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I saw this movie about a week ago at the Esquire Theater near Water Place in Chicago. It sure looked like they were using a DLP to project the image. I never inquired to find out. Anyhow, I thought the story line was okay seeing how it was highly rated. Definitely not the movie for a conservative. It shows how society reacted in the 1950's to a few forbidden taboos. Great New England fall scenery with the colors blazing on the screen.
 

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Originally posted by Tim Wilkins
I saw this movie about a week ago at the Esquire Theater near Water Place in Chicago. It sure looked like they were using a DLP to project the image. I never inquired to find out.
Really? The Esquire? Hard to believe, if only because it is six small, mediocre theaters. Vickie and I see a lot of movies in Chicago, and probably see a dozen films a year at the Esquire. But we don't see films there if it is playing at a better theater.

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Anyhow, I thought the story line was okay seeing how it was highly rated. Definitely not the movie for a conservative.
Probably not. It could cause their heads to explode.

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It shows how society reacted in the 1950's to a few forbidden taboos. Great New England fall scenery with the colors blazing on the screen.
Apparently, they used digital color grading to get that 1950s, Technicolor look. I feel like I should check out a Douglas Sirk film to get an idea of what is being paid homage to by this film.
 

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Far Frpm Heaven, a sure fire Oscar contender by the way, is a loose remake of Douglas Sirk's All That Heaven Allows. Director Todd Haynes kept the 1950's decor and storyline about a well-to-do housewife who finds symmetry and purpose through her blue collar gardener. The whole town is gossipping in a mean spirited way causing the couple much duress. In the original, which is available on a stellar looking DVD from Criterion, Rock Hudson plays the gardener with Jane Wyman (the first Mrs. Reagan) as the housewife.


In this one, Haynes adds a few modern day twists to attract more interest from today's audiences. He inserts a husband, played by Dennis Quaid in the performance of his career, who is bisexual and is discovered in the arms of another man by his wife. In those days, that type of behavior was deemed to be deviant but treatable by psychiatry. The gardener is an African American in this one and is played by Dennis Haysbert (Heat). Naturally racial prejudice was rampant in those days particularly in small New England towns.


The film belongs to Julianne Moore as the wife in a perfect performance that redefines internal repression and compassion. The cinematography is also a major player in this one as is the schmaltzy score by veteran Elmer Bernstein.


Sirk was perhaps one of the most underrated directors to come out of the 50's. This German born director loved the Technicolor process and used it to the hilt to embellish his films. He is also credited with classics such as Written on the Wind, Magnificent Obsession and Imitation of Life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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Really? The Esquire? Hard to believe, if only because it is six small, mediocre theaters. Vickie and I see a lot of movies in Chicago, and probably see a dozen films a year at the Esquire. But we don't see films there if it is playing at a better theater.
When I walked into the theater my thought was wow is this small or what. I was up there for business and just walked to the theater from the Fairmont Hotel after the lighting of Michigan Ave, the parade and fireworks. Quite an enjoyable long weekend starting with seeing the Blue Man Group Thursday evening. What a group and all that paper at the end.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Tim Wilkins
When I walked into the theater my thought was wow is this small or what. I was up there for business and just walked to the theater from the Fairmont Hotel after the lighting of Michigan Ave, the parade and fireworks. Quite an enjoyable long weekend starting with seeing the Blue Man Group Thursday evening. What a group and all that paper at the end.
The Esquire is the corpse of a huge theater. You no doubt noticed that the huge facade has no relationship to the teeny theaters inside. The two floors of theaters that remain were originally the very back rows of the two balconys. The rest of the theater was cut off and converted to retail space.
 

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This is sad news about the Esquire.


I haven't been there in years, although I went often in the 70's, when I lived in Chicago. It used to be one of the best cinemas in town, with a large screen and big auditorium - and projectionists who took great care in presenting films. As a matter of fact, the Esquire was a main venue for the Chicago Film Festival - it's where I saw Tarkovsky's Solaris - in 1973, I think. I also saw a special presentation of the special effects in Citizen Kane, presented by the man who helped design them. That was a literal eye opener. Just down the street, re-releases of Chaplin were playing.


Those were the days.
 

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Not to sidetrack the topic of this post, but I have fond memories of seeing movies at the Esquire as well... Return of the Jedi, Indiana Jones & The Temple of Doom and Near Dark. There was no better theater in Chicago in the 80s (except maybe McClurg Court before they divided it up). I remember another single large screen theater about a block away from the Esquire around the corner on Rush. Anyone remember the name of that one?
 
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