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Hi Guys,


I just bought a Nintendo Gamecube to go with my Nec VT540 projector, and am extremely keen to see it running in Hi-resolution.


The Gamecube has support for Hi-def tv's via a component digital out port, however the Gamecube doesn't support VGA or RGB.


Not a big problem as my projector accepts a component signal, but the only cable available from Nintendo has a proprietory connector at one end and splits into three RCA type connector plugs at the other, whereas I need one which goes to a VGA style connector.


Am I making sense?


Anyone heard of an alternate cable, or have the knowledge on how to rewire the standard Nintendo cable so that the 3 connectors become one (so to speak) ?


Hoping someone can help. :confused:


Cheers,



Wayne.



* Woohoo. Done and done. See below :D
 

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Well, this is not the most elegant solution, but you could buy the NEC cable with HD-15 (VGA) at one end, and 3XRCA at the other, and use 3 RCA female/female barrel connectors to connect the two cables.


If the gamecube becomes popular, somebody will make the cable you need, but the 3XRCA cable you described is correct for most HDTVs today.


Gary
 

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Gary,


Where would you find a cable with D-Sub on one end and 3XRCA on the other?


Wayne.w,


Have you tried this? Does it work?


-------------------------


I hope this works, especailly since I just got this from Nintendo. (lame):


"Hello and thank you for contacting Nintendo,


Currently, there are no plans to make an adapter that would allow you to connect your NINTENDO GAMECUBE to a PC monitor. If that ever changes, we'll make sure to post it on our website or a future issue of Nintendo Power.


One more thing, I wanted to let you know that we are inviting all of our consumers with Internet access to sign-up for the Nintendo Power Source and receive free E-mail updates about all of the hottest Nintendo news. To sign up for our Newsletter, go to www.nintendo.com and click on the Newsletter icon located on the right-side of the screen.


Nintendo of America Inc.

Dervin Camden


Nintendo's home page: http://www.nintendo.com/

Power Line (Automated Product Info): (425) 885-7529"
 

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Nintendo is referring to RGB signals not being supported. However, if your PJ supports component then the above setup should work. You need to change the VGA input to component instead of RGB in menu and it should work.


Breakout cable (VGA-->5 BNC or VGA-->3RCA) can be found at www.a2zcables.com ($40 for 20 footer) or www.pccables.com (only BNC variant). If you go with 5 BNC then just connect R, G, B wires and leave the other 2 dangling. You'll need BNC (female) to RCA (female) adaptors (available at Ratshack or above companies for $2-3 each X 3). This setup will save you the barrel connectors. The RCA breakout cable will need female RCA to female RCA barrel connectors (avail. at same places).
 

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Huey,


SWEET!!! Thanks man. I have a D-sub-to-RGBHV cable laying around that should would great. I didn't know if you needed to send sync, or what.


I'll order up a Gamecube component cable and post my results.


Thanks again!
 

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Hi Guys.


Well it took awhile to get all the necessary parts, but I've finally got my Gamecube hooked up to my NEC540 projector via a component cable.


As you guys suggested, I ordered a Component video cable from NEC (plugs into the RGB monitor port on the projector), and the Component cable from Nintendo (plugs into the digital out port on the Gamecube) and used 3x male to male adaptors to connect the two together.


I really didn't know what to expect. There's been a lot of debate raging on this forum as to exactly how good the image would be. Mostly concerning the differences between 480i,480p,720p, and 1080i. Admittedly a lot of them relate to the Xbox but all the same it's enough to drive you crazy.


So here's my results for the lay-person.


Firstly, what can you expect? First of all it didn't make for higher resolution images in the traditional sense. ie: Like with a PC where you change from 320x200 to 640x400, or 1024x768.

For example, the Menu Text in Rogue Leader and Pikmin stayed the same size and all the graphics held much the same detail as when not using the component cable. Textures weren't more detailed, etc..


At first this might seem like a bit of a let down, but it wasn't. Because using the component cable brings about 3 other equally as impressive effects:


1. The image is MUCH sharper/clearer.

Anyone who has played console games on a projector knows that using the standard composite or even s-video cable results in a blurry mess, making it almost not worth the effort. Here the component cable is a dream come true because it has the effect of giving games razor sharp crisp edges with zero fuzziness.


2. The colors are brighter.

I had heard this before and thought so what. After all can't I just increase the color settings on my projector? Shows how little I knew. The combined effect of more saturated colors and the improved clarity results in a much more 3D look and feel to things.

The images almost leap off the wall/screen.


3. Progressive Scan.

Ok here goes. I'm no techie, and the whole point of this post is to give it to ya straight, so this is how I sees it.

The standard analog output from the Gamecube, N64, PS1, PS2 uses a trick called 'interlacing' to give the illusion/impression of a high-resolution display (say 640x400). For every image/screen that you see two seperate images are actually produced. Each one has just half the amount of data to be displayed (320x200 pixels), which is the equivalent of drawing every second horizontal line on your tv/projector. The computer (Gamecube in this case) very rapidly flicks back and forward between them tricking your brain into thinking you're seeing one high-resolution image. (And this is what causes the flickering which is so common on the PS1 and can also be seen on the intro to Luigi's Mansion running on composite cable).

Why is this done? My understanding is that by drawing only half the information at any one time, it was a way for these older machines (N64,PS1) to avoid the enevitable slowdown / framerate problems they would have if they had to do twice the work when displaying hi-resolution images, and (esp. for GC,PS2) because of the limitation of regular tv sets to be able to display true hi-resolution images.


My point? The GC is plenty powerful. And when using the digital-out port with the component cable, it is easily able to generate true high-resolution images (ie: display 640x400+ at once).

You need a HDTV set or compatible projector which can handle the higher resolution but the results are quite noticable.


As I mentioned earlier it's not so noticable as say the effect you got when you jumped up from the standard 320x200 display on the Nintendo64 to the 620x200(interlaced) display with the assistance of the RAM expansion pack.

But because all the information is displayed at once (rather than in two alternating views) it effectively smoothes out any 'jaggies' previously caused by only displaying every 2nd line, AND it's a rock steady display with no flickering at all.


Whew. Glad I got through that!

So in conclusion was it worth it?


Hell yeh!!

Playing the Gamecube now (particularly those games which support Progressive scan) is a real treat.

Ok, I was using a projector and so the results may have been more noticable/better on a direct view HDTV, but for me it's the closest thing to the image I get when I plug my PC into the projector at 1024x768.

Except the games are better, there's no wondows crashes, I don't have to use a keyboard, and at $199 who's complaining :D


Cheers,


Wayne.

Australia.
 
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