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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've moved from a big room to a small one (14x14, 7' ceilings). My viewing distance cannot feasibly be made much more than about 9' 6". My current projector is an LCD and the screen dooring is now very irritating. (It wasn't a problem in the old house when I had a viewing distance of around 15'.)


So now I'm looking into a new projector. I've seen the DLP-based Sharp XV9000, and it's very nice. Its minimum throw distance is 12', which is about the maximum that I can manage. I know basically nothing about LCOS, but I understand that it generally has less problems with screen door. A quick search on Google seems to turn up only the Dukane 9115 as an LCOS front projector.


What other projectors should I be considering?


Oh-- one more thing. Do either of these have direct-access remote codes to select aspect ratio and associated modes? One problem with my Sharp DW100U is that its aspect ratio control is a rotating operation (ie click until you see what you want), and apparently there is no direct command to change it to 16:9 or 4:3 mode.
 

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You might want to consider using a first surface mirror and pick up that extra throw distance by folding the image back to your screen while the pj points at you...assuming you can flip the image in your pj.
 

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BLW,


Please clarify "the min throw distance of the sharp is 12'". I hope that is for your existing screen size. I am ready to buy one and only have about 10 feet or so from wall to wall. I realize this is going to give me about a 67" wide screen, but will the sharp produce a picture that small?



Please help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a DW100U, the LCD version today. It's got to go, because of the screendooring.


The spec on Sharp's web site shows "minimum throw distance = 12 feet" - more specifically, with my EXISTING screen, which is 92" diagonal in 16:9 format.


I can't find that page at the moment (!?) but I would think that if you're expecting a smaller image, that'd be fine. I've already got ~$4K invested in my screen (it's a retractable microperf one), so I clearly want to preserve it is possible.


I had not thought of using a first-surface mirror to gain throw distance. Offhand I can't figure out how I'd do that as I also have a problem with a low ceiling. My house is 150 years old and my room is in the basement. The house was originally built with a root cellar, rather than a full basement, and the ceilings are all quite low - 7' 1" in this case. With 45" of image height and at least another 17" or so worth of miscellaneous screen accutrements (housing, drop distance, bottom fringe, etc), I have almost no space above or below the image from which to throw the source!


I came from a 24x17 room, and I never really appreciated how much flexibility it gave me.
 

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In such a small room you should look for projectors with a short throw distance.

IMO, your ideal candidate is the Marantz VP-12S1. For a 92"-diagonal widescreen, the minimum throw distance is about 10 ft. Also, it has good resolution (1280x720) and it's DLP so screendoor will be minimized.
 

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If you really want a long throw projector:


Think about hanging it on the rear wall vertically and using a front surface mirror. Make SURE that orientation is acceptable and warranteed with any projector you choose. Some bulbs have problems with abnormal orientation.


This actually solves a lot of problems. Since your screen is 17" off the ceiling, a digital projector would have to be that low or use keystone. Keystone is VERY bad to use on digital projectors, unlike CRTs.


You could aim it at the floor. The wires will run directly into the ceiling, the mirror will be near screen top height.


You could aim it at the ceiling. The wires will point at the floor, the projector controls will be lower and more accessible.


My recommendation though:


The Marantz (as mentioned) is very short throw and could easily be stood off from the ceiling or on a shelf on the rear wall and fill the screen. The sweet viewing spot is with it directly overhead!


My friend Amir has his mounted in a room almost the same size as yours though he doesn't have the drop distance of a retractable screen to contend with. He uses a 100" diagonal screen and it is perfect. My projector is stood WAY off the ceiling so the image clears my old CRT that provides the kids with cartoons all day...I sit right under it. Though I could not walk under it, it does not affect seated comfort. At your seated distance, you will see all image, no pixels on that size screen.


Good luck, and PM me if you are interested in that front mirror idea. I have a box of them in the attic I bought to experiment with, and my brother builds custom telescopes. He could machine you a housing. This is all very experimental, though. It would take a lot of careful calculations and measurement to get right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
FlatusM- thanks for the suggestions. I am not particular to a long-throw projector; it's just that the one I have seen and know I like is such a unit.


I have just learned of the Marantz unit in the past couple of days. It appears to solve the problems, although it also appears to be bordering on twice the price of a Sharp XV9000? Sharps are fairly easy to buy at $7K or so, and so far I have contacted two dealers who are not budging from the $13K list price on the Marantz.


I'm surprised at your keystoning comments. I find the digital keystoning on the Sharp DW100U to be dead easy to use, and I had the image lined up within about two pixels all the way up and down the time back in my previous room.


On mirrors: I think I'd need to have some place in front of the screen that has a place for a (fairly large?) mirror. Hard to imagine in my room, which at the moment has a *brick* floor! How would this be arranged?
 

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No, no, I am talking about a 4" x 6" mirror positioned 3-12" in front of the projector lens bending the light 90 degrees to the screen. This would give you up to a foot plus the length of the projecter in throw increase. This would allow most 'long' throw projectors.


The keystone issue is not that it is hard, but that it decreases the number of active pixels and forces the scaler to recalculate everything for fractional widths and less rows. This is not too big of a deal on DVD, but on HDTV or computer using the full panel, it will cause information to be lost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I get it now. I was thikning of a rear projection type of installation (not an all-in-one unit like a Pioneer Elite 710, but using what would otherwise be a front projector). You're really just changing the angle of the projector and adding a little bit of throw distance (which is all I need).


I probably did not notice the issues with keystoning previously as I have no HD tuner, so we used almost exclusively DVD and - shrunken - 4:3 regular TV.
 
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