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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My antenna is connected to a Research Communications 9262 preamp, coax enters the house through a roof vent near the peak of the roof. Continues into the attic, down an interior wall to the basement where it plugs into a PSU 9255 Power unit that uses a grounded plug. Do I need to further ground this setup?


If Yes, Do I run a ground wire from the peak of the roof, down the roof, down the siding and into the ground? I REALLY do not want to reroute the coax down the roof down the siding, into the house, through the ceiling.....
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kstyv /forum/post/18173922


My antenna ...coax enters the house through a roof vent near the peak of the roof. Continues into the attic, down an interior wall to the basement where it plugs into a ... grounded plug. Do I need to further ground this setup?


If Yes, Do I run a ground wire from the peak of the roof, down the roof, down the siding and into the ground? I REALLY do not want to reroute the coax down the roof down the siding, into the house, through the ceiling.....

You must ground the mast, and the coax outer conductor, to comply with the electrical code sections 810 and 820. The ground plug on the amplifier power cord does not satisfy either of those requirements.


If you do not bother to ground your system in accordance with the code, you will not be alone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ya, neither inspector (Ours nor mortgage company's) noticed it considering we were able to purchase the house like this.


But I would like to make it correct and not risk killing this expensive preamp and equip down line. Can I leave the coax entering the roof vent and run the ground over the roof or do I need to run the coax over the roof and down before attaching to the grounding block?
 

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You connect a 10 gauge copper, 8 gauge aluminum or 17 gauge copper coated steel wire to the antenna mast, and have it follow the path of the coax to where it enters the building through the vent. You then cut the coax there and insert a ground block with two ground wire holes in it. You put the ground wire from the antenna mast in one, and then you use 10 gauge copper to go from the ground block as expediently as possible to your "ground electrode system". I am always satisfied grounding to a cold water pipe. The code prohibited that starting in 2002, but only because of the concern that at some point in the future, someone doing a plumbing repair might repair your water pipe by inserting a plastic section in it. As long as you are sure the cold water pipe is ground and intact, it will serve the purpose that a ground is supposed to serve.


On the other hand, if there is a conforming ground system connection point in your attic, the code does NOT require that the connection be made outside. You could connect to that, but most homes do not have a ground electrode system connection point in their attics.
 

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The code requires electrical grounds to be made within 5-10' of entering the structure.


The cold water pipe ground was devised because many multi-dwelling units (within the cities - ie. Baltimore, NYC, etc.) do not have exterior ground rods and the city water system (Black Iron Pipe) was considered an appropriate electrical ground. As stated above, plastic pipe has come into use and there is no longer a guarantee that there is a continuous electrical path to the common electrical ground.
 

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Cold water pipe grounding is against codes in some areas. Best bet is to always ground or bond to the main building electrical ground.
 
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