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What's your prime seating's field of view?

  • Native Scope/CIH Screen (2.3x:1) - FOV less than 36deg = prime row more than 3.68xH

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • Native Scope/CIH Screen (2.3x:1) - FOV 36-43deg = prime row between 3.68xH and 3.00xH

    Votes: 5 5.2%
  • Native Scope/CIH Screen (2.3x:1) - FOV 44-53deg = prime row between 2.99xH and 2.39xH

    Votes: 17 17.5%
  • Native Scope/CIH Screen (2.3x:1) - FOV 54-62deg = prime row between 2.38xH and 2.00xH

    Votes: 7 7.2%
  • Native Scope/CIH Screen (2.3x:1) - FOV greater than 62deg = prime row less than 2.00xH

    Votes: 2 2.1%
  • Native HDTV/CIW Screen (16:9) - FOV less than 36deg = prime row more than 1.54xW

    Votes: 9 9.3%
  • Native HDTV/CIW Screen (16:9) - FOV 36-43deg = prime row between 1.54xW and 1.26xW

    Votes: 19 19.6%
  • Native HDTV/CIW Screen (16:9) - FOV 44-53deg = prime row between 1.25xW and 1.00xW

    Votes: 30 30.9%
  • Native HDTV/CIW Screen (16:9) - FOV 54-62deg = prime row between 0.99xW and 0.84xW

    Votes: 3 3.1%
  • Native HDTV/CIW Screen (16:9) - FOV greater than 62deg = prime row less than 0.84xW

    Votes: 4 4.1%
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In my last iteration, I had 143 inch 16:9, approx. 9 foot seating distance.


I also have a cheap manually adjustable PJ.



I just zoomed in and out between 143 and approx. 100 inches as needed, there is no watching a 143 inch image with heavy blair witch type pans without a few people feeling sick or youtube vids with a head mounted cam...….:D



The 143 was max size for my throw distance...…..in my next planned iteration I want to push it as big as a PJ will support.....I know about 150 inch was pushing my 1080 ht2050 to the limits and 9 feet from a 1080 image that size did not give the best picture quality...….I can step in my adjoining room and get a 16 to 17 foot viewing distance and the picture looked much better from that distance.


I will be curious how far I can push a 4k PJ in relation to screen size viewing distance etc...… I will go as large as possible, probably a throw distance limited / wall size thing and just do cheap manual masking around the screen...…...I have played with it in my current room and a couple minutes to set up a movie between zooming and screen masking was no big deal for me.



I think what will make the ideal set up for me is doing a screen as large as possible, then just manually masking, then I have all options and sizes possible...…………….



Right now I have mine shrunk down on the 121 inch screen to right under 100 inches soo it gets brighter and I can have the lights on.....later if I do a movie, I might blow it up to the 121 again...…...which is the max size I can go due to throw distance.....I think I measured the smallest at about 80 inches, which is nice for when all the lights are on and non critical viewing.
 

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Right now I have mine shrunk down on the 121 inch screen to right under 100 inches soo it gets brighter and I can have the lights on.....later if I do a movie, I might blow it up to the 121 again...…...which is the max size I can go due to throw distance.....I think I measured the smallest at about 80 inches, which is nice for when all the lights are on and non critical viewing.
I stared doing my zoom with moving the projector rather than zoom and the big benefit is leaving the projector at widest zoom for max light output and then when zooming by moving the projector I get a double hit in brightness. The other plus with a manual projector is no messing with zoom and focus control. I can go from 65” to 110” in 10 seconds. What I found for me is manual masking wore me out.

I love the brightness boost for TV with some lights on. Maybe 50-60 FL hitting the screen :)
 

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So...I come in at 44.3 deg. according to the site http://myhometheater.homestead.com/viewingdistancecalculator.html which only works for 16:9 and 4:3 screens. Since I do a simple 151.5" 16:9 image at 13.5 feet, the site works. Unlike many of you we never really cared about guidelines and simply picked the seating distance that worked for the family. By moving the seats back and forth we finally drilled into the distance that works for everyone in the family just like we always did with TVs and commercial theaters. Much closer and eye strain/stomach queasiness becomes a factor...too far back and it is "meh". While I/we have been known to pull a almost "Russell Burrows" extreme for IMAX, 3D and "ride/motion videos", we can only take it for a very short time...say around two hours max and since a day's viewing may run 6 to 16 plus hours, that extreme doesn't work for daily viewing.
 

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So...I come in at 44.3 deg. according to the site http://myhometheater.homestead.com/viewingdistancecalculator.html which only works for 16:9 and 4:3 screens. Since I do a simple 151.5" 16:9 image at 13.5 feet, the site works. Unlike many of you we never really cared about guidelines and simply picked the seating distance that worked for the family. By moving the seats back and forth we finally drilled into the distance that works for everyone in the family just like we always did with TVs and commercial theaters. Much closer and eye strain/stomach queasiness becomes a factor...too far back and it is "meh". While I/we have been known to pull a almost "Russell Burrows" extreme for IMAX, 3D and "ride/motion videos", we can only take it for a very short time...say around two hours max and since a day's viewing may run 6 to 16 plus hours, that extreme doesn't work for daily viewing.
Steve the AR on that site also threw me at first but because this whole angle thing is about screen width the program is fine for scope also as long as the width is correct.

