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hi ive noticed alot of people have used greenglue to soundproof their rooms i have read all the data on the website. my question is did it work are you happy and did it stop those bass sounds from the subwoofers
 

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Yes, many of us are very happy with green glue, but don't think that a second layer of drywall with green glue will solve all your bass problems. Green glue is one important piece of a complete sound isolation strategy.
 

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I personally have not use it (yet). However, from spending countless hours reading on this forum, I do not recall reading any post where someone was unhappy after using the product. The downsides I have read are that it is expensive and messy. In other words, I do not recall anyone saying they used it and it did not work to reduce sound transmission into or out of the theater.
 

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I used GG on a basement bedroom when I finished my basement. I used double drywall and GG on the ceiling and two walls (interior). I wanted to achieve sound blockage between the bedroom and an adjacent gameroom. I insulated heavily in the ceiling joists and the interior walls as well and it works great. I plan to use it again when I start my theater in the next couple of months.
 

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Quote:
Yes, many of us are very happy with green glue

Especially happy when you're done using it
Sorry Ted.

Quite frankly, I don't know if GG helped because I have nothing to compare it with BUT, I trust the people who promoted it as effective.

Personally, after completing my room, I think the only way you''re going to get anything like complete sound isolation is to build a separate building for your HT.

I can say that in the rest of my house, the sound of the HT is non-intrusive. You know something is going on when there is large amounts of LFE going on but it is not offensive.

Also, GG is only part of the equation. Solid construction techniques and by solid I mean bunker solid, mechnical decoupling, the whole nine yards and about 9,000 yards of caulk and liquid nails.
 

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There are many, many posts on here stating that green glue works really well. However if you read the reviews on the Amazon website and other general reviews there are many disappointed customers. I have read/researched for hours on soundproofing on here and other home theatre sites.I am about to build a home theatre and have already ordered my first batch of green glue. I think it may be that many people don't use it properly and/or don't completely seal their rooms. I am trusting all the positive reviewers and advice on here. I know that there are other considerations like de-coupling from the studs, caulking etc. Also, there are some posters on here and other forums who actually sell green glue. Of course they would give it rave reviews.I am hopeful that it works as stated.
 

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I have clips and channels with OSB+GG+ 5/8" DW in theater room. On walls outside of theater room I have 5/8"DW+GG+5/8"DW- no clips or channels ie. screwed in 2 x 6 studs. Outside theater room is dead quiet......our pantry room which shares a wall with theater is 2nd quietest room in home....theater room is number one.






Yes, Green Glue works! Making note, the biggest sound leakage comes from theater room entrance door......knew that going in but incorporated double door system that which works like a charm. In terms of LF, I can barely hear rumbles if both doors are closed.
 

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I used double 1/2" drywall (found it on sale and had it in the basement before knowing I should have bought 5/8") and GG in my theater. Decoupled, caulked, heavy sealed entry door. At full volume in my basement theater, I can be directly upstairs and every one in a while I hear rumbling that sounds like very distant thunder. With the TV on upstairs I don't hardly notice anything if the kids are watching something with "normal" bass. Now pop in the LFE testing scenes and it is audible, but not distracting. Again, very distant thunder sounding.


I stretched my build over 10-12 years and the Green Glue had spilled onto a waist 2x4 after application. Fast forward 5-6 years of NO work on the theater and I was preparing for the build to start up again and the GG on the board was still super sticky and pliable. That confirmed to me that the product between my drywall layers was that same and would be doing what it was advertised to do.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lnewey6  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_9483741


hi ive noticed alot of people have used greenglue to soundproof their rooms i have read all the data on the website. my question is did it work are you happy and did it stop those bass sounds from the subwoofers

Just to throw a bit of reality on your expectations - the typical builds described here (double drywall on clips and channel with green glue) will not stop extreme low bass (20-30Hz) to any significant degree. If you are expecting to crank the theater at reference levels and not hear this kind of bass in the next room you will end up disappointed unless you go to much more extreme solutions (fully floated room within a room, significantly more mass than just double drywall, etc).
 

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The question is very difficult for anyone to answer as no one will have tried the same build with and without GG. But if you use it and you're happy with the results, then of course you will want to believe it did a difference so you can motivate the cost to yourself.



Not that my stick has been lying around as long as Bronco's, but it does seem like it will stay sticky so I do think there's a good chance that it has a true function. I have had one acoustician tell me that stopping extreme LF would have been better without it, just the added mass, but I don't think those are the frequencies that will be the most disturbing to the neighbours in my case.


No matter what, building using GG will definitely be filed under "feelgood".
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightlord  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24188363


The question is very difficult for anyone to answer as no one will have tried the same build with and without GG. But if you use it and you're happy with the results, then of course you will want to believe it did a difference so you can motivate the cost to yourself.

Ah ha! My kind of post Nightlord. After reading a lot of posts about GG, I've wondered the very same thing. Have the lab boys at GG constructed two identical rooms, with the ONLY altering difference being the GG? I'm not here to bash GG, because I'm seriously considering using it. However, what would be useful information is how much MORE (%) isolation will I gain by using it as opposed to not?


