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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this the right forum section for this topic?


I seem to be tripping a breaker. I am using a 15 amp circuit amp connected to a 15 amp arc-fault circuit interrupter breaker which I been told are known for tripping. I guess I'm putting too much power on that amp. After it tripped I can't get any power with what it's powering.


Everything connected to that circuit amp:

Pioneer Elite Kuro PRO-151FD 60" inch plasma

Comcast HD CATV

Recessed ceiling lighting

Hallway light
 

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I also don't see a question, but if it were my home, I would take out the afci as soon as the inspector leaves. Again, not official advice, but this is what I would do.


Carl
 

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I'd go with what fedders wrote.

AFCI's are nasty devices. It's not current that trips an AFCI, it has a little computer (very little) that looks at the AC power signal, watching for what it thinks are arcs & sparks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater /forum/post/19516959


I'd go with what fedders wrote.

AFCI's are nasty devices. It's not current that trips an AFCI, it has a little computer (very little) that looks at the AC power signal, watching for what it thinks are arcs & sparks.

What if the AFCI breaker is right and it's detecting some abnormalities and it's something in the wiring?
 

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in most areas, 15 and 20 wiring uses the same gauge of wire, so replacing the 15 amp with a 20 amp breaker would be the easiest long term solution.


That said, if you're asking these questions, should you really be messing around with power and electricity? Mistakes kill.
 

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Quote:
in most areas, 15 and 20 wiring uses the same gauge of wire, so replacing the 15 amp with a 20 amp breaker would be the easiest long term solution.


That said, if you're asking these questions, should you really be messing around with power and electricity? Mistakes kill.

I am not sure what most areas means, but around here nobody runs #12 wire to put it on a 15 amp circuit. IMO that is incredibly irresponsible advice to give to someone particularly when they probably don't understand the fundamentals of electrical installations.


The best course of action would be to unplug the electronic equipment and turn the lights on and see if that causes a trip. You could also try plugging in a different electrical device such as a lamp into the outlet the electronic equipment is plugged into to see if it still trips. I wouldn't blindly remove the AFCI without at least doing some investigation to rule out wiring problems.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by scameron81 /forum/post/0



I am not sure what most areas means, but around here nobody runs #12 wire to put it on a 15 amp circuit. IMO that is incredibly irresponsible advice to give to someone particularly when they probably don't understand the fundamentals of electrical installations.


The best course of action would be to unplug the electronic equipment and turn the lights on and see if that causes a trip. You could also try plugging in a different electrical device such as a lamp into the outlet the electronic equipment is plugged into to see if it still trips. I wouldn't blindly remove the AFCI without at least doing some investigation to rule out wiring problems.

Good points, all.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimiety /forum/post/0


in most areas, 15 and 20 wiring uses the same gauge of wire, so replacing the 15 amp with a 20 amp breaker would be the easiest long term solution.


That said, if you're asking these questions, should you really be messing around with power and electricity? Mistakes kill.

Not around here. (California). And if you do put in 12 gauge then you have to use 20 amp outlets and switches, regardless of the breaker because the terminals need to accept 12 gauge.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtara
Not around here. (California). And if you do put in 12 gauge then you have to use 20 amp outlets and switches, regardless of the breaker because the terminals need to accept 12 gauge.
This isn't true - you can install 15 amp devices and breaker with 12ga wire. You should be using screw terminals anyway and they accept both sizes. You can always install thicker gauge wire than code requires (if you want). It is just rarely done.


Carl
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oppopioneer /forum/post/19512252


Is this the right forum section for this topic?


I seem to be tripping a breaker. I am using a 15 amp circuit amp connected to a 15 amp arc-fault circuit interrupter breaker which I been told are known for tripping. I guess I'm putting too much power on that amp. After it tripped I can't get any power with what it's powering.


Everything connected to that circuit amp:

Pioneer Elite Kuro PRO-151FD 60" inch plasma

Comcast HD CATV

Recessed ceiling lighting

Hallway light


What I would do is unplug everything on that circuit and see if it still resets and holds.


If the breaker holds and the lights work I would plug every device back in individually to see if they trip the breaker.


If the breaker hold for each one I would see how much current each one draws to see what the total amount is.


I have seen breakers get worn down over time and trip with less current than rated for.
 
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