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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Colormunki and Calman software. I have only ever calibrated my own front projectors. A friend asked me to take a look at his Panasonic Plasma (TCP50ST50). How much different is this than front projectors? I have a tripod for the Colormunki or do I use the zippered case and in contact mode?

Is it the same steps:

contrast/brightness

Greyscale

Primary and Secondary.

Sorry for all the questions. I didn't see a how-to thread for flat panels. I am not even sure how far I need to go. It looks like that it has a 2 point greyscale, but I didn't find too many reviews and the dedicated thread had more complaints than tips that it was tiring.
 

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You put it flush against the display, contact mode. I'm guessing you are using the colormunki photo, the black one with the case that hangs on the screen. Not sure if this one needs some warm-up time on the plasma, since the plasma produces some heat. But to be safe I guess I would leave it on there about 10-20 minutes before you start taking readings.
 

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The fundamentals are the same...adjust brightness so that 16 is black...adjust contrast so that you at least see 235 (the more the better).


That TV will have grayscale adjustments in the service menu, or you could always calibrate the Custom mode
 

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Greetings


The munki spectro does not work with Chromapure ...


It does work with Calman ... (depends on the package you buy from spectracal)


regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the tips. We plugged in the numbers from Plasma TV Guide just to see how they worked. They were so close that it was scary. Basically, all I had to do was set the contrast and brightness and drop the panel from mid to low and it was nearly perfect. Since it only had a 2-pt greyscale that is all I checked. I didn't bother with just looking at 10-pt. All-in-all it was easier than doing a projector because I had a good start point.
 

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You MUST look at the entire 10 point grayscale. Calibrating 2 points and walking away is a huge risk (of not being a good calibration at all). The problem is, unless you measure the entire grayscale, you have no clue how linear the TV is in response to the controls you used to calibrate the 2 steps. Also, you don't know how linear or non-linear the display is before you started, nor after you were done. In fact, few calibrators today even bother with calibrating to 20% and 80% or 30% and 80% because the calibration controls interact with each other and because TVs are rarely linear over the entire grayscale. You MUST measure all 10 points each time you adjust any of the grayscale controls. Your goal is to get the errors across the entire grayscale from 10% to 100% as low as possible on average... getting 20 and 80 or 30 and 80 accurate can leave you with very large errors elsewhere in the grayscale. In fact, you have to make 20 and 80 or 30 and 80 less accurate in order to have lower overall errors across the entire grayscale. That's all part of the art of calibration.
 

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On my previous Samsung D7000, and this VT50, I go in and measure 80 and 30, get them close, and then make a 10-100 run. After that, I adjust 10pt as needed, then move to 10pt gamma.


On a set I had with 2pt only, Id adjust 30 and 80, then run 10-100 and see what it looked like. If 30 is spot on, but 10 and 20 have low blue and red high, then you need to add a little more blue back at 30. It will of course make 30 a little less accurate, but you dont want 10-20 red either
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