The standards that talk about angle are assuming the theater is a CIH theater that shows both I think. That is my opposition to angle as I have mentioned to the OP @DigitalAV a couple of times. The increased immersion side to side isn’t what causes the fatigue and queasy stomach. It is the increase in height immersion that is the culprit IMO. Our normal vision in day-to-day life is 180deg. This is what made scope possible in the first place. Making the old image wider but not taller was fantastic so much more content without any of the drawbacks. IMAX is very careful about how they add height in. Even though IMAX1.89 and flat1.85 are very similar watching a flat movie IMAX height will be stressful.

When you push your couch up for a Russell Burrows hour of roller coaster fun knowing 16 hours of it would mess you up, you are doing what I do when I pull back on the stick and zoom up for the experience. Just two ways to do the same thing increase immersion. If I’m watching a IMAX movie and the next thing we watch is an episode of The Connors I’m pushing the stick back down. :eek:
 

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I get it now Bud...width is the factor not angles.

Steve the AR on that site also threw me at first but because this whole angle thing is about screen width the program is fine for scope also as long as the width is correct.

The standards that talk about angle are assuming the theater is a CIH theater that shows both I think. That is my opposition to angle as I have mentioned to the OP @DigitalAV a couple of times. The increased immersion side to side isn’t what causes the fatigue and queasy stomach. It is the increase in height immersion that is the culprit IMO. Our normal vision in day-to-day life is 180deg. This is what made scope possible in the first place. Making the old image wider but not taller was fantastic so much more content without any of the drawbacks. IMAX is very careful about how they add height in. Even though IMAX1.89 and flat1.85 are very similar watching a flat movie IMAX height will be stressful.

When you push your couch up for a Russell Burrows hour of roller coaster fun knowing 16 hours of it would mess you up, you are doing what I do when I pull back on the stick and zoom up for the experience. Just two ways to do the same thing increase immersion. If I’m watching a IMAX movie and the next thing we watch is an episode of The Connors I’m pushing the stick back down. :eek:
Are you sure??? The 44.3 deg. number comes back when I use the width 132" and 143.5" of scope has to be different than 151.5" of 16:9 at 13.5 feet...right??? :confused:
 

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Preferred Field of View

I like an immersive experience watching movies. So, I sit close at the cinema and have designed my home theater with a 160" diagonal/140" wide 16:9 screen with the first row of seating about 8 ft. away from the screen. That gives me a field of view of about 72 degrees in the first row. But, there are 3 rows for those who like to sit further away. Approx. 14 ft away for 2nd row, and 20 ft away for 3rd row.

Brian
 

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Native Scope/CIH Screen (2.3x:1) - FOV 44-53deg = prime row between 2.99xH and 2.39xH

My screen is 2.35 130" and we sit against the wall 10-12 ft away.

I would actually prefer a bit bigger, or to sit a little closer (I like the FOX FOV at the theater), but that's the limits of my projector's throw, and the limits of where my wife wants the couch :)
 

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For IMAX, it's the very last row.

For the 80' wide screen (standard theatre) about 2/3rds of the way back.

For any screen size at a theatre; I feel it's best to sit as close as you can and still be able to see from edge to edge without having to move my head. Anything closer is when I feel like I'm not taking in the whole experience.
 
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I am confused by the graphic. My screen is a 55 inch 16:9 and I sit 4.5 feet away.
 
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I stared doing my zoom with moving the projector rather than zoom and the big benefit is leaving the projector at widest zoom for max light output and then when zooming by moving the projector I get a double hit in brightness. The other plus with a manual projector is no messing with zoom and focus control. I can go from 65” to 110” in 10 seconds. What I found for me is manual masking wore me out.

I love the brightness boost for TV with some lights on. Maybe 50-60 FL hitting the screen :)
No need to refocus....simply just sliiiiide ?
 

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Thanks...….I see no reason to not use this in my next iteration then, I am ok with manually setting the zoom and focus, but since I am doing it several times a week and making it slide is pretty easy, why not !



It fits with my logic of why limit yourself...….;)



My installation gives me all available options in screen sizing this PJ supports and I can not see ever limiting this no matter what PJ I get in the future.


I am sure a few remember my posts in threads about aspect ratios and screens......:D


After reading thru many many large entire threads that are hundreds if not thousands of pages long, it became clear...….the best choice is the one that allows all the choices.


I installed my PJ, since I am room limited as far back, opened up to the largest size possible and that became my screen size, it gives me all possible options of all possible sizes for all possible aspect ratios.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
I am confused by the graphic. My screen is a 55 inch 16:9 and I sit 4.5 feet away.
Your FOV is 48deg! Good immersion without strain! I like it!
 

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For IMAX, it's the very last row.

For the 80' wide screen (standard theatre) about 2/3rds of the way back.

For any screen size at a theatre; I feel it's best to sit as close as you can and still be able to see from edge to edge without having to move my head. Anything closer is when I feel like I'm not taking in the whole experience.
Just curious, when you say you like to see the whole screen without moving your head are you moving your eyes?

