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Discussion Starter #1
Spent a few hours calibrating my tv last night using HCFR with the OLED profile. I was shooting for a flat 2.2 gamma but then ended up using this hybrid 2.2 low end and rising to 2.4 on the high end instead. Seems like this is the best look for OLED. Anything I can improve here? I think it looks good. I didn't touch the luminance values of the White Balance just RGB. I recall that would introduce color errors. Seems like making any changes to IRE5 and IRE 95/100 can screw up the entire graph so I just left it here. Some of the higher IRE values needed major blue removal from -20 to -35. Is this typical with OLEDs?

Any feedback is greatly appreciated. Ignore simulated sensor I had unplugged the meter. Some screenshots of the results below.

Meter: i1 Display Pro connected to Laptop mounted on a tripod
Pattern: Ted's Lightspace CMS Calibration Disk
Source: LG UBK90 UHD Player

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3027068
 

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Hi,

Can you post some more details about your calibration procedure?

Have you adjusted the 2-Point RGB balance initially, and then you moved to 20-Point?

Have you disabled TCP from Service Menu?

Ideally, it will require to ignore the 2-Point RGB balance from the regular TV menu and perform the 109% White calibration using the Service Menu RGB-High adjustments.

Keeping the Red-High to 192 and reducing the other two color channels, while using OLED Light reduces the slider for having 124 nits.

You can find the 109% pattern inside CalMAN's session of the disk, Dynamic Range chapter.

After the 109% calibration from Service Menu, continue from the regular menu using the 20-Point RGB balance.

That procedure will provide you better picture quality as SM's adjustments will directly affect the panel before the LG processing of regular TV menus.

Since HCFR doesn't support measurements above 100%, look RGB balance and Y readings only while calibrating the 109%.

Set your gamma to 2.4, as for 2.4 gamma the movies are mastered for SDR home delivery the last years, 100 nits also.

For gamma 2.4, when you have 100 nits @ 100% White, you will have 124 @ 109% Super White.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi,

Can you post some more details about your calibration procedure?

Have you adjusted the 2-Point RGB balance initially, and then you moved to 20-Point?

Have you disabled TCP from Service Menu?

Ideally, it will require to ignore the 2-Point RGB balance from the regular TV menu and perform the 109% White calibration using the Service Menu RGB-High adjustments.

Keeping the Red-High to 192 and reducing the other two color channels, while using OLED Light reduces the slider for having 124 nits.

You can find the 109% pattern inside CalMAN's session of the disk, Dynamic Range chapter.

After the 109% calibration from Service Menu, continue from the regular menu using the 20-Point RGB balance.

That procedure will provide you better picture quality as SM's adjustments will directly affect the panel before the LG processing of regular TV menus.

Since HCFR doesn't support measurements above 100%, look RGB balance and Y readings only while calibrating the 109%.

Set your gamma to 2.4, as for 2.4 gamma the movies are mastered for SDR home delivery the last years, 100 nits also.

For gamma 2.4, when you have 100 nits @ 100% White, you will have 124 @ 109% Super White.
Thank you for taking the time to reply. I went straight for the 20 point calibration because I could not find any evidence on whether 2-point settings are not ignored after switching to 20.

Basically, I started with ISF Expert Bright, 2.2 gamma and Warm 2 white balance, OLED light 60, Contrast 85 and Brightness 50. Then used the 21 point greyscale window patterns and went one IRE step paused at a time till I got to 100 while HCFR was actively reading and I was making adjustments. I then went back a few times after doing full 20 point sweeps making slight tweaks here and there and remeasuring. I followed the same process for the primary and secondary colors. Then did the full sweeps again.

Can you explain a bit further the theory behind tweaking 109% super white in the service menu? This is the first time I'm hearing about it. Also TCP is disabled in the service menu.
 

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Can you explain a bit further the theory behind tweaking 109% super white in the service menu? This is the first time I'm hearing about it. Also TCP is disabled in the service menu.
The info about why doing Service Menu White Balance provides a better picture from regular TV menu adjustments is available to that page.

The White Balance in Service Menu has three presets for White balance (Cool - Medium - Warm).

In contrast, the TV regular OSD menu has six color temp selections.

During the LG factory Quality Control process, they will calibrate the White Balance of the panel using an LG software.

It's an automatic calibration procedure since LG software communicates with the TV. It will apply the adjustments based on the readings it will take.

The software will display an 80 IRE full-field pattern and will perform the panel calibration.

These adjustments are directly affecting the panel to count for pane-per-panel variations, before the calibration controls of the regular TV menu.

