhw77 /forum/post/19509127


1.What would be the easiest way to make AVCHD DVD from TM700?

2. What is the best (and easiest) way to watch HD video from TM700 on Media Player - something like WD HD Live?


Would HD Writer 2.0 which comes with the cam sufficient?

1) The easiest way would be to copy your 1920a (or whatever resolution) video clips from your TM700 camcorder to your computer or external hard drive. You can then use HD writer to copy/burn those files from your hard drive either to a SDHC card (Your Bluray player would have to be AVCHD compliant) or a DVD-R using a standard DVD-R burner. The thing people get confused about is the fact your DVD-R burner does NOT have to be AVCHD or BluRay enabled in order to burn a AVCHD DVD disc. (You can burn your AVCHD file to a BD-R Bluray disc using a Bluray burner if you have the equipment). The standard DVD-R AVCHD burned disc will NOT play back in a standard DVD burner or player and must be played in a Bluray/AVCHD enabled player. I have a Panasonic HD Camcorder and a BD-65 Bluray player. I seamlessly play the AVCHD DVD-R discs as well as the reuseable SDHC cards. The downside is that at 1920A resolution a AVCHD DVD-R only holds about one half hour of video. (figure about 8gb/hr useage) A dual layer disc increases the time to about 55 minutes. You need a large hard drive but that holds true for any format HD video.


You would have to get another opinion about using Media Player. It's easy and seamless to play the video with an excellent picture on a HD flat screen TV so I never bothered to try anything else. I didn't think Media Player would produce a quality 1920-1080 HiDef video.


The only thing lacking in the HD Writer application is the rather basic editing features but it sounds like you are kind of a novice (no offense) so you can learn without buying the wrong program. Enjoy...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by FAUguy /forum/post/19508299


Just remember that if you go this route and make a AVCHD DVD, that it will only play in a Blu-Ray player that supports AVCHD. You can't take that AVCHD DVD and have it work in a standard DVD player.

I figured that the world is becoming HD and that most new players will play AVCHD. Is that probably safe to say?

Thanks.
 

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I have the WDTV Live. It plays files from my AVCHD camcorder in their native format beautifully on my HDTV. But it is not compatible with AVCHD!


So, what is going on? AVCHD is more than a codec and wrapper and set of bit- and frame-rates; it is also a particular folder structure. The WDTV Live has no problem with the video clips; it just has not a clue about the folder structure. So, if you take an sd card from the camcorder and put in in (with a usb adapter) to the WDTV Live, it will not just play your clips seamlessly in sequence, like a, say, Panasonic blu-ray player would (which has an sd slot).


Here are the specs of an AVCHD-compliant video clip:


Format : AVC

Format/Info : Advanced Video Codec

Format profile : [email protected]

Format settings, CABAC : Yes

Format settings, ReFrames : 2 frames

Format settings, GOP : M=1, N=30

Codec ID : 27

Duration : 12s 445ms

Bit rate mode : Variable

Bit rate : 15.7 Mbps

Maximum bit rate : 16.0 Mbps

Width : 1 920 pixels

Height : 1 080 pixels

Display aspect ratio : 16:9

Frame rate : 29.970 fps

Color space : YUV

Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0

Bit depth : 8 bits

Scan type : Interlaced

Scan order : Top Field First

Bits/(Pixel*Frame) : 0.253

Stream size : 23.3 MiB (94%)


Audio

ID : 4352 (0x1100)

Menu ID : 1 (0x1)

Format : AC-3

Format/Info : Audio Coding 3

Mode extension : CM (complete main)

Codec ID : 129

Duration : 12s 544ms

Bit rate mode : Constant

Bit rate : 256 Kbps

Channel(s) : 2 channels

Channel positions : Front: L R

Sampling rate : 48.0 KHz

Bit depth : 16 bits


Works on the WDTV Live.


So for the WDTV Live to play your *movies* you have to string together the clips into one movie (video), using an editor. You want an editor that does not ruin the quality (smart-rendering). The WDTV Live will play your raw video clips in sequence (if you tell it where they are located), but with pauses in-between (it is not AVCHD-aware). That is why you need to assemble them yourself to make one video.
 
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