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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried resurrecting an existing thread but nobody responded so I am quoting from my previous/original post from last week here:

Resurrecting this thread...

I saw Godzilla v Kong last night in a Regal RPX theater. By my calculations FOV at my seat was 70ish degrees but seemed fine to me.

in process of designing my second theater which will have 2 rows of seats about 11-11.5 feet from the screen (chosen to avoid room nulls) with second row 6 feet behind first row.

Currently planning a 140” DIY 16:9 spandex screen which yields FOVs of:

1st row 47.7 to 49.6 (11.5 vs 11 feet)
2nd row 32.4 to 33.3

Most of our viewing is streaming movies, series, etc. some sports and some blu-rays (maybe more blu rays in my future with the new theater and 4k projector)

Almost wondering if I should simply make sure i make the front row at 11 feet back from screen and keep it right at 50 degrees or if i should maybe go up in size. My last theater front row was about 44 degrees and though nice i do t think bigger would have been any problem
 

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Did you go thru all that other thread? There is a lot of great information in that thread.

I saw your post the other day, but didn’t reply as I think you have already answered your own question.

You need to find an immersion level that works for you or a compromise immersion good for you and your guests and one that is large enough for the material that plays well large and not to large for content that doesn’t. If you are like me and want it all then you should do some method of variable presentation.
 

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It's personal preference. Some people don't mind actually having to turn their head while others would find that ridiculous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
And the other thing i noticed watching with the huge 70ish degree field of view was that i mainly stayed focused centrally and screen edge stuff was just peripheral vision. Duh? Maybe i missed a few things on the screen edges but My guess is that the directors make most if the action fairly central so you don’t miss much if you are super close to the screen. I mean, heck, our visual system is always filtering out stuff in our peripheral vision as far as clarity goes. If we pick up some motion in the periphery then we turn out head to focus. However, if main action is straight ahead, no need to be turning.

While I wait for my projector to be delivered (new LG on back order) I’m going to borrow a friends portable projector and play around with it. No guessing needed then.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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You make the point I have been trying to tell people for many years. We go along every day of our life with nearly 180 degree visual immersion. We constantly scan with our eyes, turn our head and even turn our bodies to face what we are looking at and we find it very normal and comfortable. People go to a sporting event and crave the seats at court side and sit for hours watching the event move past their range of vision.

Then somehow in a movie it is different. Directors do plan for this as seen in all scope movies that force our side vision wider, but most people that really embrace scope movies have trouble accepting IMAX that does it in both directions.

That’s why I have adopted variable presentation as I feel how immersive we watch is a function of the cinematography and the intent of the director. It is not that hard to figure out what level of immersion is correct based around the content.
We used to also limit immersion based on the poorer quality of the media (resolution etc.) I have found some of the re-mastered old stuff can be enjoyed at even greater immersion.
 
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