Let's assume for a moment that I've got a fairly sealed room using single 5/8" DW. I then take a measurement of what I can hear inside. (however you decide to measure is not the point.) I then install another layer of 5/8" DW at 90 degrees and offset seams. I take another measurement and I've decided that I've reduced the noise by ~70%. Now, what does adding GG to the equation add in terms of more isolation? Another 5% reduction? Or, is it more like a 20% reduction? All other factors being equal. This I believe is the $64k question that has not been answered sufficiently to help those of us still wondering make a truly informed decision. Especially if you already know your room will have other gaps (no pun intended) in the isolation equation. If I will only gain an additional 5% reduction than I have a price/benefit factor to decide on. Gaining 20% helps that decision along tremendously. Is there conclusive evidence that can put a value on the additional reduction gained by using GG, as opposed to not? What does GG have over some of the other acoustic compounds?


I also have a question on the application of GG with new construction. When putting up the first layer of DW, should GG be applied to the edges of the raw studs before the first sheet is secured with screws?


Rick
 

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For $40 bucks you can prove it to yourself. Buy a tube of GG and two sheets of 5/8 DW. Then put two 4x4 sheets together with about 8 screws, then put two 4x4 sheets together with the same number of screws and GG. Wait 30 days hang each from something and hit with a rubber mallet.


GG on the edge of a stud is a waste of perfectly good GG. Do some online research on Constrained Dampening Layers. That is the principle at work with GG.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24503941


....

GG on the edge of a stud is a waste of perfectly good GG. Do some online research on Constrained Dampening Layers. That is the principle at work with GG.

That's why I asked BIGmouth. Now I know. What I'm faced with is a room with two exterior walls, 2 rather large windows and will also have double french doors(not glass), but as heavy as I can find within a reasonable amount of $. I'm also planning on insulation between the floor joists and a drop, acoustical tile ceiling. So, I already know that I have 3 weak links in the isolation chain. That's why I know I can't obtain 100% isolation and soundproofing. But despite these items, I still want my room as quiet as possible and to keep any internal vibrations absorbed and kept to a minimum. I believe I can take certain design measures that will help. Outside noises are not my primary concern as much as achieving a deaden, damped room. I could go all out with better, more current windows designed with sound-proofing in mind, and fireproof doors, & drywall the ceiling, but that's not my overall intent. And more costly than my budget allows. I will not be watching movies or listening to music at reference levels. This is my multi-purpose mancave.


What I have decided to do is install double 5/8" drywall on all walls with Roxul Safe-n-Sound throughout. The 'primary' wall where the front speakers and 2 subs will be, is a 6" wall with alternating studs on 16" centers. This wall will have insulation woven horizontally between the alternating studs. It will have 5/8" DDW on front and back. The other interior wall is 4", as are the two exterior walls. So, given some of the constraints I'm dealing with, the design decisions I've made, I'm not sure that GG would benefit me at all. My fishtank has a big hole - the french doors. But, I have not purchased them yet, and they would be 'upgradeable' in the future should I desire a step-up in isolation. The drop ceiling is not a concern either, as I'm under a room that is little used and has a large area rug. I know the studs are what will carry the sound, but short of using hat-channel and clips to hang the dryway, damping it as best I can from the inside is my only 'reasonable' option.


I'm open to ideas and whether or not GG would give me any significant amount of additional isolation.


Rick
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by redjr  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24503684


Have the lab boys at GG constructed two identical rooms, with the ONLY altering difference being the GG?

Well, the lab did test the wall assemblies - which should get you the same basic results:

http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/lab-tests/green-glue-transmission-loss-testing/


A wall with DD+GG (on the source side only) gets you an STC rating of 52. Same wall (DD) without GG is rated at STC of 42... See the first test listed (OL 05-0414) and the same construction without GG (OL 05-1058). Unfortunately the latter report isn't available to look at, only the results...


And the simple "knock test" will tell you it works and was worth the money.


EDIT: Although now seeing your room particulars, I don't think you'll get much benefit, since the french doors and drop-ceiling provide gaping escape paths for any sound. But you could save some money by skipping the Roxul and just using the pink fluffy stuff.


Jeff
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by redjr  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24504177



I'm open to ideas and whether or not GG would give me any significant amount of additional isolation.

I do think it has effect, at least in parts of the spectrum, but what I think is unimportant.


Will you tear down and try again if the resulting soundproofing isn't enough. Or do you know you can live with that result without beating yourself up over not trying the gg?


If either answer is yes, them I guess you can skip it. If your honest answers to both is no, then DO go for it.
 

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Our theater is upstairs above master and next to daughters room. I used mass loaded vinyl on floor plus green glue. Walls are two layers of 1/2" drywall with green glue and insulated walls. We are about two months after completion and with 85 db in theater my daughters room is about 43 db. For me it is worth being able to use it without going into night mode. Downstairs in master is quiet just a little bass sound. I haven't taken a reading down there yet. Question is the extra time and money worth it? For me it was.
 

