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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm installing a network in my house. I bought a patch panel from Monoprice, but I think I'm leaning towards getting a double-gang twelve-slot keystone panel to do the same job, instead, because it can mount flush to the surface of the wall. I'd like to use a real patch panel because it's easier to punch in cables, but it seems like it would be inconvenient for me to try to mount it in my wall.


Any solutions or alternatives out there?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by panfist /forum/post/16992703


I'm installing a network in my house. I bought a patch panel from Monoprice, but I think I'm leaning towards getting a double-gang twelve-slot keystone panel to do the same job, instead, because it can mount flush to the surface of the wall. I'd like to use a real patch panel because it's easier to punch in cables, but it seems like it would be inconvenient for me to try to mount it in my wall.


Any solutions or alternatives out there?

How about a simple 2-6u wall mount punch panel rack?
 

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Put it in your basement, a closet, your attic, or a crawlspace.


I'm having trouble understanding the need for a 6 port patch panel. Can you explain where devices are located, in your house?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My cable modem is in my utility closet, on the first floor. The modem outputs on a Cat6 cable that goes upstairs into my office.


In the office, that cat6 terminates in a keystone jack (or it could terminate in a patch panel). That goes into my firewall, which then goes into my switch. The switch patches directly into several computers in the office, and also patches into a double gang keystone panel (or could be patch panel) that goes out to the rest of the house.


All in all, 9 runs terminate in the office, from throughout the house.
 

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What about bringing the cat5's thru a 1" high X 2" wide slot that is exactly where you want the patch panel. Then get 1 1/2" nylon standoffs (also known as spacers) and use them & drywall anchors to mount your patch panel on the wall.


It wont be flush but it will be very close to the wall and look clean. This diagram will give you an idea of what i am describing.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by 39CentStamp /forum/post/16997928


What about bringing the cat5's thru a 1" high X 2" wide slot that is exactly where you want the patch panel. Then get 1 1/2" nylon standoffs (also known as spacers) and use them & drywall anchors to mount your patch panel on the wall.

This is the best idea, so far.


Ideally, I would take this one further and see if I can find some way to make the panel easily removable
 

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I tried to find the same thing, ended up using some modules in the structured wiring box, and some bulk-entry faceplates.


The best alternatives I found (but didn't end up using), were the hinged, wall-mount patch panel brackets at monoprice, or the PPM-2 or -4 wall mounted rack enclosures from Middle Atlantic. I probably would have used the 6" deep PPM-4 if I had gone that route.

http://www.middleatlantic.com/dcm/wall/ppm.htm



Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor /forum/post/17001568


I tried to find the same thing, ended up using some modules in the structured wiring box, and some bulk-entry faceplates.


The best alternatives I found (but didn't end up using), were the hinged, wall-mount patch panel brackets at monoprice, or the PPM-2 or -4 wall mounted rack enclosures from Middle Atlantic. I probably would have used the 6" deep PPM-4 if I had gone that route.

http://www.middleatlantic.com/dcm/wall/ppm.htm



Jeff

Those look kinda nice. I might go that route eventually...
 
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