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The knowledge of everyone on these forums is a little intimidating but I keep reading daily hoping to absorb a little!! That said, here's a dumb question.....do I have to have a big old electric outlet installed in the middle of my wall in order to conceal the cord behind the plasma screen? Can the cord/plug that comes with the screen be changed to a type that would be considered fireproof and could be safely brought through the wall with the other wires?
 

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If you really want to do it correctly, run a dedicated circuit from either a sub-panel or the main panel. Install two separate conduits inside the wall(at least 1" in dia.) for the power cord (in one) and the video in the other.


You are going to have to put a hole in the wall which is not as bad as you may feel. You're not going to see it at all. Get a couple of plastic outlet boxes with the wings that screw out. Run the cable, arguably the hardest part of this especially if you are running in an outside wall. You could combine the cables but then you "run" the risk of RF/EMI interference. Keep them spaced apart as far as possible (mine are about 2-3" until they hit the box).


Cable runs, that you attach to the wall, are available , but, IMHO, don't look as clean and professional as a good wall install. It's a plasma, show it off.:D
 

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Rich -

Are you saying that it is OK to run the power cord in the wall if it runs through a conduit, this meets standard code? I thought only approved wire was allowed in walls (like romex). I want to run the power cord through a wall to the other side where my HT equipment is in a closet. (Actually I cut a hole in the wall below the plasma where I will be installing shelves so only the front of the equipment shows and all of the ugly wires are in the closet, but easy to get to. If wanted I will post a picture when complete)This way I could plug it into my surge protector.

- Dan
 

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I am not saying its standard code....I would think, however, that the conduit would actually be better than the special cable that you are talking about. I do know people that have run conduit in their houses so that it is easier to pull a new line. So, maybe it is code. I'm not an electrician, just my .02 on what I have done and seen.
 

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You are correct, you are not allowed to run either the power cord or an extension cord through the wall. Both are considered Flexible Cords as covered by NEC Article 400.


"400.8 Uses Not Permitted. . . . flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following:


"(2) Where run through holes in walls, . . . ceilings. . . , or floors. . . .

"(4) Where attached to building surfaces. . . .

"(5) Where concealed by walls, floors, or ceilings. . . .

"(6) Where installed in raceways. . . ."


Note that (4) prohibits you from even attaching the cord to the outside wall surface.


Be aware that Romex, while recognized by NEC, is specifically prohibited by many townships. A better choice might be armored cable (also known as BX or type AC). Get the BX with a green grounding conductor in it in addition to the black (hot) & white (neutral) conductors.


If you already have a receptacle below the TV, extending the circuit up the wall to a new receptacle behind the TV using BX is a snap if you're relatively handy, or cheap to have a handyman install -- my guess is about $100 to $200 tops. Usually you can do it with no patching or painting required of the wall surface.


Your signal cables, on the other hand, may be run through the wall without conduit. They are covered under Article 800, which permits you to use about whatever kind of wire you want for them so long as they are less than 50'. One key exception -- special (and rather expensive) cable types are required to run through HVAC ducts or plenums per NEC 300.22).
 

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Just curious, Where is type NMC (ROMEX) not allowed in residential wooden structures less than 3 stories. I am in Upstate New York, Syracuse I am proud to say, and I have never heard its use not permitted. I think the metal clad cable you speak of is called type MC. BX is not permitted by NEC due to the fact it has an undersized ground, Phased out in the late 80's I believe.
 

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peebee - thanks, that is the information I wanted. It is easy to run a receptacle behind the plasma (I haven't yet replaced the sheet rock on the closet side of the wall). BUT I wanted to surge protect the plasma (P50). Any suggestions? There is limited room between the plasma and the wall.

- Dan
 

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What if you were to cut a small hole all the way through the wall and finish the edges all the way through so it would just be an opening similar to a really small window or door way (granted this would only be the size of a double outlet electrical box). Could you then just lay any wires through the opening?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by meldari
BUT I wanted to surge protect the plasma (P50). Any suggestions? There is limited room between the plasma and the wall.

- Dan
Why not just do the whole house. Have an electrician install a whole house protector (they run a couple of hundred). You would end up spending, I would think, ~$300. I had this done on the main panel and had the electrician run a 100 amp sub panel for lighting/power to the shed and for future endeavors (the HT is right above the sub-panel so maybe a dedicated ciruit, hot tub, etc.). Cost ~$500 in total.

http://www.smarthome.com/4860.html
 
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