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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm surprised the used the marketing term "Full HD" in the article for 1080P. There is no such thing. It's HD. It was just a made up phrase for marketing. Not any official nomenclature.
The very first paragraph further defines the graphic, so not sure what got your goat about it.

"4K (Ultra High Definition / UHD) has matured far more rapidly compared to the transition from standard definition to HD (720p) / FHD (1080p). This can be attributed to the rise in popularity of displays with high pixel density as well as support for recording 4K media in smartphones and action cameras on the consumer side. However, movies and broadcast media continue to be the drivers for 4K televisions. Cinemal 4K is 4096x2304, while true 4K is 4096x2160. Ultra HD / UHD / QFHD all refer to a resolution of 3840x2160. Despite the differences, '4K' has become entrenched in the minds of the consumers as a reference to UHD. Hence, we will be using them interchangeably in the rest of this piece."
 

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If you go back just a few years ago you might have a PC or device that said it supported 1080p, and while that was true it had a bit rate limitation - you couldn't play a remux of something like Avatar.
 

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The very first paragraph further defines the graphic, so not sure what got your goat about it.

"4K (Ultra High Definition / UHD) has matured far more rapidly compared to the transition from standard definition to HD (720p) / FHD (1080p). This can be attributed to the rise in popularity of displays with high pixel density as well as support for recording 4K media in smartphones and action cameras on the consumer side. However, movies and broadcast media continue to be the drivers for 4K televisions. Cinemal 4K is 4096x2304, while true 4K is 4096x2160. Ultra HD / UHD / QFHD all refer to a resolution of 3840x2160. Despite the differences, '4K' has become entrenched in the minds of the consumers as a reference to UHD. Hence, we will be using them interchangeably in the rest of this piece."
Ya, pretty much.

Back in the early transition days many TVs were either 720p or 1080p still. Consumers just thought "HD" is "HD" and didn't yet understand pixel count like we do today since back then it was new to joe-consumer.

So FHD was used to differentiate from 720p (still considered HD). It's pretty straightforward and not a gimmick.
 
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