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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was down at a friends audio/video shop, and he told me about an experiment he had done with liquid nitrogen and audio CD's. He made 2 copies of a CD and froze one in the nitrogen, the other he left alone. After playing them back, he found a definate improvement. Out of curiosity, he made 2 more copies but this time put one in his freezer for a few days. Surprizingly, it worked!


I thought he was nuts until he auditioned the 2 CD's for me back to back. Unbelievably, there was a distinct improvement in the overall sound, more than what you get from better cables! He then played 2 DVD's that he tried the freezing on one of them and again there was a slight improvement in the picture! It's not a real big difference but it was noticeable. You have to have 2 identical DVD's, and play them back to back to notice the difference but it is there!


I've had my gun barrels cyroed on my match guns, so I know it works but never thought it would work on stuff like this! I can just imagine what my wife will think when she opens the freezer and finds a bunch of CD's and DVD's in there!


Hope one of you will try this and report back, remember the change is very slight so you really need to have 2 copies to audition back to back. Good luck!
 

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This is a joke right?
 

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I will admit to being a skeptic but there seems to be some interest here so have at it!


Mark:cool:
 

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Skepticism is healthy, but this "tweak" has been the subject of debate by respected audiophile forums for at least a decade, and at least insofar as audio CDs, has some support. How and why it makes a supposed difference is speculation. The error-correction circuitry of older CD transports clearly generated distortion,,,one theory was that the cryo-treated discs' optical characteristics (ie. transparent coating) was improved from the laser-reading perspective, generating fewer errors to be dealt with by the transport. Who knows. The fun part is, this is a FREE tweak that anyone can try for themselves. Do it in true blind fashion...have someone else change the discs and see if you can tell. Most reviewers found no change in DVD or SACD, but a significant group noted changes, generally for the better, in "redbook" cd. Please hold the flames, I'm simply suggesting a fun little experiment.
 

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Yes,


This and other technologies to "improve" CDs in various ways have been talked about for quite a few years.


The freezing process is supposed to marginally improve laser reflectability. This, in turn, produces less data errors and is supposed to improve S/N ratio - and thus improve PQ. AFAIK, there's been no conclusive proof by anyone serious that shows this is the case.


There are other technologies that claim to do something similar. A while back "secrets of home theater hifi" were doing an insight into a device that you put a CD or DVD on and "magically" (it claims to do something magnetic or something with ions I don't really know) reduce the error rate and perform a similar type of improvement.


Personally, I've never tried this and it sounds psychosomatic to me.


Could be interesting to ask someone like hometheaterhifi to run a test on this and compare CDs or DVDs using actual instrumentation to see if the disks REALLY behave any differently after the freezing process.


In my personal opinion this is an urban legend.
 

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It absolutely works.


I've used this technique (putting 'em in the freezer) on three seperate DOA DVDs and after the 'treatment' each one began working after not working on three seperate players.


Been doing this for years, and it also works on CDs and GDs (Sega Dreamcast discs which is when I started doing this years back).


Believe it...or not.
 

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Freezing CDs has been kicked around in the land of High End Audio for quite some time. It's actually amazing how many tweaks there are for CDs.

I don't know if any of them actually work.


Frankly, my most embarrassing purchase was a CD tweak device (years ago...), called the Bedini CD Clarifier. It was a sort of degausser for CDs.

In the store demo, the salasman had me feeling it had made a sonic difference with CDs it had "de-magnatized." I got it home and, without the influence of a salesman, couldn't hear a whit of difference after "clarifying" my CDs.


It now sits, gathering dust in the basement...as a cautious reminder to me...


Rich H.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I know it sounds hard to believe but there was a definate improvement with the CD's and only a very slight improvement on the DVD. Unlike your salesman Rich, my friend wasn't trying to sell anything, just showing me somthing that had an effect on the sound and picture quality.


It's free, so what do you have to lose! Find someone with an identical DVD or make 2 copies of a CD and see if there's any difference. If you don't see or hear any difference then don't do it anymore. If you do get some kind of improvement, it doesn't cost you anything to treat the rest of your collection. Remember, the difference with DVD's was very slight! Don't expect a huge difference! I should have checked if there was any improvement in the sound quality on the DVD, maybe next time. Oh yeah, he did say to leave it in for a few days or atleast 30 hrs.
 

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Rich,


THAT'S THE ONE!


That's the one that "Secrets..." reviewed (actually it was Bedini's version 2 degauser). Read the article.


There's been a ton of requests for them to do an objective test on this (by comparing the bandwidth outputs before or after). They promised to do it, but it was never followed through...
 

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These things are digital, for crying out loud! How could it make a difference?


That said, I guess I'll try it...
 

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The physics escapes me on digital media. However, years ago we put troublesome cassette tapes with Commodore PET programs on them in the freezer for a while & they would then load.


For you youngsters, the PET was one of the early personal computers. The screen, keyboard & MOBO were all-in-one. No mouse. Circa 1976.
 

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zambraetzu,


Not quite. Digital has error correction. Sounds are better when you have more bits. If there are errors, you are getting less bits. The theory (never been proven!!!) is that the freezing, particularly on CDs which have virtually error correction and are basically PCM causes reflection to go up and thus all the bits that are on the CD get into the system with less (or without any) errors.


All of these techniques (including "degausing" of the CD) attempt to reduce bit errors.
 
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