LG has defined specific coordinates for each color temperature, to make it simple, 6500K for 'Warm', 9300K for 'Medium' and 11000K for 'Cool'.

White Balance settings of 'Warm' in Service Menu will affect the 'Warm 1, Warm 2, and Warm 3' preset of regular TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Medium' in Service Menu will affect the 'Medium and Warm 1' preset of Normal TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Cool' in Service Menu will affect the 'Cool' preset of Normal TV Menu.

For SM WB, I recommend the users to use:

SM Cool for pre-calibrating the 109% White for SDR (with SDR pattern) and select Cool in the regular TV menu.

SM Warm for pre-calibrating for 100% White (with HDR pattern) and select Warm 2 on the regular TV menu.

We don't want the adjustments of color temp preset to affect a different color temp calibration.



For White Balance calibration using Service Menu, there is a setting 'Test Pattern' with '100IRE', '80IRE' and 'OFF' as options.

The 'IRE' selections will display an internal generated full-field pattern.

These patterns will bypass a lot of signal processing steps.

We don't want this to happen; for that reason, select 'OFF' and use a 109% SDR White pattern with 11% window size generated from your HDMI input from my calibration disk you are using, for example.

When the RGB Gain has values of 192.192.192, it will provide the panel's maximum dynamic range. (RGB Cut 64.64.64 are the default values)

LG in the factory, but users also have to keep the Red Gain @ 192 (to keep max dynamic range) and then reduce only values from G Gain and B Gain to calibrate the RGB balance.



Note: don't press the RESET button to the White Balance menu in Service Menu.

After the WB calibration during factory pre-calibration, the system will send an OK value that the WB calibration has performed.

LG's QC technician will see that White Balance has performed when he looks at the initial service menu screen. See the left side of the following picture where it says ''Adjust White Balance: OK'':



When the user presses 'RESET' to the SM WB menu, it will delete the calibration values stored from the factory for his panel.

A warning with red letters (right side of the picture) will appear, which will say ''Adjust White Balance: NG'' (aka NOT GOOD).

Looking at the left side of the picture, its how the TV should look when someone hasn't pressed 'RESET', after performing manual cal of SM WB (or before any manual SM WB adjustment).

LG is still incorrectly naming the RGB Balance controls as 'IRE', a term which means the ''voltage of the signal in the analog world'', as used in CRT's before 20 years.

TVs, in digital world signaling, have to use '%' or 'code values' for grayscale steps, nor IRE.

When you perform 'basic' pre-calibration from the SM WB menu, it will require fewer adjustments from regular 'multi-point' TV menus later.

While the picture will look better, the required time for the calibration will be shorter.

The regular TV menu has many calibration controls and settings.

When you change all these controls, an LG processing unit with combine all your setting values to and it will calculate a global correction for the TV.

SM Panel calibration + global correction of regular TV Menus will manipulate the signal before it enters the RGB-> WRGB processing unit -> Panel.

LG's controls for manual cal can add artifacts or degrade pictures (even with Luminance controls in RGB Balance) because the algorithm is very complicated.

The additional processing can bring some out-of-valid-range adjustments and can affect the picture.

It's the reason we suggest to users to not use Luminance controls in 20-Point RGB-Balance controls and CMS to some sets.

The problems will appear with real movie evaluation, or when the users will perform an evaluation using static color ramps or gradation patterns of my calibration disk.

The two-color reproduction ramps are useful for quick evaluation.

So after a lot of testing, doing Service Menu White Balance is the best method to pre-calibrate the display before the profiling or before starting a manual calibration using the available calibration controls from the regular TV menu.

It will provide a cleaner picture with smoother gradations.

After the SM WB calibration, the users can continue with multi-point RGB balance calibration from the regular TV menu (skipping the 2-Point RGB balance of regular TV menu).

When you are not calibrating SM WB and using a 2-Point RGB balance of regular menu (or multi-point), this can make the internal processing algorithm more complex.

For example, the SM WB can remove Green while your regular TV menu to add Green.

Two settings which perform similar kind of adjustment have different values, and this fact will add complexity and unnecessary additional processing to the signal manipulator.

The side-effects can be noticed during the evaluation of gradation.

It's a better solution to use a 2-Point RGB balance from one White Balance menu and not apply the same adjustments from both menus (regular TV menu + SM) simultaneously.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
G has defined specific coordinates for each color temperature, to make it simple, 6500K for 'Warm', 9300K for 'Medium' and 11000K for 'Cool'.