Reason I ask is I also agree I don’t care for a lot of head moving during a movie even though I enjoy live sports and can easily sit and watch basketball for several hours from court side and be turning my head and body the whole time.

I do think because how our eyes have a very narrow FOV when it comes to really acute focus we move our eyes non stop when watching a movie. So the question then becomes how much eye movement is comfortable for several hours like watching a movie. That point I think changes from person to person quite a bit and the reason we see such a range in immersion people like.

One of the hardest things to get used to in immersive viewing like IMAX is that you don’t have to see the whole screen clearly. The stuff above and below and too the sides is there as peripheral vision filler. All the action and all the director intends for you to acutely view is within the safe central area. If when they move the area of interest away from the center of the screen the movement is a slower pan shot. It is trying to simulate our real vision we use all day every day where we have a huge level of immersion, but we are used to it and don’t find the need to take it all in.

As soon as we get in a theater we feel the need to process it all for some reason.
:)
 

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Just curious, when you say you like to see the whole screen without moving your head are you moving your eyes?

Reason I ask is I also agree I don’t care for a lot of head moving during a movie even though I enjoy live sports and can easily sit and watch basketball for several hours from court side and be turning my head and body the whole time.

I do think because how our eyes have a very narrow FOV when it comes to really acute focus we move our eyes non stop when watching a movie. So the question then becomes how much eye movement is comfortable for several hours like watching a movie. That point I think changes from person to person quite a bit and the reason we see such a range in immersion people like.

One of the hardest things to get used to in immersive viewing like IMAX is that you don’t have to see the whole screen clearly. The stuff above and below and too the sides is there as peripheral vision filler. All the action and all the director intends for you to acutely view is within the safe central area. If when they move the area of interest away from the center of the screen the movement is a slower pan shot. It is trying to simulate our real vision we use all day every day where we have a huge level of immersion, but we are used to it and don’t find the need to take it all in.

As soon as we get in a theater we feel the need to process it all for some reason.
:)
Really excellent points Bud. I agree that vision in the everyday real world is highly immersive due to peripheral vision, and we choose at any moment what to specifically focus on within that wide field. For me what makes watching films more difficult than the real world, and what limits how close I can sit, is the motion on screen not being as smooth as reality. So my 50 degree view for 2.39:1 content is about as immersive as I can get for my eyes - I tried hard to push it wider but just can't do it, but clearly others have no problem pushing into the 60 degree or greater viewing angles.

It's such a personal thing to decide on, which is why there is no substitute for spending as many days/weeks/months as needed projecting on a wall in your home and finding the perfect size/distance for your own eyes before buying a screen. I finally did that this summer and wish I had instead done it 11 years ago when I first got into projection (5 screens later! :)).

Ross
 
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Really excellent points Bud. I agree that vision in the everyday real world is highly immersive due to peripheral vision, and we choose at any moment what to specifically focus on within that wide field. For me what makes watching films more difficult than the real world, and what limits how close I can sit, is the motion on screen not being as smooth as reality. So my 50 degree view for 2.39:1 content is about as immersive as I can get for my eyes - I tried hard to push it wider but just can't do it, but clearly others have no problem pushing into the 60 degree or greater viewing angles.

It's such a personal thing to decide on, which is why there is no substitute for spending as many days/weeks/months as needed projecting on a wall in your home and finding the perfect size/distance for your own eyes before buying a screen. I finally did that this summer and wish I had instead done it 11 years ago when I first got into projection (5 screens later! :)).

Ross
Ross, I agree. Most directors doing IMAX 1.89 understand this and compose much different than they would a flat movie 1.85 of roughly the same AR. and some don’t. for those reasons showing a TV show or a flat movie at IMAX immersion can be quite jarring. It is more than just the physical size of someone’s head on the screen it is also rate of movement.

Some say Nolan would have filmed all of Dunkirk in IMAX if he had a way to get the cameras where he needed them. I tend to disagree after watching the movie quite a few times he fit them in WWII airplanes he could have fit them anyplace. If you watch the transactions when in IMAX there were some like the air shots that were very slow panning with loads of peripheral eye candy that wasn’t jarring, and the ground parts where there was loads of action the camera wasn’t flailing around it was like you were standing there to frozen to move but seeing something awful coming at you. Another movie Mission Imposable Ghost Protocol where he is climbing the building with suction cups and you are looking down. Some say the IMAX expanded area adds nothing and that is true except it adds peripheral area that makes the difference in me watching the movie or grabbing the armrests when watching the movie trying to not fall out of my seat. Those things are purely caused by immersion.

The whole reason I adopted a presentation that is variable was for these type of movies. It is hard to figure out before watching a movie how immersive I would like to see it. But watching the trailer and going by experience with different directors work I normally make a good guess. I used to do the same thing in a commercial theater thinking I wish I would have sat closer or back more. Once in a while mostly like you were saying if something is too much I will adjust the immersion during an intermission in the movie.

After the zoom feature on the projector my second favorite button in home theater is the pause button.
:D
 
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