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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to flatten the frequency response of my home theater system. I'm using a Pioneer 49TXi w/ has a 9-Band equalizer per channel.


If I record the 9 test tones on a CD and play each tone I should be able to determine where some of the peaks and valleys are. If there is a peak at 64HZ for example, I could use the receiver to cut the peak by a few db.


Will this work to flatten the response? I realize I won't get a perfect result. Also, will the fact that the EQ is not parametric prevent me from achieving my goal?


Thoughts?


-Brian
 

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Hmm??? The MCACC in your 49TXi is designed to automatically carry out exactly what you have described -- flatten the speaker/room response as much as possible. I do not understand your question. What do you wish to accomplish on top of what the MCACC does?
 

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Hi Sushi,


The MCACC is NOT designed to flaten freq. response. MCACC is designed to mimic the acoustics of Air Studios.


-Brian
 

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"Will this work to flatten the response?"


The answer to your question is a definite maybe. Measuring the response across the audio band at only 9 points only tells you the response at those 9 points. It tells you nothing about what happens in between those points. If the response is relatively monotonic between those points, the equalizer will probably do some good. But, if the response does some really funky things, all bets are off. Even though the equalizer can only operate at 9 points, you should measure the response to a much finer spacing. If the response is fairly smooth, the equalizer should help. If the response is very "peaky" then it may or may not.


Tim
 

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Quote:
The MCACC is NOT designed to flaten freq. response. MCACC is designed to mimic the acoustics of Air Studios.
Incorrect. Nowhere does Pioneer claim that. All they say is, the MCACC was designed and engineered "in collaboration with" Air Studios. I do not think the engineers opted for mimicking the studio acoustics verbatim. However, I admit that I do not have a positive documentation stating that the MCACC aims for a flat response, either, although it is likely.


At any rate, coming back to your original question, what you say will basically achieve your goal. However, one important thing to keep in mind is, if you are going to use an SPL meter (e.g., RadioShack) to do it, you have to use a series of one-octave band-path pink noise or wobble tones, each centered around one of the 9 bands of 49TXi's EQ. Do not use simple sine waves, since what you want to measure is an "average" room/speaker response over each one-octave band, rather than that at one frequency (as Tim eluded). An alternative approach would be to use a wide-band pink noise as test tone (like MCACC does), combined with a real-time spectrum analyzer, which your laptop PC with a good measurement mic and pre-amp can substitute.
 
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