White Balance settings of 'Warm' in Service Menu will affect the 'Warm 1, Warm 2, and Warm 3' preset of regular TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Medium' in Service Menu will affect the 'Medium and Warm 1' preset of Normal TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Cool' in Service Menu will affect the 'Cool' preset of Normal TV Menu.

For SM WB, I recommend the users to use:

SM Cool for pre-calibrating the 109% White for SDR (with SDR pattern) and select Cool in the regular TV menu.

SM Warm for pre-calibrating for 100% White (with HDR pattern) and select Warm 2 on the regular TV menu.
That makes sense I will redo as time permits thank you. Some follow up questions.

If I modify SM Cool for SDR for ISF Dark Preset at 100 nits 2.4 gamma, can I use the same WB preset for a ISF Bright setting? or do I have to have another WB preset at 185 nits for example (OLED LIGHT 60) 2.2 gamma?

I know HCFR is limited to HDR10 but using Warm 2 will impact Dolby Vision can these be shared as with the former?
 

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That makes sense I will redo as time permits thank you. Some follow up questions.

If I modify SM Cool for SDR for ISF Dark Preset at 100 nits 2.4 gamma, can I use the same WB preset for a ISF Bright setting? or do I have to have another WB preset at 185 nits for example (OLED LIGHT 60) 2.2 gamma?

I know HCFR is limited to HDR10 but using Warm 2 will impact Dolby Vision can these be shared as with the former?
Use SM Cool to pre-calibrate for D65 REC.709.

Then SM Warm to pre-calibrate for D65 REC.2020.

While both are D65 and have the same coordinates, they use different luminance mixtures per color channel.

Each colorspace, while using the same xy coordinates to create the D65 White Point, uses a different mixture of primary colors luminance to archive that, while both have 6504K color temperature.

When you use the RGB Balance Chart of calibration software and see the three (R/G/B) Channels Bars at 100% = 0 dE, it doesn't mean that they used the equal percentage of luminance per each color channel.

The calibration software will normalize the luminance ratio per primary color internally according to the selected colorspace, providing the user interface a more calibration friendly chart.



It's the reason you perform different pre-cal for SDR and HDR.

Then select Cool color temp to any SDR mode you want to calibrate and Warm to any HDR10/DV mode.

Changes to a specific SM color temp will affect all modes of the TV with the same color temp selected in the regular TV menu of any mode: SDR/HDR10/HLG/DoVi.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was able to rerun the process and got much better results. Thank you Ted for all the tips.

Summary:

1) Started out with the Service Menu calibrating the white balance using 109% patch in the Calman dynamic range section. Ended up with Backlight at 24 for 124 nits for Cool WB.
3) HCFR set target for 2.4 gamma and adjusted 2 point WB calibration. Followed up by 20 point. Multiple hours and full sweeps.
4) Didn't touch CMS yet to be continued ran out of time.

I noticed some odd things like single reading 95/100 IRE versus doing a full sweep the value had a huge fluctuation up towards 2.6 gamma. Not sure if this is a bug or by design. I just ended up changing the RGB values until the full sweep was in line and ignoring the single readings. Happy with the final EOTF gamma curve. The meter did struggle a bit at IRE 5 with 100 nits. I think that is to be expected.

Alas the results:

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Hi, the fluctuation you see is normal, as you stay to a specific patch and perform real-time adjustments.

Try to measure by taking a grayscale sweep.

After that, pause a black patch (for the panel to cool down).

Look your whole RGB balance and gamma charts in your software and think which changes to apply to all calibration controls to reduce the errors of the entire grayscale at once...

Open OSD of TV, apply the adjustments to all controls, close OSD, remeasure the whole grayscale...repeat process.

After the end of grayscale see a grayscale ramp to confirm that you have no issues:



Then perform a quick visual check to see if your CMS controls are working with no issues.

Without using any meter, open CMS controls, display the color ramp, and adjust some controls randomly:



If you see problems appear when you change the CMS controls, it will mean that you will see issues when you will use a meter also.

You can try with a meter to calibrate only color only (red, for example) and re-check that pattern for issues.

That test will save you a lot of time from performing a full CMS calibration, which will probably add issues to your content after calibration, due to internal CMS processing design.
 

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The info about why doing Service Menu White Balance provides a better picture from regular TV menu adjustments is available to that page.

The White Balance in Service Menu has three presets for White balance (Cool - Medium - Warm).

In contrast, the TV regular OSD menu has six color temp selections.

