AVS Forum banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,101 Posts
Cinemas actually change the size/dimensions of the screen with moveable borders (curtains) to adjust for the different formats and lens changes ...
Do you still have commercial theaters in the Toronto area that actually have screen masking? I cannot name a single theater in Michigan where this is done anymore. Most screens have been replaced with 1.85:1 aspect screens and 2.39:1 is simply shown with bars top and bottom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Do you still have commercial theaters in the Toronto area that actually have screen masking? I cannot name a single theater in Michigan where this is done anymore. Most screens have been replaced with 1.85:1 aspect screens and 2.39:1 is simply shown with bars top and bottom.
That's a good question as I haven't been in many cinemas for quite some time....showing my age...lol....:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Looks like a lost art.... :(

http://screencrush.com/theaters-screen-masking/

"There’s a reason why theaters have masked their screens for half a century. A key one is explained in this excerpt from a smart 2015 article by Jonathan Lack about the chain in his area, Cinemark, doing away with the practice:
When a widescreen image is properly masked, it ideally creates an ‘immersive’ viewing experience – this was the idea behind anamorphic widescreen, when it was initially introduced as ‘Cinemascope’ in 1953. The image is as wide as the human eyespan, allowing a viewer’s vision to be completely consumed by the screen ... when you project a Scope image onto a Flat display with letterboxing, that effect is lost. The image itself is still wide, but it is now bordered by thick, visible bars, and rather than feeling immersed, the viewer is prone to notice how the image is ‘confined’ by these visual boundaries. Unlike black curtains, these letterboxed bars – which are, in these cases, hard-coded into the image, projected alongside the film itself – are not ‘invisible’ when one watches a movie. They are very visible indeed, and especially for a film-literate viewer like myself, they can prove incredibly distracting.
A properly masked 2D movie is just as immersive as 3D. An improperly masked 2D movie looks flatter, and less convincing in its illusion of depth. It’s one more barrier between us and the world of the movie, one more thing to get past before you can give yourself over completely to the film. And I personally find that shots that accentuate the boundaries of the frame in unmasked movies, like extreme close-ups, draw my eye up to the black bars, and repeatedly distract me from the story."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Out of curiosity, what are people in the community doing to achieve the look of the film "filling" the entire screen like a movie theater you walk into
Well to answer the OPs question with a readily available solution,

........
I believe our 1440s have a "digital" zoom feature and format selection (I'll need to double check) which may allow "wide format" to be adjusted to fill a 16:9 screen but with obvious distortion of the image.
............
.......just did a quick check at lunchtime and the 1440 indeed does have the capability to "digitally" zoom in to fill the top and bottom with no bleed outside of the screen, the widescreen image is obviously cut on either side but the 16:9 screen is filled and without distorting the image. :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,749 Posts
Well to answer the OPs question with a readily available solution,

.......just did a quick check at lunchtime and the 1440 indeed does have the capability to "digitally" zoom in to fill the top and bottom with no bleed outside of the screen, the widescreen image is obviously cut on either side but the 16:9 screen is filled and without distorting the image. :)
Thanks for confirming what @dreamer quoted from the 1440 user manual in post #2 of this thread. The OP did not seem to show interest in chopping off the sides of a 2.35:1 movie in order to expand the image to vertically fill the screen. Reminds me of the early days of 16:9 TV screens when many people still had 4:3 TVs and DVD movies were available in two different versions with aspect ratios that were either native 16:9 "widescreen" or 4:3 "fullscreen" with the sides chopped off. I accidentally bought a "fullscreen" version thinking that must be 16:9 and was disappointed to get a chopped off 4:3 version. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Thanks for confirming what @dreamer quoted from the 1440 user manual in post #2 of this thread.
""Zoom" mode will expand everything and you will lose part of the movie off the sides as it fills the screen top to bottom. "
Thanks....that's the one line I missed...:(...well at least I did confirm it and it actually works quite well....

"What am I doing wrong? Why can't the picture fill the entire screen? "

As far I can tell all the bases have been covered, I guess its up to the OP as to what works best.......and then I can chip in about the use of ND filters.:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,749 Posts
@rob80b, another forum member just asked about having a temporary mount for an ND filter and I had forgotten about your setup. Maybe you can help him out in the other thread:

avsforum.com/forum/68-digital-projectors-under-3-000-usd-msrp/2917358-easily-swap-ndf-benq-ht2150st.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
@rob80b , another forum member just asked about having a temporary mount for an ND filter and I had forgotten about your setup. Maybe you can help him out in the other thread:

avsforum.com/forum/68-digital-projectors-under-3-000-usd-msrp/2917358-easily-swap-ndf-benq-ht2150st.html
Will do and have done. :)
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top