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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks,


I'm looking for a new DVD player. It will go in a home theater and be used most of the time for movies (I'm not concerned with DVD-A or SACD music capability just yet). I mostly want a great picture.


When I was looking at new players, a few of them had "DTS Digital Out" stamped on them. What does this mean? Does the player not process the DTS audio but passes the signal on to a receiver that then processes it?


I have a new Yamaha RX-V 2400 that can process the various DTS and Dolby modes - so will connecting a player with "Digital Out" only be o.k. with that?


Cheers!
 

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Just for clarity, the DTS digital out means that the DVD player has either a coaxial or an Optical audio output, or both. If you use analog L-R connections from the DVD player you will get Pro Logic at best at the amp input decoding.


If you use the digital out, and your receiver can decode DTS, you will hear Digital Theater Systems decoded audio. It is much better sounding audio, especially concerning channel separation. If you do purchase the DVD player be sure to set the output to DIGITAL versus PCM. This will set the Dolby Digital flag on the receiver correctly. On most DVD players you will have to access the DTS via the splash menu of the DVD. DTS is not nearly as common as Dolby Digital. There are really not that many DTS titles available. It is a real treat when they are encoded with DTS.
 

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>>>If you do purchase the DVD player be sure to set the output to DIGITAL versus PCM.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by djstatik
Just for clarity, the DTS digital out means that the DVD player has either a coaxial or an Optical audio output, or both.
For even more clarity, it means that the player has a digital output which is capable of passing the DTS signal. Although I expect that is true of most players today, that has not always been the case. Just a few years ago many players could only output PCM or Dolby Digital via their digital outputs. The DTS stream was ignored, and could not be decoded nor passed digitally on earlier players.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info. I really appreciate it. I'm building a new home theater for the first time and, well, you know (head spinning, eyes glazed over, clearly suffering from the onset of spec overload induced dementia).


One more question - I ended up getting a Denon 1600 instead of another DVD. As I understand things, the 1600 has an internal Dolby and DTS decoder that can process the signal or can send the signal over the optical link to a receiver for processing. My question is - ready for this :) - Which one wins?


Is there any sort of consensus on which one should be doing the decoding/processing? Is it better to let the "raw" bitstream go to the new receiver (Yamaha 2400) for processing, or let the Denon do it inside the DVD before sending the data to the receiver? Is there any such thing as "one way is better than the other" in this case?


Thanks again and looking forward to your input.


Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In reference to my last post - Is the choice between "which one wins" something that I can even control? Do you actually get to choose which one should process the data if both have decoders? Why wouldn't the Denon - which I imagine "sees" the signal first just go ahead and process it? Can you tell it not to, and would I want to?


Head still spinning.


Thanks!
 

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Which does the decoding depends on the input you select at the receiver. If you select the digital (co-ax or optical) input the receiver does the decoding. If you select the 6.1 analog input the decodign was already done by the DVD player.


9 times out of 10 the receiver will be better, because if you use the analog in most receivers will reconvert to digital, then back to analog before you hear the sound. Digital in only gets the one digital to analog conversion.
 
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