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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Epson Home Cinema 1440 now replaced with the announcement of the Home Cinema 1450.

Basically the same machine as the previous model with an output up 4200 lumens but FWIW the contrast is now quoted at 15,000 up from 10,000 and bulb life on ECO increased to 10,000 hrs, two positive updates but the Faroudja DCDi Cinema labeling from the 1440 has been removed so no indication if it is still included or if the picture quality, which is IMHO very good on the 1440, is the same.

http://www.projectorreviews.com/the-art-of-home-theater-projectors/epsons-new-home-cinema-1450-projector-evolutionary-affordable/
https://epson.com/For-Home/Projectors/Home-Cinema/Home-Cinema-1450-1080p-3LCD-Projector/p/V11H836020
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Why wouldn't you use the projectors 16:9 setting?
Would be great but there is no setting as such ..... a 16:10 projector produces an extra amount of pixels on the top and bottom when watching 16:9 not much one can do, similar to watching 2:34 with a 16:9 projector.

See bottom of photo (before placing black stripe)
 

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Would be great but there is no setting as such ..... a 16:10 projector produces an extra amount of pixels on the top and bottom when watching 16:9 not much one can do, similar to watching 2:34 with a 16:9 projector.

See bottom of photo (before placing black stripe)
Humm... :confused: Well, it's on page 71 of the manual. It's accessed under the "Signal" section of the menu, sub-menu, "Aspect". And, it's the button labeled "ASPECT" or number "8" on the remote. If you press the remote button, it will page through the various image aspect ratio settings.

I have an Epson HC1040 which also has 16:10 panels. But, the 16:9 setting works quite well in controlling the over scan for a 16:9 image. Or maybe Epson is selling the HC1440 with out that feature in the Great White North? ;)

Here's a link for the manual just in case...
http://www.projectorcentral.com/pdf/projector_manual_8972.pdf
 

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I thought the 2250 already replaced it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Humm... :confused: Well, it's on page 71 of the manual.
The projector will adjust the projected image size accordingly but still continue to create dark grey bars top and bottom outside the projected image except on "full" which stretches the image to fill 16:10 but to then zoom out to fit into a 16:9 screen produces bars on either side...so a no go.
Does your screen have black borders or do you have maybe a 16:10 screen?
 

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I was the one who posted that the 2250U was replacing the 1440, not knowing a 1450 was coming. Maybe the 2250U is the replacement for the old 1985WU which was similar to the 1440. The 2250U may end up being superior to the 1450 for those who need extra brightness as the 2250U is rated at 5,000 lumens and seems to have all the main features of the 1450. We'll have to see how all the fine details and street pricing work out. Here's a link to the thread I started on the 2250U:

avsforum.com/forum/68-digital-projectors-under-3-000-usd-msrp/2745401-new-epson-2250u-replaces-1440-1985wu.html
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I thought the 2250 already replaced it.
In lumens yes but not as a designated "Home Cinema" projector, not too sure if these are given extra attention to picture fidelity though I have no complaints on the 1440's cinematic quality.
.....but Epson does produce too many similar models.
 

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The 1440 and 1985WU had similar performance so I wouldn't expect the 1450 and 2250U to be too far apart other than maximum lumens. But it's all speculation until we have more data to go on. Based on preliminary data here's what projectorcentral.com shows:

projectorcentral.com/projectors-compare.cfm?add=9893&add=9737
 

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The projector will adjust the projected image size accordingly but still continue to create dark grey bars top and bottom outside the projected image except on "full" which stretches the image to fill 16:10 but to then zoom out to fit into a 16:9 screen produces bars on either side...so a no go.
Does your screen have black borders or do you have maybe a 16:10 screen?
I have a 16:9 and a 2:35 screen. The 16:9 is a VisualApex 144" portable screen and the 2:35 is a fixed Stewart Filmscreen.

We use the 16:9 screen outdoors with the HC1040. When I select the 16:9 aspect on the HC1040, it appears to disable/turn off pixels to format/resize 16:9 from 16:10. A simple zoom movement of the lens frames the image to the screen. I don't really use any other aspect setting save for the occasional 4:3 movie which appears to work the same way.

Since the HC1040 and HC1440 are more or less the same generation of projector from Epson and are using what seems to be the same case/chassis with the major difference being the available lumens and lens, it's hard to believe the 16:9 aspect setting function would be different. At least the two projectors manuals describe the same functions and the HC1440 specifically calls out 1080P/16:9 settings.

Sorry to hear you have a "broken" projector in this regard.
 

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There should be zero difference between using the menu to turn off the extra pixels of a native 16:10 LCD projector when viewing 16:9 content and sending a pure black signal to those pixels as a pure black signal essentially turns the pixels off. In either case there would optimally be black bars. But if the LCD panels don't have great native contrast in either case the unused pixels are going to project bars of the same shade of grey on the screen. In either case the 16:9 image will fill the 16:9 screen viewing area and the grey bars will fall on the top and bottom of the black screen border. The only way to get true black bars with a 16:9 image from a 16:10 LCD projector should be to have either internal or external masking.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Since the HC1040 and HC1440 are more or less the same generation of projector from Epson and are using what seems to be the same case/chassis.

Sorry to hear you have a "broken" projector in this regard.
Do not believe it's defective...If I'm not mistaken it's the size/format of the LCD which determines the pixel count so I'm not too sure how it can can produce 16:9 with the rest blacked out, not grey...but I could be wrong.
The two projectors though are very different..... in size by about an added 50% and weight wise..10.2 lbs to 5.7 lbs...with a hoard of different features... so not too sure where the similarities are except for the 16:10 ratio.
But I'll look into the aspect ratio further.....
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Hi b curry

There may be a miscommunication, yes the extra pixels on the top and bottom are turned off when using 16:9 or native on the 1440 and we'll assume the same for the new 1450 but will still be visible as dark grey beyond the 16:9 borders at the top and bottom if not masked off by using wider black borders on the frame or projection screen to absorb the light.

Basically even though the pixels are turned off the full lcd panels are still charged, like a lcd tv, and therefore emit light, although minor, and may not be obvious unless viewing in a darkened room, what we need are mini oleds. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The 1440 and 1985WU had similar performance so I wouldn't expect the 1450 and 2250U to be too far apart other than maximum lumens.

The 2250 is an upgrade of sort but the direct "business" appointed model to the new 1450 with identical specs excluding the wireless networking is the PowerLite 2245.
https://epson.ca/For-Work/Projectors/Meeting-Room/PowerLite-2245U-Wireless-Full-HD-WUXGA-3LCD-Projector-/p/V11H816020
It’s not really mentioned but hopefully there has been more attention given to the grayscale, color calibration with the Home Cinema units otherwise what’s the point…but as I mentioned, Epson makes way too many derivatives....
 

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@rob80b, when I first discovered the 2250U on the Epson website the 2245U was not listed. I see now that the 1450 and 2245U are both listed at 4,200 lumens while the 2250U is listed at 5,000 lumens. Beyond that there's a 2255U also with 5,000 lumens and a 2265U listed at 5,500 lumens. So, yeah, lots of derivatives of the same basic model. :)
 
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