During the LG factory Quality Control process, they will calibrate the White Balance of the panel using an LG software.

It's an automatic calibration procedure since LG software communicates with the TV. It will apply the adjustments based on the readings it will take.

The software will display an 80 IRE full-field pattern and will perform the panel calibration.

These adjustments are directly affecting the panel to count for pane-per-panel variations, before the calibration controls of the regular TV menu.

LG has defined specific coordinates for each color temperature, to make it simple, 6500K for 'Warm', 9300K for 'Medium' and 11000K for 'Cool'.

White Balance settings of 'Warm' in Service Menu will affect the 'Warm 1, Warm 2, and Warm 3' preset of regular TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Medium' in Service Menu will affect the 'Medium and Warm 1' preset of Normal TV Menu.

White Balance settings of 'Cool' in Service Menu will affect the 'Cool' preset of Normal TV Menu.

For SM WB, I recommend the users to use:

SM Cool for pre-calibrating the 109% White for SDR (with SDR pattern) and select Cool in the regular TV menu.

SM Warm for pre-calibrating for 100% White (with HDR pattern) and select Warm 2 on the regular TV menu.

We don't want the adjustments of color temp preset to affect a different color temp calibration.



For White Balance calibration using Service Menu, there is a setting 'Test Pattern' with '100IRE', '80IRE' and 'OFF' as options.

The 'IRE' selections will display an internal generated full-field pattern.

These patterns will bypass a lot of signal processing steps.

We don't want this to happen; for that reason, select 'OFF' and use a 109% SDR White pattern with 11% window size generated from your HDMI input from my calibration disk you are using, for example.

When the RGB Gain has values of 192.192.192, it will provide the panel's maximum dynamic range. (RGB Cut 64.64.64 are the default values)

LG in the factory, but users also have to keep the Red Gain @ 192 (to keep max dynamic range) and then reduce only values from G Gain and B Gain to calibrate the RGB balance.



Note: don't press the RESET button to the White Balance menu in Service Menu.

After the WB calibration during factory pre-calibration, the system will send an OK value that the WB calibration has performed.

LG's QC technician will see that White Balance has performed when he looks at the initial service menu screen. See the left side of the following picture where it says ''Adjust White Balance: OK'':



When the user presses 'RESET' to the SM WB menu, it will delete the calibration values stored from the factory for his panel.

A warning with red letters (right side of the picture) will appear, which will say ''Adjust White Balance: NG'' (aka NOT GOOD).

Looking at the left side of the picture, its how the TV should look when someone hasn't pressed 'RESET', after performing manual cal of SM WB (or before any manual SM WB adjustment).

LG is still incorrectly naming the RGB Balance controls as 'IRE', a term which means the ''voltage of the signal in the analog world'', as used in CRT's before 20 years.

TVs, in digital world signaling, have to use '%' or 'code values' for grayscale steps, nor IRE.

When you perform 'basic' pre-calibration from the SM WB menu, it will require fewer adjustments from regular 'multi-point' TV menus later.

While the picture will look better, the required time for the calibration will be shorter.

The regular TV menu has many calibration controls and settings.

When you change all these controls, an LG processing unit with combine all your setting values to and it will calculate a global correction for the TV.

SM Panel calibration + global correction of regular TV Menus will manipulate the signal before it enters the RGB-> WRGB processing unit -> Panel.

LG's controls for manual cal can add artifacts or degrade pictures (even with Luminance controls in RGB Balance) because the algorithm is very complicated.

The additional processing can bring some out-of-valid-range adjustments and can affect the picture.

It's the reason we suggest to users to not use Luminance controls in 20-Point RGB-Balance controls and CMS to some sets.

The problems will appear with real movie evaluation, or when the users will perform an evaluation using static color ramps or gradation patterns of my calibration disk.

The two-color reproduction ramps are useful for quick evaluation.

So after a lot of testing, doing Service Menu White Balance is the best method to pre-calibrate the display before the profiling or before starting a manual calibration using the available calibration controls from the regular TV menu.

It will provide a cleaner picture with smoother gradations.

After the SM WB calibration, the users can continue with multi-point RGB balance calibration from the regular TV menu (skipping the 2-Point RGB balance of regular TV menu).

When you are not calibrating SM WB and using a 2-Point RGB balance of regular menu (or multi-point), this can make the internal processing algorithm more complex.

For example, the SM WB can remove Green while your regular TV menu to add Green.

Two settings which perform similar kind of adjustment have different values, and this fact will add complexity and unnecessary additional processing to the signal manipulator.

