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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm eagerly waiting for the shake-down of the next generation of 16x9 digital (LCD) projectors like the 11 HT and the Sanyo. Right now I have a 16x9 direct view (proscan) and we've really been enjoying doing the "light the fire and watch a movie" thing when the weather gets cold.


As I'm thinking about my eventual projector...I'm wondering if it will be possible to enjoy a fire while we watch a movie? The set-up in the room would most likely end up with the fireplace on the wall to the left of the seating position while facing the screen...


room:

 

______________

|     screen   &nbsp ;  |

|         &nbsp ;         &nbsp ;|

|         &nbsp ;         &nbsp ;|

|         &nbsp ;         &nbsp ;|

|fire         & nbsp;      |

|place       door|

|         &nbsp ;         &nbsp ;|

|         &nbsp ;         &nbsp ;|

|         &nbsp ;         &nbsp ;|

|_____________|

      couch

(projector overhead)


Any of you already dealt with this? Since the fire is on the left side-wall, I'm thinking maybe I could pull out a bi-fold screen to help block the light from reflecting onto the movie screen if it's a problem?


The whole projector thing would be harder to sell to the S.O. if it meant we could't enjoy a fire while watching movies!


Also, The projector will end up being mounted high in a cabinet on the back wall above the couch about 14' feet away from the screen. Is this too far for the Sony 11 HT without an additional lens option ($$) ?


thanks!!!


dave





[This message has been edited by DaViD Boulet (edited 05-31-2001).]
 

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My only suggestion is to make sure you purchase a projector with a high degree of brightness. None of these projectors approach the foot-lamberts of a direct-view television; there are some threads that will help you to calculate the relative screen brightness of these projectors (and don't rely overmuch on the spec'd ANSI lumens either; the optics have a tremendous impact on apparent brightness that aren't reflected in the specs).


From my experience, the brightest projectors for the lumens are the DILA models, not the DLPs, but I'm no expert at this.


Once you introduce ambient light into a FP system, you lose apparent contrast and "punch" in your images. They'll still be watchable, of course.


However, romance is a pretty good tradeoff for contrast, so obviously don't let this dictate too much! http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif


Still, the more foot-lamberts you get on the screen, the better off you are.


If you think this will be a habit, you might also consider a higher gain screen. Many DLP and DILA users really like the Stewart Greyhawk screen because it really helps with black levels and apparent contrast, but it has a gain of less than unity (i.e., 1.0). I use a Stewart 1.3 gain screen; others have gone as high as a 2.5 gain screen. The higher you go in gain, the smaller the "sweet spot" for viewing is, so off-axis viewers suffer somewhat, both in the horizontal AND vertical dimensions. There's lots of info on this in the Screens forum.


In short: if you're a maniac about this, you might want to measure the ambient light with the fire going, then do some calculations and see what gives, or ask a dealer to do it.


If you're not a maniac, then I'd get the brightest projector you're otherwise comfortable with and get a screen with a 1.3 gain minimum.


Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your feedback.


I'm now falling in love with the reviews of the new Sanyo. Is my understanding correct that as long as the fireplace doesn't cast its light onto the screen then the issue isn't as great? Since the fireplace is to the side of the screen...part of my thought is that if it created a noticable washed-out look to the screen maybe I could just pull out a bi-fold blind type thing to block the worst of the light reflecting onto the screen. We could still get the full effect of the fire but the screen wouldn't.


Anyway...I'll certainly post around it the screen forum.


Thanks guys!


dave
 

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David-


My basement HT is similar in layout to yours. I recently upgraded my fireplace with a Heat-n-Glow RF remote-controlled vented gas fireplace, with thermostat controlled automatic blower fan. Warms the theater quickly with good heat distribution.


I use a 4-segment fireplace screen with kitchen aluminum foil on two of the faces to eliminate fire light spillage onto the screen:


______________

| screen |



F\\

I/

R\\

E/


The back slashes have the aluminum foil, duct-taped on discreetly to hold it onto the faces of the quad-fold screen (tri-fold? four faces, three joints).


It works perfectly for me.


Reflection from the movie screen light off the aluminum foil back onto the screen? Nope. Crinkle up the foil to prevent a smooth surface, and put the "flat finish" side out, towards the screen.


Why foil? It's metal = heat resistant.


If your seats are located at the fireplace or behind, your movie watchers will see the fire through the segments represented by the forward slashes. The fire is blocked from the screen's view by the segments indicated by the back slashes.


For "perfection", use BBQ black spray paint on the foil side facing the screen. Don't paint the foil side facing the fire- it will get too hot. Besides, the reflected light from the backslash shiny side will increase the fire light for your audience.


Use black felt all over your screen wall, the ceiling in front of the screen for a distance of about 1/2 - 3/4 screen width from the screen towards the audience, and on the sidewalls for about half a screen width from the screen towards the audience. This should greatly reduce ambient light hurting your screen image.





[This message has been edited by Rgb (edited 06-04-2001).]
 

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Seems like lots of us have similar layouts...
www.klutzoplex.f2s.com for piccies of my layout.


But in WInter I crank on the fireplace, and have the FP going, and I haven't witnessed too many problems at all. Really dark scenes (i.e. Batman, Dark City) from dark movies tend to get a bit of adverse effect from the flickering light, but you don't notice after a while.


------------------
Klutzo,

the newbie HT Boy.

BA mains, Energy surrounds and sub.

Proxima DX3 main FP

Sharpvision Backup FP

Sony Wega aux monitor

Dalite 2.8 Gain screen

Sega Dreamcast (various controllers)

www.klutzoplex.f2s.com
 
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