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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The saw dust comes from cutting all the two inch strips of ply wood and MDF to make the frames. I use both plywood and MDF. The plywood is the bottom layer and MDF is the top layer. The Plywood helps with strength and the MDF makes a nice clean 45 degree angle.


More saw dust comes from using the router to create the 45 degree corners.


See the attached photo




I started using Velcro, but after the first two frames switched to liquid nails and a 2 inch brad in each of the corners. With the nail gun set correctly the brad disappear under the fabric. If it is still visible i dab the top of the brad with a black felt tip pen.
 

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Very Nice work, I will going to frames myself, because I prefer that look vs the chair rail. Do you have a pic of a finished frame(pre fabric) and is the finish product 1 or 2 inches thick?


Also is Industrail Velcro being used to hold the frame?


Ozzie
 

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GPowers

Thanks for these pics, the MDF looks like its about 3/4" thick, how thick is the finished product?


I want to use velcro, to make it easy for me to remove if I ever have to recover. Did the velcro give you problems?


Was the fabric cut at the corners in order to avoid a fabric buldge or did you resolve this a different way?


Ozzie
 

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Looks good Greg.


It's much easier to just build the frames on the wall and then add the GOM, poly and cloth, especially if you don't plan to change the panels for a long time.
 
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I sincerly hope that everyone who works with mdf knows about the health issues that can arise when the dust isn't properly handled. GPowers your panels look great.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by GPowers
I like he way these fabric frames are turning out but it is a lot of work and produces tons of sawdust.

Hi Greg,


Couldn't agree more on the mess. However, like you, I like the look of my frames to be sure. I took a completely different angle on my frames because I wanted them to be removable and light but I do like your approach : ) .


Your theater looks very professional and I can tell you build with passion ! Very well done !


Chris
 

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Quote:
More saw dust comes from using the router to create the 45 degree corners.

Ok, as a woodworker I have to ask what the heck are you doing routing 45 degree corners when a table saw will do this quicker and with less dust? A saw blade only cuts roughly an eighth of an inch, a router is cutting out all that waste. And I cannot believe you would have a sharp router blade after a couple of panels.


Other than that, your finished product looks great and very professional! Much better than the typical GOM look I see over and over again on this forum.


Brian
 
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Quote:
Quote:
I sincerly hope that everyone who works with mdf knows about the health issues that can arise when the dust isn't properly handled.

No, What are they?

If I remember correctly MDF is made with Formaldehyde.


Brian
 

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GPowers

You found 1/2" plywood?

I thought 1/2" plywood was not actually 1/2". Like 2 X 4 are not actually 2" by 4".


Also one more pic request if you have it is a close up of one of the panel corners to see how it was wrapped and staple. Preferably the back of one.


Again thanks a bunch, these photos help dummies like me that have never build a thing.



Ozzie
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Brian:


I used the table saw to do the first few frames that only had a horizontal, top and bottom, 45 degree cut. I switched to the router when i needed to do three and four sides of the panel. The table saw just did not produce the look i wanted on the corners etc...


The router bit is still working great and i have done about 40 panels. Can not say that for my 20 year old router. The trigger switch went bad.


The router bit is a Bosch brand and is very large & weighty bit, is was expensive too. Maybe thats why it is still cutting great. The smaller sears bits i have used usually start to burn and over heat.


So i guess it comes down to the tools you have at hand and i do not have a great table saw and the router produced cleaner frames.


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Clay


Thanks, it has been a four year process to get to this point.


My tempoary shop is the office area next to the theater. The nice thing is when it is not raining I do the worod working outside by the pool. But for the past week is has been raining in southern California. So all the sawing and routering has been done in the future office area.


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ozzie:


Here are a few photos of the corners. Very little bulk, the fabric was not cut, just pull around the corners. There is a slight ripple but it is past the 45 degree cut and will not be seen when the frames are pushed against each other.




As you can see the sun is shining again in SoCal so i can keep the saw dust outside.
 
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