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For years I have had an equalizer connected to my home audio system; giving me an ideal way to configure the sound for any given room, (tile, carpet, etc). As many of my posts indicated, I am currently upgrading my stuff. No where, on any of the forums, have I heard of anyone using an equalizer with their home theater. WHY??? Does it degrade the channel separation signals? I would think that it would make configuration easier, (lowering peaks, holes and other frequency issues). Sound fields are nice, but I would much rather be able to create a flat line tailored for the room, and then go from there. What are you’re thoughts and comments.


Frank…:confused:
 

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Well I certainly use them and have Yamaha 31 band eqs on my L,C,R and a 2-band parametric on my subs. If I could eq the front and rear surrounds (Yamaha DSP-A1) without investing in four more amps also, I'd do that too.


Using a pink noise source/spectum analyzer/professional noise meter, I eq the three channels flat at the seating position. The parametic helps with standing waves.


LCR speakers are JBL L200s w/075s. Subs include a JBL 15" and a Sunfire Signature.
 

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An equalizer can be a useful addition to a home theater system. It is not however, the first line of defense for achieving a flat response. Proper room design, speaker and listener positioning, and acoustic treatments should all be optimized first.


When applying an equalizer to a system, it is important to understand what equalization can and cannot fix. It cannot fix temporal distortion caused by early reflections; it cannot fill holes and gaps in system and room response. It can be used to selectively reduce peaks and resonance and to even the frequency response between channels.


Proper set up requires instrumentation, at least a real-time spectrum analyzer (RTA), a MLS or swept frequency test set that can show the temporal effects of the room response is even better. Any RTA used should have at least 1/6 octave resolution. Just because there is a slider to adjust for a given frequency, or a parametric channel available, it doesn’t mean it needs to be adjusted. There should be a good reason for applying equalization to that frequency band.


A key difference between a two-channel system and a home theater system is that home theater tends to be a more social activity, requiring that the “sweet spot†cover a large number of seats. The best set up of an equalizer for a home theater system should use frequency domain averaged responses from several representative locations in the room, with the equalizer set to maximize first the linearity and second the SPL of the average response.
 

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The higher end Sony receivers include a 3 band semi-parametric eq that can be independently adjusted for all channels. I wish more manufacturers would incorporate this feature - it makes a huge difference.


Rob
 

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The Pioneer Elite AVRs have a built in multi channel EQ feature called MCACC. It works very well and the set up with the supplied mic is very simple. I assume other high end AVRs or pre/pros have this feature as well.
 

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Don't kill me. This is just my opinion...


I have had several EQ's growing up with 2 channel stereo. They always drove me crazy. Maybe I just never adjusted them properly, but music would sound fine on one recording, then a different album would sound horrible and I would have to re-adjust the EQ to sound better. I usually wound up just turning off the EQ.

My opinion: If you need an equalizer, ther is something wrong with your speakers or speaker placement.

Now, I never use bass or treble controls, much less an EQ. Also never touch the loudness control either. (don't see too many receivers with these today though)
 

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To a certain extent, James may be right.


However, when speaker placement is optimized, equalization will fine tune things to a nice degree.


After watching Mysphyt's sophisticated set up tweaking my room, miking different areas of the room and the complicated software, I had an appreciation for what can be done to improve a properly designed room with optimal speaker placement.


The proof is in the pudding ('er the before and after graphs).
 
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