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Discussion Starter #1
I have great surge protection at the entry to my home and at each electrical panel. I have had the ground checked to ensure that it is very high quality. I also have good cable modem protection at the entry to the home and at the entry to the cable modem.

There is an extensive collection of networks in the house, with dozens of POE devices (including external security cameras, Crestron controlled remote devices, etc). I was planning on adding several gas discharge tube based devices similar to these so that I don't get unexpected surges traveling through the CAT6 networks/devices (a friend got some equipment fried when lightning hit near his home and traveled through his security camera setup):

http://www.l-com.com/surge-protecto...1000-base-t-gas-tube-cat6-lightning-protector

My question: how should I go about grounding these devices (they have a lug on the rear)?

All the expensive equipment I am trying to protect is in a series of racks in the same equipment room, as are all of the network switches, routers, and POE power supply devices.

I could ground them to the racks? Alternatively, it seems like I ought to be able to purchase (or make?) something that would provide a ground wire via a single wire plug into the same electrical outlet the associated gear is plugged into?

Advice?
 

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Where is your main house panel grounded? Most go to a cold water pipe... With a clamp of sorts. Trace your house panel main ground, should be a visible bare ground wire - # 6 bare or possibly larger. Some homes may have their main ground going to an outside ground rod buried into the earth. Have a peek and reply again. Maybe with a pic.
Hope I am offering some help.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Where is your main house panel grounded? Most go to a cold water pipe... With a clamp of sorts. Trace your house panel main ground, should be a visible bare ground wire - # 6 bare or possibly larger. Some homes may have their main ground going to an outside ground rod buried into the earth. Have a peek and reply again. Maybe with a pic.
Hope I am offering some help.
Main house is grounded near the service entrance behind a detached garage. It is grounded to a large diameter approximately ten foot rod that was sunk into the ground.

The equipment closet all the gear is located in is a good 75 feet away on the second story, and, there is no nearby plumbing in that room.

All the gear in the equipment room is fed by a Richard Gray 50amp UPS which is located in the room, so, there must be a ground either coming out of that device or feeding that device (this device feeds a dedicated 50amp panel with several circuit breakers):


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...m94Ef_Bd5hkq6-RzhaBi4rw&bvm=bv.90491159,d.cGU
 

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The surge protection devices work by conducting the energy of the lightning strike to earth. When the voltage of the line exceeds a specified level, the device starts conducting and essentially connects the line to the ground. If you bond the surge protector to the rack, that means the strike energy will travel from the UTP cable, through the rack, hopefully it will find a power supply chassis properly connected to the rack to find its way into the electrical system ground, and from there, to earth through your ground rod. So that's not the best choice.

Connecting it to the ground bar at your UPS panel is not ideal, but better than the rack option. At least you know that you have a solid path to earth (assuming the panel and the UPS were properly installed). It's not ideal because you essentially bring the lightning strike into a panel which was installed to protect your equipment (through the UPS).

The best thing you can do is to connect the surge protector as close as possible to the ground rod. If that's not feasible, you could install a second ground rod closer to the equipment room, but you will have to bond those two rods together. That may be easier, since it will be done outside of the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The surge protection devices work by conducting the energy of the lightning strike to earth. When the voltage of the line exceeds a specified level, the device starts conducting and essentially connects the line to the ground. If you bond the surge protector to the rack, that means the strike energy will travel from the UTP cable, through the rack, hopefully it will find a power supply chassis properly connected to the rack to find its way into the electrical system ground, and from there, to earth through your ground rod. So that's not the best choice.

Connecting it to the ground bar at your UPS panel is not ideal, but better than the rack option. At least you know that you have a solid path to earth (assuming the panel and the UPS were properly installed). It's not ideal because you essentially bring the lightning strike into a panel which was installed to protect your equipment (through the UPS).

The best thing you can do is to connect the surge protector as close as possible to the ground rod. If that's not feasible, you could install a second ground rod closer to the equipment room, but you will have to bond those two rods together. That may be easier, since it will be done outside of the house.
I broke down and scheduled a master electrician to come by and help. I'll update this thread later to help folks searching the forum. Appreciate the help.
 
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