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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm single drywalling on clips/hat-channel for my ceiling and foundation walls. For the interior walls, I'm clips/hat-channel, double dry wall and green glue.

I am going to get the whole room as best I can BUT if some areas are weaker than others does it defeat the purpose entirely or will it (for the most part help).

I'm concerned about some spots (doors, electrical boxes, can lights).

Will my efforts mitigate the sound reduction or will these open spots render the whole thing in vain.

Thanks
Joe
 

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Your overall plan, going cheap on some walls and ceiling and not addressing your wall penetrations makes me concerned that you will be disappointed. You can only use the old saying, better than nothing, Hard to tell now much better. If it addresses 20% of the issue would you think it a fair return on your investment?
 

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So I'm single drywalling on clips/hat-channel for my ceiling and foundation walls. For the interior walls, I'm clips/hat-channel, double dry wall and green glue.

I am going to get the whole room as best I can BUT if some areas are weaker than others does it defeat the purpose entirely or will it (for the most part help).

I'm concerned about some spots (doors, electrical boxes, can lights).

Will my efforts mitigate the sound reduction or will these open spots render the whole thing in vain.
Every little bit helps. It's definitely a misconception that many people have that holes in a soundproofing shell or flanking will completely invalidate the effort. Nope. It all helps.

BUT!!! A word of caution. What holes in your soundproofing shell do is reduce the stated effectiveness of a solution. That is, if you have a wall assembly that is predicted to be STC 55 and you stick a bunch of outlets in it without putty pads (or some other sealing mechanism), then you'll end up with a wall that is still notably better than a "normal" wall, but it won't be STC 55 anymore. If you paid extra money to achieve a certain level, then you may not be getting maximum bang for your buck.

This typically only really starts mattering at the upper end. If you paid a considerable amount to get an STC 100 solution and a contractor left a piece that connected up two parts that shouldn't be and that reduced your effectiveness to STC 70, then you would have wasted possibly thousands of dollars. If your goals are just "want it to be quieter" and you're not spending a lot, then a little degradation won't matter much.

BTW, why only one layer of DW on the ceiling? And if you're splurging on Green Glue, then why not spend a little extra time to seal off the doors, electrical boxes, and lights?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Your overall plan, going cheap on some walls and ceiling and not addressing your wall penetrations makes me concerned that you will be disappointed. You can only use the old saying, better than nothing, Hard to tell now much better. If it addresses 20% of the issue would you think it a fair return on your investment?
By doors, I meant the door leading into the room will be treated but connected door to the downstairs bedroom will be regular and the drywall in the bedroom ceiling will be regular.

So putty on the outlets, treatments on the doors, boxes over the can lights will make things markedly better?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Every little bit helps. It's definitely a misconception that many people have that holes in a soundproofing shell or flanking will completely invalidate the effort. Nope. It all helps.

BUT!!! A word of caution. What holes in your soundproofing shell do is reduce the stated effectiveness of a solution. That is, if you have a wall assembly that is predicted to be STC 55 and you stick a bunch of outlets in it without putty pads (or some other sealing mechanism), then you'll end up with a wall that is still notably better than a "normal" wall, but it won't be STC 55 anymore. If you paid extra money to achieve a certain level, then you may not be getting maximum bang for your buck.

This typically only really starts mattering at the upper end. If you paid a considerable amount to get an STC 100 solution and a contractor left a piece that connected up two parts that shouldn't be and that reduced your effectiveness to STC 70, then you would have wasted possibly thousands of dollars. If your goals are just "want it to be quieter" and you're not spending a lot, then a little degradation won't matter much.

BTW, why only one layer of DW on the ceiling? And if you're splurging on Green Glue, then why not spend a little extra time to seal off the doors, electrical boxes, and lights?
The more I think about it I'll do 2 layers on the ceiling but no green glue. Green glue for the ceiling is Too expensive given my budget. I'm hoping that clips and hat channels give me the most bang for my buck.

Also, I'll have some insulation between the joists. Either denim or standard fiberglass.

I'll post a layout soon and maybe we can figure out where I can get the most for my money. I don't want to spend $500 then try to save $50 and make the whole $500 worth $100.

Thanks for the input and I know it seems kinda cheap but I'm trying to keep it in budget.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
don't overlook the duct work as it can carry sound from one room to another.
Great point! All I've seen is mufflers that are about 200 a piece.

I was thinking insluated flex on their own runs. Are there any cheaper options than the "mufflers"?
 

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At a minimum, I recommend reading the links in the first post of The Soundproofing Master Thread. They are excellent introductions to soundproofing and really are must-read for anybody getting into it.
 

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Great point! All I've seen is mufflers that are about 200 a piece.

I was thinking insluated flex on their own runs. Are there any cheaper options than the "mufflers"?
Insulated flex is good. A register box lined with sound absorbing material and oversize the vents to slow air speed (quieter) . You can DIY register boxes.

Pics in bacon race thead.
 

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Great point! All I've seen is mufflers that are about 200 a piece.

I was thinking insluated flex on their own runs. Are there any cheaper options than the "mufflers"?
Insulated flex is good. A register box lined with sound absorbing material and oversize the vents to slow air speed (quieter) . You can DIY register boxes.

Pics in bacon race thread.
 
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