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Okay I have read through a lot of information on both of these sets. Just was hoping for some opinions on which one you would buy. With the $500 rebate going on I can pick up a 530 for about 2499. And I have read you can get the Panny for about 2k at Sears.


How often would I need to calibrate the 530HD?


Is burn in a real problem and is it eliminated by going with the Panny?


I'm starting to think it may be better just to be the uniformed buy it at Best Buy consumer at this point.
 

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I'd be curious as well. I'm in a similar position.


I like the size and ergonimics of the Panny, but from the content I've been able to view on both, I was more impressed with the PQ from the Pioneer. Problem is, I'm viewing both with little or no calibration so neither is an optimal picture. Tough to weigh them against each other when you can't truely see how they will compare.
 

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I am in the same boat, exactly. My current set is a hd crt rptv, and I remain impressed with the smooth "liquid" picture. I have not a single complaint, other than the size, which I find too small now that most of my viewing is true high-def. I have tried to like the Panasonic, but I find the picture just too "electronic" looking, and I keep noticing the screen door. I plan to get the Elite. I know it will be a classic for years to come.
 

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Pioneer Elites look great with just some good setup using a setup DVD, and look fantastic when ISF calibrated.


Burn in is only a problem if you don't take some very simple precautions on how you use the set.

I'm going on 3 years plus on my Elite, and there is not even the slightest hint of any burn in at all on the set.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SerhC



Is burn in a real problem and is it eliminated by going with the Panny?

Burn in is not a realistic expectation or problem. Don't let it be the deciding factor... the myth of burn in is very over exaggerated on these forums.



Burn in usually takes weeks or months.... Not hours.


Most people are ignorant of what burn in really is and why it happens; Burn in is nothing more than uneven wearing of the phosphors on the CRT face plate.


If- for example- You were to leave that black and white on screen menu up for a long period of time. (say a week or two) the areas of the white lines from the On Screen Menu would wear faster than the areas of the black screen. So- When you watched somthing else, where that white lines were would be a different level of brightness than other parts of the screen and you would be able to see the "burn in" in that area.


Now- If you were to play that same DVD on screen menu for 1 hour a day constant followed by 12 hours of normal viewing.... you could repeat this over and over and over again for 12-36 months without burn in.


Because.... the CRT would more evenly wear out.


As long as the image changes color and brightness intensity once in a while, the CRT will wear at a more even rate and burn in is not a problem.


I manage a large consumer electronics store; On one Hitachi we used a DVD player with Monster INC. DVD as a demo. This demo started the day Monster INC was realeased (like a year ago) and the TV runs from 8am-10pm everyday except Thanksgiving and Christmas. When the movie is done playing it always returns to the DVD MENU screen, which is black background with white letters and some icons and colors. The DVD would return to this menu many times (more than 6 times) a day. Often it would be as long as an hour or two before someone would notice it and hit the "PLAY" button again.


One year later- This very same RTPV still does not have a hint of "BURN IN" and I can honestly say the TV is beat to crap, driven on 100% contrast for 12 months on a showroom floor, and except for a few individual cases had only *1* DVD movie playing on it for the whole time.


The reason (my theory) why no burn had occured in this very high stress application is becuase as long as the tv was displaying changing pictures periodically, the CRT phoshors wear down at a more similar rate and THUS- NO BURN IN.


Burn in will not happen in an hour or two. It will happen over a period of months. If somone was to watch CNBC for 1 hour everday, but also watched a few hours of non-CNBC... that logo probably won't burn in any time soon. If someone was to watch 3-5 hours of CNBC then shut off the TV and repeat that the very next day..... over and over... then BURN IN will occur.


As long as the CRT's are given proper ability to wear evenly.. then burn in will not occur.


For somone who watched 3 hours a Day of CNBC with the logo tickers ont he bottom..... they would want to run the tv an addition couple hours on somthing else... perhaps even just a screen of white noise. This would allow the CRT's to wear more evenly and slow or stop the burn in process.


CRT displays are designed and expected to wear out. A typical Bigscreen CRT should only last about 8 years of normal use before the CRT become too dim and time to replace. They are quite reliable... and most people are more than satisfied with the expected 8 year life span. (given the cost):)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SerhC



How often would I need to calibrate the 530HD?
Convergence should be maintained every 90 days for better than LCD picture quality. You can do this yourself.


Focus, Grayscale, Red Push/ color decoder, SVM and picture settings usually need only be done once (possible again after 2 years... but not needed)


most people don't bother with focus or grayscale.... thats an VIDEOPHILE thing....


Convergence is the only thing you really need to worry about....


Grayscale on an PIO ELITE is already 50 TIMES BETTER than a Panny LCD right out of the BOX!


Don't let the be a factor or deciding factor either.... CRT owners (atleast the veterans here at AVS) are video freaks and talk about calibration and tips becuase they enjoy it as a hobby. When people talk about having grayscale done on thier CRT display.... it does not mean the LCD needs this any less or more....


My expereince is that LCD has much worse grayscale out of the box... than Pioneer ELITE which usually are well calibrated at the factory with regards to grayscale.


As long as your willing to adjust convergence every 90 days for best picture....... I would not worry about calibration at all.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SerhC
Okay I have read through a lot of information on both of these sets. Just was hoping for some opinions on which one you would buy. With the $500 rebate going on I can pick up a 530 for about 2499. And I have read you can get the Panny for about 2k at Sears.


I'm starting to think it may be better just to be the uniformed buy it at Best Buy consumer at this point.
You could get the panny for same price at Best Buy or Circuit City too...


everybody price matches each other...


How about a Hitachi S500?


Cheaper and possibly better (for the money and in my opinion) than Pioneer ELITE.


The S series Hitachi is the best blend of Picture quality, features, and price in all of CRT Kingdom....
 

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SerhC- I cannot speak to the new Panny, as I have not seen it. I was able to achieve an exceptional picture on my PRO510, and I never did get burn in. I would use it with PS2 via the component adapter, and it looked great with these games. I would try to limit the gaming to a couple hours, but most of the current games are designed to limit burn in. I was worried about 4x3 burn in, so I used the various stretch modes depending on the show. Cinema wide is pretty good for most shows, but natural wide was needed for shows with crawl along the bottom.


As far as the need to recalibrate, I found that I had to touch up the convergence every couple of months, but that is something that you can do yourself. I would recommend the TV have an actual ISF type calibration yearly, as the bulbs do indeed drift. Many calibrators will recal their own every few months, but a year seems to be the average when it comes down to actually having paying for it.
 
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