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I did some searching - here & in the archives, but didn't find an answer.. Manual offers no help either..


What is the difference between these two input settings? I get a similar picture from both, and HDTV-GBR gives me more control over the picture (color/hue/sharpness). Just curious more than anything I guess, but there must be some reason to include both on the set.. I'm feeding it for now from the RGB HD15 output on my SIR-TS360..


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Funny how things like this happen, just yesterday I noticed the same thing, and had a discussion about it with somebody.....I believe (could be total wrong) GBR is an acronym for Great Britain, and may have some more adjustment for a PAL signal.
 

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Hi

Can't help with the difference but :-


GRB (green, red & blue; RGB)

The three primary colors used in video processing, often referring to the three unencoded outputs of a color camera. The sequence of GBR indicates the mechanical sequence of the connectors in the SMPTE standard.


Richard
 

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The SMPTE/EBU component standard specifies that the Y (luminance) signal is on channel one, the blue color difference signal is on channel two, and the red color difference signal is on channel three. Since luminance carries the sync information in color difference formats, and green carries the sync information in RGB, hardware compatibility is achieved by putting the green signal on channel one. Sync will thus always be on the same channel. (Although SMPTE RGB has sync on all channels, this is not always the case in other RGB formats.)


For similar reasons, the blue signal is put on channel two like the blue color difference signal, and the red signal is put on channel three like the red color difference signal. It therefore seems appropriate to call the SMPTE format "GBR'' rather than "RGB.'' In the rest of this appendix, we will use the term GBR. Time will tell which term remains in common usage.......

http://www.tek.com/Measurement/cgi-b...Set=television
 
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