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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What contrast/brightness settings do you all use?


I have had my display calibrated (actually, twice!) using Gamma 1, with Contrast at -24 and Brightness at +3, with user RGB settings, set by Cliff Plavin.


But I still see quite a lot of noise, the blacks are speckled, and I get that mossy "contouring" effect. I tried resetting the brightness last night, using Gamma 4, and the picture improved (for DVDs, anyway).


So I thought I query you all about your settings.
 

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I'm not sure how useful this is, as there are other variables (such as the source and variation between individual plasma units), but here are my settings for my 5002:


VGA: contrast -15, brightness +15, color -17, tint +5, sharpness -5, gamma dynamic 1, color temp warm


S-video: contrast -3, brightness -7, color -26, tint +5, sharpness -5, gamma dynamic 1, color temp warm, noise reduction off


Component: contrast -12, brightness +6, color +1, tint 0, sharpness -10, gamma dynamic 1, color temp warm
 

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Dfletcher,


Your calibration settings are quite unique as your Panasonic RP-91 which has adjustable Gamma control in the software provided an additional feature to deal with that most others do not have accessable in their systems. To make any type of comparison at all you would need to compare the same model with similar hours and the exact same source signal. This would still be stretching things as the glass being produced from different lots for the two panels and having different factory internal calibrations would make a valid comparison virtually useless.


Your calibration was optimized using the "User" color temperature adjustment to achieve a flat Grayscale tracking response. This was achieved within 150 degrees over the entire range from 0-100 ire. We both viewed different Gamma settings and agreed that by selecting other modes that the tracking was not as accurate and either crushed the Blacks or elevated them to an unnatural state.


You agreed after I demonstrated to you what happens to the Fujitsu glass when you adjust the Brightness one or two clicks above its ideal calibration point. The posterization artifacts in this glass become visible and seriously detract from the viewing experience. We demonstrated this while watching the Masters Golf tournament viewing Tiger Woods Black pants. With the brightness elevated (as little as two clicks) posterization was readily apparent. With brightness set properly posterization was greatly reduced and a more natural PQ was seen.


The Fujitsu panel only allows for one user calibration in its software. This limits the calibration to being able to optimize the panel for either viewing DVD's correctly or one other source such as your set top box for STD definition or HDTV broadcasts. All of these signals require different RGB settings in the user calibration to be ideal. The panel limits your selection to only one source.


Cliff
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree with everything you have said, Cliff, and I intend to use the settings that we set when you came over. I was just interested in seeing what everybody else is doing. It does seem to me that the settings don't work for every source, that my HDTV source is too dark and contrasty for HBO tv programs, and some DVDs need a brighter, flatter setting (such as Se7en and some others). Gamma 4 and Gamma 2 have a "flatter" look to them, less contrast, and this seems to be good for certain movies and programs.


No criticism intended here, and I do recognize that everyone's setup is different. I'm a naturally dissatisfied person, so after a few months of watching these settings, I'm looking to make some more improvements.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ghibliss
The Fujitsu panel only allows for one user calibration in its software. This limits the calibration to being able to optimize the panel for either viewing DVD's correctly or one other source such as your set top box for STD definition or HDTV broadcasts. All of these signals require different RGB settings in the user calibration to be ideal. The panel limits your selection to only one source.


Cliff
Cliff, are you saying that when you define a user color temperature, it's the same definition for every video source (composite, svideo, component, RGB) when User is selected instead of Warm, Standard or Cool?


I'm considering buying this model and want to understand its limitations. Thanks.
 

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"Cliff, are you saying that when you define a user color temperature, it's the same definition for every video source (composite, svideo, component, RGB) when User is selected instead of Warm, Standard or Cool? "


You only have the ability to perform a White Balance calibration in the Fujitsu software for "User". This means that you have the ability to optimize for only one source signal which ever one you prefer to put in the memory location. If you decide to watch a different source then you obviously will not have a display that has been optimized for that signal.


Your only option is to perform a calibration for each source on the display in the "user mode" and record the values for each of these sources on a sheet of paper. When you change sources you may then manually change the values in the "user" mode for the RGB White balance settings. It is certainly a major inconvenience given the price of admission for the product.


Marantz, NEC, Panasonic, Pioneer, RCA (Scenium), Sharp, to name just a few brands all offer calibrations per input. The Pioneer even goes a step further allowing calibration by fequency per input. This provides the greatest degree of flexibility in programming the display as you may switch for example from SDTV to HDTV on your STB and the panel will utilize the proper calibration automatically.


I would select the NEC 61" panel and use an external processor due to the greater flexibility that the software provides. Optimizing the picture quality for all source signals connected to the display is certainly a high priority for any customer spending this amount of money. Compromised calibrations are not something that they want to be told they must live with in a system at this level.
 

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my fuji5001 settings:


contrast -7

brightness +3

sharpness -10

standard color temp

dynamic 4 for dvd

static for rgb2 input from zenith dtv1080 receiver


i dont notice any contouring or mossy effect, but sometimes the greens appear artificial and neon-like. i sit about 13feet away.


another apparent problem that i havent seen mentioned before: when objects get panned accross the screen, the colors of that object get severely distorted. its as if certain colors can not keep up with the others so it results in ugly bands. this happens on every input whether im watching tv or playing playstation. it also happens on my windows desktop, where if i drag a window around, the smooth gradient on the top bar gets broken up until i stop moving it, then everything returns to normal. still pictures look fine.


any clues anyone?


jun
 

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ghibliss


Quote


"Marantz, NEC, Panasonic, Pioneer, RCA (Scenium), Sharp, to name just a few brands all offer calibrations per input. The Pioneer even goes a step further allowing calibration by fequency per input. This provides the greatest degree of flexibility in programming the display as you may switch for example from SDTV to HDTV on your STB and the panel will utilize the proper calibration automatically."


If I am not mistaken the Panasonic also allows this type of flexibility.


Dave
 
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