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I've been reading a review on the Secrets site indicating the Epson 5030B has a neutral density filter which is applied in some modes to cut down light and help black levels.

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/proj...-3d-projector-review/page-5-on-the-bench.html

Anyone know if this is indeed the case?

If so, presumably you could add your own to some of their other models like the 3500 to cut down the light and improve blacks?
 

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I've been reading a review on the Secrets site indicating the Epson 5030B has a neutral density filter which is applied in some modes to cut down light and help black levels.

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/proj...-3d-projector-review/page-5-on-the-bench.html

Anyone know if this is indeed the case?

If so, presumably you could add your own to some of their other models like the 3500 to cut down the light and improve blacks?
You can add a ND filter to any thing. Throw one on your flashlight to cut down on that annoying glare. ;)

ND filters cut down on light across the board. It brings down highlights as well as black levels, so contrast ratios should remain the same. But, it won't increase shadow details, color accuracy, or any other issues the projector may have. So, the 3500 is no 5030 from the start. It's far more than the internal filters which are on the projector.

The only reason to use a ND filter is if you find that the projector is overly bright for your screen size and normal calibration can't bring down the light level enough to make it acceptable. On typical screen sizes of 100-120 inches, this is typically not an issue, but certain projectors are really bright and tough to bring down the light levels from them. In those cases, a ND filter is a good option.

ND filters are available from B&H Photo - and you want a decent quality GLASS filter.
 
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