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Is there any measurable performance for green glue used only on a single layer of drywall on the studs?


I'm planning on doing a double layer for the HT with the GG sandwich, but I'm wondering if I should order an extra case for the other rooms where I'm going to have a single layer. One of the other rooms is going to be a billiards room, so it might get a little loud in there, but not much low bass.
 

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Donno about Green Glue on studs only, but a similar idea is to use Integrity Gasket between the studs and the drywall.


Several of the other members have had a lot of success by using IG, so you may want to check out some of their threads.

-cuff
 

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As I understand green glue, it works when applied between to flat sheets to absorb energy and dampen the flexing of the flat surface (wall panel). Per their website it does not work on a single sheet as a coating. Don't know the benefit/cost analysis for application to the stud surface for single sheet.


Allen
 

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An idea comes to mind that might make your idea a bit better... However, the extra cost of wood might just make the idea moot...


One of the items already mentioned is that you want to minimize the flex of the drywall and add as much surface area for the green glue and drywall (even in the single layer).


You already have vertical studs every 18 on center (I suppose). Now, take long 1 inch stock (I would use 6 inch width) and run stringers every 12 inches on center HORRIZONTALLY. Now you have nearly 50% coverage for the green glue and have minimized the flexing of the single layer. My hunch is that the added cost of wood might be a wash with simply doubling up on the layers though.


Just an idea. :D
 

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The thing about treatment on the studs only is that you will always and forever still have all those screws connecting the drywall to the studs, and you won't change the properties of the drywall layer. Perhaps you've heard of the problem of short-circuiting resilient channel? Get a screw or two through the channel to a stud and the gains dissappear? well now imagine that with 200 screws through the channel.


All it can provide is (maybe, depending on what the treatment is) a little bit of damping and some improvement (a few dB) in mid/high frequency isolation.


That said, it's very cheap, so perhaps an argument could be made for GG or IG or something on the studs being better than nothing, but you shouldn't get your hopes too high.



Green Glue massively modifies the resonant behavior of the wall, and also creates a situation (when used between layers) where energy doesn't transfer across the wall, resulting in an overhaul of wall performance. adding 1 layer of GG and 1 layer of drywall should improve wall performance ~10dB on full-band theater noise. 2 layers of GG and 2 layers of drywall should improve performance ~15dB. This is all verified with 3rd party tests, and i refer to the entire relevant bandwidth.


Adding resilient channel and staying at 2 total drywall layers (1 each side) should result in ~3-4dB of improvement, adding resilient channel and double drywlal to both sides should result in ~8-9dB of improvement, perhaps. (give or take)


Adding RSIC clips and double drywall to both sides would result in notably larger improvements than resilient channel. See, the RSIC clips change the behavior of the wall, and provide lovely mechanical decoupling, resulting in a completely different wall.


I haven't a clue what MLV would do for a wall, none of the MLV peddlers shares their data with the public, and i've never seen any.


Adding a 3rd layer of drywall (going to double drywall one side) would add about 3dB of performance, and going to double drywall on both sides would add about 5dB.


Adding IG or GG to the studs alone would not be likely to yield more than 0-3dB net full-band gain if compared in a lab test (the basis for all the comments above).
 
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