The side-effects can be noticed during the evaluation of gradation.

It's a better solution to use a 2-Point RGB balance from one White Balance menu and not apply the same adjustments from both menus (regular TV menu + SM) simultaneously.
Thanks Ted.
Got a few questions.
I want to calibrate with an i1displaypro plus profiled with a X-rite i1Basic Pro 3
1. So should have both meters be in full contact with the oled screen or is a 1 feet distance better?
2. when adjusting the 22 Point you said not to touch the luminance. Just RGB to raise or lower the gamma ramp? correct?
 

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Thanks Ted.
Got a few questions.
I want to calibrate with an i1displaypro plus profiled with a X-rite i1Basic Pro 3
1. So should have both meters be in full contact with the oled screen or is a 1 feet distance better?
2. when adjusting the 22 Point you said not to touch the luminance. Just RGB to raise or lower the gamma ramp? correct?
Hi Dirk,

1) Non-contact measurements.

The i1Display PRO just some cm away from the screen for not having mechanical contact.

i1PRO3 needs some further cm away from i1Display PRO, to see a similar number of pixels.

2) Correct.
 

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I want to calibrate with an i1displaypro plus profiled with a X-rite i1Basic Pro 3
1. So should have both meters be in full contact with the oled screen or is a 1 feet distance better?
Based on my own recent measurements of the i1Pro 3, placing the tip of its aperture 10cm from the screen will read roughly the same area of pixels as the C6 HDR2000 when it is in contact mode. If the i1Display Pro Plus has a 24mm aperture, then it should be the same as the C6 HDR2000 in contact mode.
 

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Hi Dirk,

1) Non-contact measurements.

The i1Display PRO just some cm away from the screen for not having mechanical contact.

i1PRO3 needs some further cm away from i1Display PRO, to see a similar number of pixels.

2) Correct.
Hi Ted, thanks for all your answers. If you were in Germany i would spend a Beer :)

Ok, yesterday i profiled my i1Display Pro Plus with the display pro 3! I've done it by full contact before you answerd. So maybe I'll have to do it again.
But what makes me anoying is that everybody is doing full contact??? But logical a distance would be better to measure more pixels because of screen uniformity.
But what was really interessting was the differences betwenn the methods. It looks like the i1display pro, without a profile, in xyz is more acurate than with the fsi edr.
All measurements werde done in full contact expect 1b.
Now i know why the reds arer out of space. The TV has a bug. Sometimes I#ll have to swi´tch the colorgamut from auto to any other option and back. Than rec709 is activated and the reds are all in.

1. i1 Display Pro with fsi.edr without profile full contact

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1.b i1 Display Pro with fsi.edr without profile 1 feet away

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2. i1 Display Pro with xyz without profile full contact

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3. i1 Display Pro Profiled "Bodner xyz" with display Pro 3 full contact... But why is red so offset?

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So what is better?
Tyler says in his Bodner Profiling Method tu use xyz.
Would you say to profile the i1Displaypro with fsi.edr would be better?
Murideo says it doesn't matter because the profile overrides the edr values.

One thing i can say about the measurement session is:
This is the first time the green/yellow Tint is gone in bright pictures. But afterall i don't know if it is correct???
So t´here is one more variable in the chain. The display pro 3.
Ninjacien said, to use the fsi.edr when making the bodner profile. Tyler says xyz.
Ninjacien said not to use D65 with oled instead 3127 we should use 309.

Sometimes i believe there are so many variables and settings that there is no way to find out what is 100% correct.

But afterall the picture looks now ok for me. But i would be more satisfied when some would say. This is correct. So at the moment i don't know which way to go to get the perfect picture.

Thanks
 

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Based on my own recent measurements of the i1Pro 3, placing the tip of its aperture 10cm from the screen will read roughly the same area of pixels as the C6 HDR2000 when it is in contact mode. If the i1Display Pro Plus has a 24mm aperture, then it should be the same as the C6 HDR2000 in contact mode.
So the i1displaypro in full contact and the display pro 3 10cm away from screen?
But what about the screenadapter for the display pro 3. Is it better to take it away when 10cm away because of the small hole in the adapter?
 

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So the i1displaypro in full contact and the display pro 3 10cm away from screen?
But what about the screenadapter for the display pro 3. Is it better to take it away when 10cm away because of the small hole in the adapter?
Spectro @ 10cm ~= colorimeter in contact mode, yes. On the i1Pro 3, leave the limiting aperture head in place.
 

