AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I measured my sub from 120hz down through 20hz. If I draw a line down the middle of the graph, the highest peak is 4dB up and the lowest null is 4dB down from that center line. In other words, there is a 8dB difference between the highest and the lowest.


Is this considered +-4dB frequency response, which I guess is pretty good, or is this a +-8dB frequency response, which still might not be considered bad, but I may do some more work.


Any thoughts

Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ethan,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer
Neither. Your true response varies more like 25 or even 35 dB throughout the bass range. I assume you "measured" using a third octave test CD? That gives only the crudest assessment because peaks and nulls are much narrower than one third octave. Especially nulls. So what you measured ignores the true extent of the nulls.



--Ethan
I used the 1/6th octave tones from Snapbug. Isn't it true that the narrower the dip is, the less it would be noticed in everyday music and movies, since most instuments and sounds would straddle any given frequency point even if it was a single note?

Part of me wants to bury my head in the sand and not dig any deeper to find more flaws anyway ;) . If I keep telling myself I have a good response, I can relax and enjoy some music and movies for once :D


Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,603 Posts
Quote:
... I can relax and enjoy some music and movies for once
How dare you! :p

It's nice to not lose sight of the real goal here, isn't it. It took me about a year of tweaking and calibrating to get to that point with my projection TV, and now I'm just about there with my sound system.


Whew!



Tim
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top