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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed that some front speakers have built-in sub (for example, Polk RTi A7). Most likely than not, these built-in subs are not good at producing lows as dedicated subs from manufacturers such as eD, av123, and SVS. Therefore, purchasing a sub is highly recommended in HT.


So here is my question: if you have a great sub (or dual sub) from one of the aforementioned manufacturers, is having a built-in sub still useful? I am wondering if some money can be saved by purchasing RTi 8 / A5 as oppose to A7.


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by robchow /forum/post/15537348



So here is my question: if you have a great sub (or dual sub) from one of the aforementioned manufacturers, is having a built-in sub still useful?

Thanks

Not really...It all depends on what frequencies everything crosses over at...But generally speaking I would go ahead and get non built in sub speakers...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by robchow /forum/post/15537348


I have noticed that some front speakers have built-in sub (for example, Polk RTi A7). Most likely than not, these built-in subs are not good at producing lows as dedicated subs from manufacturers such as eD, av123, and SVS. Therefore, purchasing a sub is highly recommended in HT.


So here is my question: if you have a great sub (or dual sub) from one of the aforementioned manufacturers, is having a built-in sub still useful? I am wondering if some money can be saved by purchasing RTi 8 / A5 as oppose to A7.


Thanks

Your assumption that "...these built-in subs are not good at producing lows as dedicated subs..." is absolutely correct.
http://www.polkaudio.com/homeaudio/rtia/specs.php

The RTi A7 has -3 dB point of 35 Hz. That's it's "usable" low frequency extension. (Ignore the FR spec of 20Hz to 27 kHz, because without a stated -3 dB point, it is meaningless.) A speaker with response to 35 Hz is not a "full-range" speaker. If you send it a "full-range" signal and it can't reproduce most of the lowest octave, (20 to 40 Hz would be the first audible octave), then you're throwing away that deepest bass. If you have a "great sub (or dual sub)", then sending that deepest bass to you subwoofer)s) will ensure that you hear it.


I would never consider purchasing a speaker with built-in powered woofers, (these are generally *not* "sub"-woofers), for an HT system with an already "great" subwoofer system. I would get speakers with "decent" bass response, (at least 60 Hz), and then us the Bass Management capabilities of my receiver/pre/pro to re-direct the deepest bass to the subs.


For a 2-channel, music-only system, I might consider speakers with powered woofers. I actually had a pair, (AV123 Strata Mini's, -3 dB @ 28 Hz.) They had plenty of bass for music. However, for movie bass effects... not a chance. Run "full-range", they were useless trying to keep up with the subs, (dual JL Audio F112's.) Cut 'em at 80 Hz, and you've spent a bunch of $$$ for an amp, driver and box that you're not using. Not an efficient way to design an HT system.


Craig
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the responses. This is going to save me some money as I put it toward a "great" sub (I am considering SVS PC12-Plus).
 
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