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But what makes me anoying is that everybody is doing full contact??? But logical a distance would be better to measure more pixels because of screen uniformity.
Contact mode is simply easier, in that you don't have to worry about ambient light or angle of the meter affecting the measurements. On a 75" 4K display, contact mode (24mm diameter) already covers ~2445 pixels.
 

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So what is better?
Tyler says in his Bodner Profiling Method tu use xyz.
Would you say to profile the i1Displaypro with fsi.edr would be better?
Murideo says it doesn't matter because the profile overrides the edr values.

One thing i can say about the measurement session is:
This is the first time the green/yellow Tint is gone in bright pictures. But afterall i don't know if it is correct???
So t´here is one more variable in the chain. The display pro 3.
Ninjacien said, to use the fsi.edr when making the bodner profile. Tyler says xyz.
Ninjacien said not to use D65 with oled instead 3127 we should use 309.
If you are using different EDR's/Profiles, they are all bound to be different. So ignore all those measurements for the time being.

There is nothing wrong with the FSI EDR, I have tested and compared it personally against a Jeti 1501 (5nm Spectro) on 11 different i1 Display Pros, and it gives better results than the factory calibration (Generic CMF/Raw XYZ) on all of them. However, no EDR can ever account for meter variances, which is why profiling to a Spectro will always be more accurate. The EDR is only to be used when profiling to a Spectro is not an option.

The absolute best method to meter profile currently on a WOLED panel is either Bodner (if you are using CalMAN) or FCVM (if you are using ColourSpace). These newer methods of meter profiling have been fully and independently tested over months by many people with various meter combos and can only be described as game changers when it specifically comes to WRGB OLED panels and the i1 Display Pro meters in particular.

With both of these profiling methods, you should not use any meter preset (so no EDR with the i1 Display Pro). Always use RAW XYZ for Bodner in CalMAN, or Generic CMF for FCVM in ColourSpace.

If you are calibrating with a 3D LUT (AutoCAL) then you should profile your meters with the panel in its native gamut (Wide).

Use of an alternate white point is a personal preference (and can vary from person to person), but there is nothing wrong with shooting for D65 first and going from there. However, the 0.309/0.329 white point is not intended for i1 Pro users. That white point was initially provided by D-Nice by perceptually matching to a Plasma calibrated to D65 with a 5nm Spectro. I personally performed the same experiment by calibrating a Pioneer Kuro Plasma to D65 with the Jeti 1501, and perceptually matching an LG OLED to it and came to near as damn it the same white point (mine was 0.3089/0.3293).

But I also still had a 9 month old (purchased brand new) i1 Pro2 OEM at the time and that does not measure white the same as a high end Spectro. With the two meters measuring simultaneously, with the Jeti reading 0.309/0.329, the i1 Pro 2 (remember, just 9 months old, so still well within spec) read 0.3120/0.3556.

This does not mean that white point will work for all i1 Pro owners on all WOLED panels, as there is meter to meter variability with the i1 Pro meters (X-Rite state Inter-Instrument Agreement of 0.4 dE94 Avg - 1.0 dE94 Max).

Short version.......

Profile you i1d3 (Raw XYZ) to your i1 Pro using the Bonder Method and calibrate to D65.

If things look off to you, then consider using an alternate white point. If either of the mentioned coordinates do not work for you, you will have to attempt perceptually matching to another display technology yourself.
 

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Thanks.
I've done your last tip but i am not satisfied. The picture now looks to blue. Before profiling it looked to green. So i dont now what more to do.
 

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So i dont now what more to do.
As suggested above, you must first check the meter profile was successfully within tolerance. If you used Bonder (and did it correctly) it "should" be very accurately profiled. If it isn't then there is something wrong.

If the profile was successful and you whites look "off white" then it is due to metameric failure and you will require an alternate white point. As I said before, the one you mentioned is not really suitable for a 10nm Spectro such as the i1 Pro meters. If the two white points mentioned above do not look correct to you either, then you will need to find your own, and it is relatively simple to do once you understand the process.


If you don't have access to a Plasma or CRT display, you can use pretty much any standard gamut display that does not have narrow primaries and it will most likely give a better result "for your eyes". Even a standard notebook display can work (not all notebooks though, mine has an absolutely [email protected] display).
 

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If you did your meter profile with the i1Pro 3 at a distance from the screen, then it would also pay to do the equivalent of a meter profile verification of the i1Pro 3 against itself, comparing readings with the i1Pro 3 in contact mode with readings made at a distance, to make sure you didn't have problems with ambient light or meter alignment.
 
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