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Discussion Starter #1
Hi


I've been checking out the HDTVs at the local BB stores. I occasionally feel a

slight eye strain when viewing the DLP TVs, especially when watching scenes with

lots of motion. I'm not sure whether this is due to watching a lot of TVs or just a

DLP thing. Has anyone else experienced this ? Could this be due to the lack of

proper calibration on these TVs ? Have folks felt this with just DLPs or with any

HD/big-screen technology ?


On a related note, I do notice some motion artifacts on DLPs (I think this was a

Mitsubishi). watching football highlights. Hopefully the newer Sammys (HLRxx87 ..)

don't exhibit this ?


-j.boyd
 

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I noticed the same thing. I just received the 60XBR and I have headaches after wathving for more than 1/2 hour. I am more than10 feet away from the screen. I did notice on static images, there was less of an issue than quick motion. I'm thinking of returning mine, unfortunately. Would the 50 inch cause the same problem?
 

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A lot of people find that installing a back light improves their viewing and can reduce eye strain and fatigue.


There's a couple of threads (including one very recent) about that discuss various back lights available.


-bruce
 

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Johnyboyd - I recently started a thread a mile long about the horrible eye strain i was experiencing.


A lot of the sets you see in the store are set up in such a way to look better in a store environment, and are screaming for your attention. This means the brightness and contrast are cranked up to their maximums, which is the #1 cause for eye strain.


Outside of that, at home I still was experiencing unbearable strain even when the brightness/contrast were at appropriate settings. Some of the picture pre-setting modes, such as "pro" "movie" etc contain certain sharpness/enhancements that alter the picture to make it look "better." Unfortunately these modes made the display VERY hard to watch. I'm not quite sure why, but with me i noticed the more of the enhancement and junk i got off the screen, the better i was able to watch.


Another important factor. I found that certain colors are easier on the eyes than others - meaning that if the colors weren't balanced correctly one color may dominate and make the screen a little bit harder on your eyes. It's also good if the color temperature is right for this as well.


I don't know the science of why certain things affect the eyes more, nor am i going to make it up, but i do know I have sensitive eyes which means my televisions have to be just right.


Backlighting reduces eye strain in that your eyes are constantly adjusted to it's neutral light output. Movies and television shows often change very quickly from light to dark scenes, and your pupils are contstantly trying to adjust, which tire the muscles. If you have a neutral/bias light source behind your tv, your eye muscles will have much less a hassle running between extreme lights and darks coming from the display. I didn't like the subtle backlighting effect at all, as i thouht it ruined the movie-in-the-dark experience for me, but not everyone agrees with this.


With moving objects giving you headaches etc, viewing distance might be part of this. Seating for HDTV is typically 2 times the screen width, give or take a little.


But I still think if your getting eye strain from even seeing a display on a showroom floor, then what i mentioned above should be the solution. Getting the colors right, getting the brightness/contrast right, and eliminating extraneous edge-enhancements (so that dvd's and broadcasts are in their true/original form) will make your set much easier on the eyes.


The long and short of it, sets NEED to be calibrated in a way that's industry standard yet pleasing to your eyes as well. If you have the knowledge and experience, you can definitely do much of this yourself, otherwise it's sometimes beneficial to pay the 250$ for a professional to do it.
 

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High contrast is usually the problem. The first night watching my Sony A10 (LCD) I had major eye strain the next day.....Now that I made the "iris" more closed, my eyestrain is gone. Also, stores always max out (or darn near) their TV's to make them "look better".
 

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eye strain can also happen due to the size of the tv. i experienced that. when you start watching a bigger tv, your eyes move more since they have to take in the bigger screen. it usually goes away after a couple of days.
 
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