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Hi-

My projector (Sharp 9000) arrived Tuesday and I don't have a screen. So I painted a piece of artist canvas light gray (Behr Ultrawhite Eggshell with 4 drops of lamp black) as a temporary screen and it looks OK. Actually, it looks fantastic.


One thing of note. I used double primed, fine weave cotton canvas. I put two coats of paint on the canvas. The screen area is 72 inches wide and it shrank after each coat dried. The total shrinkage was over 2 inches. If this were supposed to be a final screen, I'd be a little short.


Now I wonder what I should do for a final screen. I like my temp screen, therefore, I could buy Goo to create a permanent screen. Or I could buy a Firehawk. Has anyone seen the two screens?


This is not a cost thing - it is a question of quality. I don't mind spending the cash for a Firehawk if it is the superior product, but I also don't want to waste my money on something that is marginally better than Goo. I don't mind making my own screen, but I also don't want to wish I'd bought a 'real' screen everytime I sit down to watch a movie.


I'd appreciate anyone's input.


Thanks,

Tim
 

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Tim,


This is the apples and oranges debate. From everything I've read regarding the FireHawk, this is absolutely the way to go. I'm not knocking the Goo, but these are just too different to come up with any other answer. I'm currently projecting onto a wine colored wall and it looks great, albeit reddish and dark. I was projecting onto a Da-Lite Cinemavision screen and it looked great also. When the FireHawk gets here, it'll be a whole different awe factor. I've read enough threads indicating that the FireHawk is in a class all by itself. I seriously believe that the Goo is a temporary solution.


Good luck to you!
 

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Tim,


I will be painting (with screen goo CRT high gain) artist canvas primed with gesso in about 2 weeks when it gets warmer. The streteched canvas with screen goo will be my permanent screen. I haven't seen the firehawk but I can tell you how this turns out. I can even send you some digital pics. Send me a PM in a few weeks as a reminder if you want to see this. I will probably post the results in this forum anyway.
 

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hi there -


I considered the goo option also. I have the boxlight 12sf ( also a dlp) which is rated at 1000 lumens which I believe is close to the sharpvision. After checking out "goosystems sight, ie pricing procedure, conditions, drying time etc. as well as weighing in other factors I opted to bite the bullet and buy a proper screen. My selection was the grayhawk since firehawk is way to bright for my application. (I've also demoed all of the dalite and the vutec grey dove which was the best contender to grayhawk in my opinion but none of them for me gave the impression of depth the way the GH did) (66"w x 37"h 16x9) I saved some money buy making a 4" wide bevelled frame covered in heavy black velour. I ordered the stewart screen with attached snaps (they also provide the other attach to snaps which screw on to the back of the frame. The end result is an awesome screen of which the equivelant would list for over 1000. for a final cost of well under 500. With the screen goo it seemed to me like a crap shoot. If I had a home theater laboratory where I could test results mixing the different shades of gray, different gaines, etc from goo I might be able to come up with a more custom screen surface for my taste and or viewing envoironment but I'm sure I'd waste a good amount of goo in the process. I think if you are looking to do a huge wall you might consider the goo but with relatively small viewing surfaces I don't think it's worth the bother.


I would also like to mention that ralph at poli-vision was most helpful. of course I dont have his Info handy but if anyones interested i'l dig it up.


thanks!
 
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