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I read a COMDEX report that had some info on new products from Linksys. Report is that they now have a product to distribute the video signal with a wireless device. I believe there are some resolution limitations. Anyone care to elaborate?


This will make for some super clean installs. Okay so you still need power. Wireless HDTV can't be too far off!
 

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You could transmit power wirelessly as well. Use a 100,000 watt RF amp you'll get a good 200 watts received :)


Seriously, I would only consider one of these devices if it sent over the Mpeg-HL or HDCP information in a compressed format. A lossless compression scheme won't do be able to handle the bandwidth of HD or computer graphics.


I don't know exactly what product you are refering to, but be aware of some of the interference issues that some of the technologies have, bluetooth and microwave ovens being a big one.


Sounds cool.


-Mr. Wigggles
 

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As someone with an 802.11b wireless network in my home, I can tell you that these work, but are probably not yet reliable enough for enjoyable video. Due to interference, these networks sometimes step down in speed or suffer delays. Their bandwidth is limited, and they seldom achieve the claimed throughputs.


I think there's a lot of potential here, but I'm not holding my breath for wireless HD.
 

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One interesting problem is that 802.11a protocol stack will take some processing time. This will make synchronizing the audio and video more interesting. :)


There is certainly the bandwidth with 802.11a.


We've numerous 802.11a Access Points and Access Cards at the office and they rock. The next wave of wireless is just about upon us and it isn't 3G. :)

-=-

Mark
 

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Or, the next step, wireless video transfer straight into our eyes! How cool is that? Oh wait.. we already have that..


Come on, the obvious smart thing would be to move the player/HTPC closer to the projector. We do have remote-controls.

:)
 

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Yes. i am in NO way intrested in having large amounts of RF ripping around my living space. Thank you very much. We have enough crap in the air, we don't need more.


And the bandwidth and freq. range required for HD transmission is not the kind of freqs. you want in your living space, I suspect.
 

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I can't wait for a lossless, wireless connection to my projector! Then again, the projector won't be a permanently installed so I'll be able to use it in multiple rooms or outdoors without pulling wires everywhere. Or perhaps I'll get a few projectors and multi-cast to them. Like I said, I can't wait.


As for RF ripping through my living space, it already does and has been since before I was born. Including the HDTV transmitted over the air.
 

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802.11a&b both use the unlicensed 2.4GHz spectrum, which is getting quite a bit of use. Many cordless phones are now in this piece of spectrum as is bluetooth. I currently use a 802.11b setup at home (wireless broadband net + laptop = PC geek heaven!) and have been very reluctant to get one of the new cordless phones because of interference issues. Also, my "strength" meter can vary from 5 bars (full) to 3 bars depending on its mood and my location, it's ok for data and internet as the slowest data rate (1.5mb/s?) is still faster than my DSL connection, but I'm not sure video would like that kind of variety.


someday, however...


jake
 

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Correction to the last post - 802.11a is in the 5.2Ghz band, not the 2.4G band where 802.11b resides. Both of these are spread spectrum, low power signals. I don't think there is any reason to worry about being exposed to these signals.


In the early days of 802.11 technology, CIO's and others in hospitals for example, had worries about the health impact of wireless technologies. These concerns have all but dissappeared now, and 802.11 is implemented in all kinds of places. If hospitals are OK with it, then I think that most home users will not have a concern, and will adopt the technology if it delivers benefits.


When 802.11a hits, with its maximum bandwidth of 54Mbps (the starting point), then all kinds of interesting home applications will open, up including video distribution. The cost points will likely even by lower than the stuff you can buy today. I think the technology has great potential - now Bluetooth is another story.
 
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