AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
synopsis review from Michael Eisner:


"

Earlier this week, I spoke to the convention of the National Association of Broadcasters on the occasion of the NAB inducting "The Wonderful World of Disney" into its Broadcasting Hall of Fame._ I took the occasion to discuss our view of the coming digital transformation of the entertainment industry.


Back in 1990, we declared that our company was on the eve of the "Disney Decade," and we made good on that pledge with tremendous growth and expansion of the company's physical infrastructure._ Thirteen years later, we are once again at the beginning of a vast and exciting period of opportunity . . . what we expect will be a Digital Decade for us at Disney.


The digital transition will have enormous implications across our businesses -- from theme parks to film to consumer products._ Consider what it will mean for our movie studio._ In the analog world, this business focuses on a structured sequence of release windows -- from theatrical to video to pay-per-view to premium cable to network broadcast to syndication, etc._ In the digital world, we will have to re-think and compress this sequencing in order to adjust to the fact that digital delivery will make possible quicker and more direct distribution to consumers.


We have already taken meaningful steps along the digital path._ ABC is the only broadcast network airing shows in full, true HDTV including Dolby 5.1 surround sound._ All of ABC's primetime scripted series are now in HDTV, as well as much of our "event" programming -- the Super Bowl and the Academy Awards, as well as the Stanley Cup and NBA Finals._ Most importantly, ABC will broadcast Monday Night Football in HD in the upcoming season._ Just as "The Wonderful World of Color" (a predecessor to "The Wonderful World of Disney") was a catalyst for the adoption of color television by consumers, we expect that "Monday Night Football" will play an equally critical role in the acceptance of HDTV.


Later this year, Disney will test market a new service called "Movie Beam" that uses leftover broadcast "bits" to download recent theatrical movies into set-top boxes._ This will make it possible for consumers to choose from 100 different films to view any time they wish, with all the functionality of a DVD.


Digital technology will enable us to offer our advertisers targeted ads that bring new value to our medium._ And, most significantly, it will make it possible to interact with viewers in a way that could truly transform the television medium.


I felt it was appropriate to discuss our plans for the digital future, since the "The Wonderful World of Disney" (which has actually had seven names since Walt started the show in 1954 under the name of "Disneyland") has consistently exemplified our company's ongoing tradition of seizing the opportunities of new technology.__ After all, Walt Disney launched the Sunday night show because he understood the significance of television when most studio heads were running away from it._ Then, in 1960, he understood the importance of broadcasting in color, when most others resisted it.


Now, we are continuing this legacy as we recognize the power of digital to lead to new opportunities and growth in the years ahead.


Michael

"




ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
Quote:
synopsis review from Michael Eisner:



Later this year, Disney will test market a new service called "Movie Beam" that uses leftover broadcast "bits" to download recent theatrical movies into set-top boxes...


Now, we are continuing this legacy as we recognize the power of digital to lead to new opportunities and growth in the years ahead.


Michael
"Leftover bits":The real reason for Disney's decision to broadcast in 720p?


Is the FCC really going to allow Disney to start a VOD business on free spectrum donated by Congress on behalf of the taxpayers?


I wonder how the MSO's and satellite providers feel about this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
439 Posts
The ATSC standard has a standard for OTA encrypted premium service. I don't know what the weigh in by the FCC, or if the FCC does rubber stamp it, would congress want to have some oversight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,531 Posts
tmitch,


Not only would the FCC allow it, they are encouraging it. Broadcasters are encouraged to find new and innovative revenue models within the confines of the broadcast standards we have (conditional access or pay tv is an optional part of the ATSC standard).


The spectrum isn't really free, and the broadcasters don't own it; they hold a license to do what they want based on the assumption that they satisfy certain public service obligations. In addition to the free broadcast television feed--which has just as many commercials as most cable channels--broadcasters perform various services for their local communities (local news, local weather, educational services, etc). And, of course, broadcasters pay a good deal in taxes too.


When we finally get the spectrum auction, companies will pay for these licenses. They will have no public service obligations whatsoever. They won't have to provide any service for free, and most likely, you'll pay $$$ for the commercial cellular, Internet / data, car navigation, and mobile video services delivered with this spectrum. Companies using this spectrum will face less regulation and may pay less in taxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,604 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by tmitchmd
"Leftover bits":The real reason for Disney's decision to broadcast in 720p?


Is the FCC really going to allow Disney to start a VOD business on free spectrum donated by Congress on behalf of the taxpayers?
FCC Rules require only ONE stream (HD IS NOT A REQUIREMENT) be free. The rest is left up to the broadcaster to do what he wants.

Quote:
I wonder how the MSO's and satellite providers feel about this.
They ain't real keen on it and have mounted a lobby with the FCC to STOP a requirement for them to carry more than ONE source of a station, no matter whether it is digital or analog much less multiple digital streams hence the low number of MSO's who carry the digital channel of stations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,303 Posts
Rules have already been put into place requiring that broadcasters pay a percentage (5%, I believe) of any revenues from non-broadcast services offered over their digital TV channels. So indeed the "movie beam" service will be allowed -- and the government will get a portion of the take from it.


As for satellite and cable -- they have no reason to care about this one way or another (other than as potential competition for their own PPV and VOD services). Every version of digital "must carry" that I've seen discussed would apply only to a station's free broadcasts. Thus, even if cable is required to carry broadcast multi-casts, they still wouldn't be required to carry something like "movie beam" that is a subscription service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,172 Posts
When are these brlliant shows like "The Bachelor" and such going to be in HD, though, Mike? I mean that is the real question, isn't it? :)


[OK, not really, but it would be lovely if Survivor were done in HD. I realize that's hard to do, but still.]


Now, in all fairness to Disney/ABC, they have certainly made the HD commitment for OTA and this is true despite the fact that next to none of us are watching. And the 720p decision was made on perceived technical merit, not "leftover bits."


I think time and technology has borne out that the technical merit argument still can't be conclusively determined one way or the other and that HD sports can be well done in 1080i. In fact, if Disney was making the decision today, they'd probably go 1080i for standardization purposes.


But what's done is done. If they want to try some new service to send PPVs with the billions of unused bits (from the countless hours of the day without HD), let them try.


Mark
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top