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Sorry for the newb question (yeah, 2nd post, lol) I just picked up a 32inch LG LCD which is being hung upstairs in my bedroom. Downstairs I have my HT setup (43inch Panny RP, Onkyo S780, PS3, Samsung HD960 DVD, Monoprice 5x1 HDMI switch, Harmony 550, ExpressVu HD 6100). I would like to run HDMI upstairs so I can get some highdef for watching TV, to go along with the Samsung HD850 that is also upstairs. I am wondering how long is to long when it comes to HDMI? I should be under 50ft for the entire run (way under). Running HDMI would be alot easier seeing that the 550 can control the ExpressVu from anywhere in the house and its only 1 eire, compared to installing another ExpressVu box upstairs...


Any thoughts? Should I go about this a different way?
 

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HDMI, is a pure digital connection. So it will either work or it won't. If it works it should be clear, and if it doesn't work well...it won't work. Most HDMI cables are rated at 12 meters max. So you are close. I suspect that a good quality cable that long would be quite pricey.
 

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At 15 meters you will probably not support 1080P and you will definitly NOT support 1.3.

However the only thing that you will need 1.3 for in the near (and not near future) is DTS HD Master Audio (Dolby HD & DTS HD High Resolution Audio will work with 1.1 & 1.2).

All of the other 1.3 features will require expensive hardware and media changes.

Pinenuts answer is a fairly common one and not entirely accurate.

The quantity AND quality of the picture and sound data (1's and 0's) as well as other things such as clocking play a big role in how will the system works.

It is possible for a cable to work fine with a fairly static picture @ 1080i but lock up or get sparkles under fast action motion scenes.

It is recommended that you first check your longer cable with the gear that you will be using before you put it in the wall.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent McCall /forum/post/0


At 15 meters you will probably not support 1080P and you will definitly NOT support 1.3.

However the only thing that you will need 1.3 for in the near (and not near future) is DTS HD Master Audio (Dolby HD & DTS HD High Resolution Audio will work with 1.1 & 1.2).

All of the other 1.3 features will require expensive hardware and media changes.

Pinenuts answer is a fairly common one and not entirely accurate.

The quantity AND quality of the picture and sound data (1's and 0's) as well as other things such as clocking play a big role in how will the system works.

It is possible for a cable to work fine with a fairly static picture @ 1080i but lock up or get sparkles under fast action motion scenes.

It is recommended that you first check your longer cable with the gear that you will be using before you put it in the wall.

You should not post such bad information if you don't have conclusive proof. I'm running 1080P from a PS3 to my LCD tv through a 40ft cable. And so are many on the forum. Yes test it first is good advice but you can buy cables for up to 50ft runs and if you search this forum you'll find that the cable effect of sending HDMI 1.3 is not more difficult then the 1.1 protocal. Link to article on cables and HDMI 1.3 requirments
 

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No problem running 1080p from a PS3 to a projector out to 40 ft (~12 mtr) here. Others may have a different story but a mono hdmi cable works perfectly with no sparkelies or dropouts at this length for me.
 

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Besides cable quality, there are two significant factors that will determine whether you can run a ~50ft cable cleanly:

1) quality of the HDMI receiver chip in your TV (i.e. if it has an equalizer, which generally enables significantly longer cable runs). I've seen demonstrations by chip makers that showed a 50ft normal HDMI cable run at 1080p (clean of course), and >75ft at 720p. Unfortunatley, the inclusion of an equalizer is difficult to determine as TV manufacturers don't (yet) brand such a capability. In general, the vast majority of 1080p displays can be expected to use an HDMI receiver chip with an equalizer.


2) what video resolution you require to be support. A 720p/1080i signal can be sent over a longer cable compared to a 1080p signal (which is twice the video bandwidth of 720p/1080i).


There are quite a number of cost effective HDMI "booster" boxes (small boxes which go in-line between 2 daisy chained HDMI cables) which have discrete equalizer electronics in them. I've seen these products support 30-50ft runs at 1080p in trade show demonstrations. Finally, I've seen one manufacturer that designs very long (up to 100ft) HDMI cables that integrate the equalizer electronics into the connector's overmold. These cables look & feel like a regular cable (no dedicated power required usually since they get power from the HDMI 5V pin), but can yield the performance of using actively powered boosters.


I just posted this new thread as well that goes into more cable details that may be of interest to you.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=794088
 
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