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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title says, I've finally reached the point where I can get my electrical rough-in inspection done. I think I'm safe as far as I can tell, but can anyone who has experience let me know of any 'gotchas' that I could have overlooked?



TIA.
 

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The most obvious things the inspectors around here look at are:


Cables secured within 8" of box

Nail plate protectors where routing hole is within 1 1/4" of edge

All holes in horizontal sills plugged with fire caulk or rock wool

Box Fill capacity not exceeded

No inaccessible boxes

No Low voltage and AC mixed in the same box
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I have that all covered.


One quick question....


I did install a Central Vac system two weekends ago. I didn't bother installing a box for a splice (using wirenuts) for the low voltage wiring that controls the on/off functions of the central vac. Are they inclined to inspect this wiring as well?
 

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My advice ... Cross your fingers ... And sacrificing a live chicken can't hurt! ;)


Seriously. My inspector did not even look at or care about the low-voltage stuff. I pretty sure low voltage does not have to be in conduits or boxes, just be sure the wire is in-wall rated.


Also be sure you have put wire nuts on all of the ground wire connections, as well as grounding the junction boxes, if they are metal.


Inspectors will be very swayed by first impressions. Be sure all of the wiring is neatly routed. Nice right angle bends in the wires so they run vertically or horizontally. No sagging wiring. If it looks professional, they will treat it as if it was done professionally. Clean up the construction site before your inspection. They don't like to see sloppy work environments.
 

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If it's in the room and exposed, then I would bet they check it. You really should have a box for it. You can either run new wires to avoid the splice, or add a box. If you aren't worried about the connection, add a box for the inspection, then remove it after the inspection. Just hope they don't notice the missing box during the drywall inspection.
 

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At my first rough-in inspection, My inspector wanted to see all of the grounds wires finished which I hadn't completed. What they wanted is that in any box where multiple cables were involved he wanted the grounds secured. I bought a crimper and some copper crimp sleeves. I Crimped and twisted the grounds tightly together providing the appropriate number of pigtails and left hanging out of the boxes. The next inspection (the insulation inspection) he examined about 25% of the boxes randomly, they all passed and he signed off on the electrical rough-in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice guys.


My only problem with the low voltage wiring is that one of the wires (which runs to the top floor) isn't long enough which leaves it right in the middle of the planned bulkhead with no room to attach a box. My plan was that once the bulkhead was drywalled that I was going to install an access panel in case I needed access to the wiring. I'm going to try and pretty it up as much as possible tonight and hope he doesn't see it.
 

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I would guess Toronto would have pretty tough inspectors. Inspections will vary from location to location, and within location from inspector to inspector. Inpectors in my location never inspect the low voltage stuff, not even to see if it is fire-rated. They are pretty tough on the other electrical stuff though.
 

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Mancubus, I might depend on the inspector as to how much poking around he does. The two inspectors that came to my house spent about 15 minutes between them for both the rough and final inspection. No problems encountered, I think they are interested in obvious flaws and safety issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok, the inspector just came and left. He probably spent a total of 5 minutes here.


He passed me but he did mention a couple of issues. One being the mounting of the device boxes. He said that I should have some sort of backing behind the boxes to give them some support since I'm using metal studs. Chris, did you have to do that and if so, what did you use? If you didn't do this, do you find that the device boxes move when you press on them?
 

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I can see it on a staggered stud wall. If the studs have drywall on each side, they shouldn't need additional support
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, one of the walls (the interior theater wall) is staggered stud, the others he was concerned about were the outer walls against the concrete.


Any ideas as to what would be the best to use in order to provide some support?


TIA.
 

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3/4 inch plywood cut to fit in a vertical plane and attached horizontally is often used to stiffen a steel stud wall and is used where a nailer is needed. Steel or wood stud material can also be cut to fit between studs as a horizontal stiffener. Screw both sides of the stud into the stiffener. See if you can get some construction adhesive between the studs and the concrete wall.


Steel studs are designed to use the wall material attached to them to keep them from twisting.
 

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No, I didn't have to do that. I used the plastic boxes and they are screwed to the studs. I did run some 2x2's behind the studs to mount the Romex on. Like we said earlier "it depends on the inspector" :) You did get a pass though so you probably don't have to do it and once you get the drywall up it shouldn't be a problem. My boxes do not move.....
 
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