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I'd prefer to put something between the sheets if for no other reason but a bond between them. But, in my particular situation, I have no illusions that it's going to greatly influence the isolation characteristics of my space. They DD will have the most influence. The carpeted floor won't hurt either.
As for my french doors... I haven't found any yet, but plan on visiting a custom door store in my area within the next week, or so. I guess you could take some regular solid panels door and customize the inside surface with sound absorption panels, but I don't know how that would work out aesthetically. No one will be seeing the inside of the doors too much. Has anyone done anything similarly?


Rick
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightlord  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24504227


I do think it has effect, at least in parts of the spectrum, but what I think is unimportant.


Will you tear down and try again if the resulting soundproofing isn't enough. Absolutely not! Or do you know you can live with that result without beating yourself up over not trying the gg? Yes.


If either answer is yes, them I guess you can skip it. If your honest answers to both is no, then DO go for it.
But, I still don't think I will skip it - totally. I may put on half of the recommended amount just as a bonding agent.
 

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I did a complete sound proof envelope on the second floor with all of my wiring HVAC and anything else entering the room in my soffits, stage, and riser. My can lights are in my coffers and sconces on the columns. The largest gap is the 36” wide 1 3/4" solid door. 3 walls were exterior and I used clips and channel the rear wall toward the billiard room is double stud wall. I have 5/8" OSB/ GG /5/8" DW in the theater and double 5/8" DW in billiard room.. I have a second layer of ¾” T&G OSB with GG on the floor. My walls have R13 except in rear where both decoupled walls have R13. My ceiling has R19. That said I do have a comparison my friend’s theater is also over his garage with no sound proofing and you can not only hear his base but the vocals and music all over his house. In my house you can barely hear anything when standing in the billiard room except the low rumble of base but like someone said distant thunder. And that is playing at reference level.
Quote:
Originally Posted by redjr  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24504177


a room with two exterior walls,
clips and DW/GG/DW

2 rather large windows
check my window plug build

will also have double french doors(not glass), but as heavy as I can find within a reasonable amount of $.
My gapping hole for sound loss is the door I would reconsider French doors

I'm also planning on insulation between the floor joists
R19 and do not forget to use backer boxes for the caned lights or any light fixture

drop, acoustical tile ceiling.
Just my opinion but if you do not put clips and channel with DW/GG/DW do not even do anything else as all the sound will be going through here

I will not be watching movies or listening to music at reference levels. This is my multi-purpose mancave.
you say that now


What I have decided to do is install double 5/8" drywall on all walls with Roxul Safe-n-Sound throughout. The 'primary' wall where the front speakers and 2 subs will be, is a 6" wall with alternating studs on 16" centers. This wall will have insulation woven horizontally between the alternating studs. It will have 5/8" DDW on front and back. The other interior wall is 4", as are the two exterior walls. So, given some of the constraints I'm dealing with, the design decisions I've made, I'm not sure that GG would benefit me at all. My fishtank has a big hole - the french doors. bigger hole is the dropped ceiling But, I have not purchased them yet, and they would be 'upgradeable' in the future should I desire a step-up in isolation. The drop ceiling is not a concern either, as I'm under a room that is little used and has a large area rug. sound will flank through this room to the rest of the house like my buddies place I know the studs are what will carry the sound, but short of using hat-channel and clips to hang the dryway, damping it as best I can from the inside is my only 'reasonable' option.


I'm open to ideas and whether or not GG would give me any significant amount of additional isolation.
do not bother if you are not doing the ceiling. Just my opinion

Rick
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24504187


Although now seeing your room particulars, I don't think you'll get much benefit, since the french doors and drop-ceiling provide gaping escape paths for any sound. But you could save some money by skipping the Roxul and just using the pink fluffy stuff.
what he said

Jeff
Quote:
Originally Posted by redjr  /t/788718/green-glue-did-it-work#post_24505715


But, I still don't think I will skip it - totally. I may put on half of the recommended amount just as a bonding agent
You can always do the DW/GG/DW on the ceiling later if the effect is not how you like. but do not be one of the people who do a half job then go online and bad mouth a product. Not saying that is you but it happens all the time


You read a lot of all or nothing comments and I cannot tell you what a half job will do since I went full steam ahead. But I can say a well planed completely thought out sound proof room with the lessons learned here and elsewhere will do an outstanding job. So yes GG does work as advertised if employed properly.
 

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My room has 3 layers - one layer of OSB, and 2 layers of 5/8 drywall with GG between each layer. I also built a infinite baffle subwoofer (small room behind the theater) with 4 18" subwoofers using the same triple layer combination. I also made sure to follow all other soundproofing techniques like room within a room, very minimal penetrations to the drywall etc. While it does not completely damp all of the low frequencies, it does an effective enough job, that I can watch a movie late at night at pretty outrageous levels without worrying about waking the kids.


The biggest advantage is the very quiet room. You can hear every detail from the quietest whisper to the loudest explosions without having to mess with the volume control constantly. Even without being able to compare with Green Glue and Without. If I hadn't used it, I would always wonder.


I also agree with the comments here about doing it all or not at all. One mistake can easily defeat your other efforts. Your room is going to be as good as its weakest link.
 
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