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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've lurked this forum for quite a while taking in what I could but I'm to the point that I'd like to do a bit more. I have a Toshiba 55SV670u (LED back-lit with local dimming) and I know that I could have so much more to the picture than just the white / black point and hue / tint.


Starting out I'd really like something lower cost that would do a decent job (much better than eye-balling) where I can learn what is involved and improve the picture over what I am viewing now.


Most of the hardware I've seen is in the $500+ range but if possible I'd like to get started for much less than that... Can anyone suggest a setup that won't break the bank for someone who is not interested in getting in to the calibration business but would rather just like an improvement over no calibration at all?


Who knows, maybe down the road I'll end up selling teh basic one and making a step up but right now I'd just like to get my feet in the water and start learning....


Thanks!
 

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I would think having a pro do it that would explain everything he is doing would be a better investment. Your TV would be calibrated with (assuming a pro) hardware costing 10s of thousands of dollars, by someone who is good at it. You end up with an eduction and a perfect picture that you won't keep thinking.. is it correct or is this meter off..

Yes fun to play around but even more fun to enjoy your display!


I personally just got quotes from Spectracal last Wednesday, and for accurate, best bang for your buck hardware, you are looking at $1199. Calibration is probably $400-$500 by an experienced pro. I guess it is just a matter of, "I want a hobby" or "I want a perfect picture"


Good luck with whichever way you go! (btw I had the pro do my front projector but he didn't do as much education as I would have liked so make sure you ask about that if you choose the pro).
 

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Lost Dog,


I am a hobbyist as far as calibration goes and happen to own the same set as you have, the Toshiba Regza 55SV670U. I purchased the Chroma 5 and Calman Home software package roughly a year ago. I choose the Chroma 5, because at that time it was advertised as the only way to get a correct calibration on a LED backlit set. Well my experience has not been a smooth one. Apparently the Toshiba implementation of LED back lighting does not work well with the Chroma 5 when you select the enhanced LED tables. When everything is dialed in you end up with a picture that has a distinctive greenish cast. It works better if you just select the standard LCD tables. My experience is echoed amongst many different forums. Hindsight being 20/20 I should have gone for the Eye One Pro at that time.


I would really look at the new ColorMunki Spectroradiometer. It has a reasonable cost with Calman Home/DIY software. There have been many favorable comments on different forums on it's accuracy. There has also been a lot of discussion about that meter being supported in the future on the free HCFR calibration software.
 

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Greetings


Even a test disc and setting the user controls correctly will get you further along than just using an instrument and software.


It's not the instrument that is key. Doing the grayscale with my cs 200 at $13000 without setting the user controls correctly is a giant waste of time.


You can get 50 to 70% of the way there just by doing the user controls correctly with a $25 disc.


regards
 

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"I know that I could have so much more to the picture than just the white / black point and hue / tint."


Greetings


this is not saying he did it with a test disc or anything like that.


If one uses a meter that is known to have trouble on a certain tech ... is the end result really an improvement or a step backwards?


The rub here is that of all the clients that tell me they used test discs before calling me in ... it turned out that half of them did it wrong even with the disc. So when someone says they used a test disc, I ask myself which category they fall into. The guys that did it right or the guys that did it wrong? In all cases, everyone says they did it right ... and clearly that was not the case.



It should also be noted that a $2000 class is not really aimed at enthusiasts wanting to use $150 probes and freeware. Like it or not, those enthusiasts are not part of the universe where these classes inhabit.


Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the input!


I've used both Avia and the AVS disk. Fortunately the Toshiba has an expert mode where you can turn on/off Red, Blue, Green which makes setting hue / tint very easy. At this point I have it dead on where the blue is uniform in the flashing colorbar but with the Flashing Color Decoder pattern my red is ~-6 and green is ~+15. I notice that when watching TV things like grass looks a bit too florescent. My white / black point is set well also but I'd like to get above that 50% - 70% picture quality setting.


I have thought about having it professionally done but I'm also a very hands on DIY Engineer personality.


If there are suggestions to get my Red / Green more in line using Avia and AVS I'd love to hear it. At that point I may be close enough that I'd go for a professional job and then hop in to a ColorMunki (or whatever is good to go at the time).


Thanks again,


Neil
 

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Greetings


You bring the right kind of pro in when you want them to educate you on the calibration process and calibrate the tv as well.


Then you can go buy your munki and apply what you learned from the pro.


or you go buy the munki and start reading and figuring it out by yourself. Good way to go if time is not a premium for you. The pro education is a short cut through all the reading and wondering if you understood it right or not.


Regards
 
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