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I can't see how grounding your antenna should have anything to do with this at all. Without seeing your Rabbitears report we have no idea how strong your stations actually are. Having said all that, it's common for lightning to cause dropouts as the RF generated by lightning can easily be stronger than your stations. The lower the frequency the worse the problem. High VHF is worse than UHF and low VHF is worst than high VHF.

None of my stations are very strong and my one high VHF station is easily disrupted by lightning up to 100 miles away if it's in the same direction as the station. UHF is not quite so sensitive.
Thanks for the response, Cal. Here's my report and current set up:
https://www.rabbitears.info/searchmap.php?request=result&study_id=116958

My "run" goes like this: Danny Hodges "Ultimate" Antenna, 6 ft cable run to Antenna's Direct UHF/VHF combiner; Stellar Labs VHF 2476 6 ft run to the same combiner; 3 ft cable run from combiner to kitz500preamp.

15 ft run from kitz preamp to grounding block; 20 ft run from grounding block into kitz power adapter.

Despite the scary-looking report, I pick up WBRE and WYOU (11 and 12) fairly strongly off of the Stellar Labs. My Tivo signal strength is typically 67-72.

With the Ultimate Antenna, I pick up WNEP/WVIA RF 21 and WOLF RF 22 from Scranton off the back. Signal strength is 42-55 depending on the atmosphere. These are the two I see some picture breakups introduced.

My Altoona-Johnstown stations to the southwest I pick up fine with signal strength of 47 for WPSU RF15 and 60-67 for WJAC RF 26, WATM RF 31 and WTAJ RF 24. However I still some picture breakups on RF 26 during storms.
 

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15 ft run from kitz preamp to grounding block; 20 ft run from grounding block into kitz power adapter.

Despite the scary-looking report, I pick up WBRE and WYOU (11 and 12) fairly strongly off of the Stellar Labs. My Tivo signal strength is typically 67-72.

Do you know for sure that your "Signal Strength" meter is actually a Signal Strength meter? If you have just one meter and it's on your TV then it's most likely a Signal Quality (SNR) meter. This tells you little about the actual signal strength.

With your report it's no surprise you get dropouts during thunderstorms. I'd say that's completely normal. UHF is not immune from lightning interference.

FYI, the KT-500 has far more gain than you need for your short coax run. More gain does not equal more stations. Since all your stations are weak, you're getting away with it. The KT-500 would be good for weak stations and a 200-300 foot run of RG-6. The KT-501 set to max gain would be a good match for your setup. Don't set the KT-500 gain to minimum because the noise figure gets bad.
 

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Do you know for sure that your "Signal Strength" meter is actually a Signal Strength meter? If you have just one meter and it's on your TV then it's most likely a Signal Quality (SNR) meter. This tells you little about the actual signal strength.

With your report it's no surprise you get dropouts during thunderstorms. I'd say that's completely normal. UHF is not immune from lightning interference.

FYI, the KT-500 has far more gain than you need for your short coax run. More gain does not equal more stations. Since all your stations are weak, you're getting away with it. The KT-500 would be good for weak stations and a 200-300 foot run of RG-6. The KT-501 set to max gain would be a good match for your setup. Don't set the KT-500 gain to minimum because the noise figure gets bad.
I appreciate your help with this, Calaveras. I previously had a cm7777 (old style) so I wanted something almost as powerful. I have used the variable gain setting of the kt-500 to find the best option and I'd guesstimate I have it set about 20-22 db.

I guess I won't worry about trying to change anything then if the issues are normal during thunderstorms.
 

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I'm about to install an antenna, but I have a question about grounding. Currently, my cable TV line is grounded to a copper water pipe in the basement. From what I understand, that used to be acceptable, but now it's not according to the NEC.

The antenna is going to be on the opposite side of the house, near the electrical service meter and house ground. I plan on grounding the mast there, since it's close-by. However, my question is about the antenna line. Would I be able to ground the antenna coaxial line using the basement ground, or should I ground it to the house ground since the mast will be grounded there? In either case, would I be able to ground both the antenna line and cable line to the same copper wire, or should they be on separate lines?

Thank you for any advice and help received, and if you need me to elaborate further just ask!
 

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Can the 10 gauge ground wire for the mast ground run along side the coaxial RG6 cable as they are both going toward the same place on the house? (Grounding rod). The coax enters the house just above the ground rod location. Do they have to be separated from each other? Can they both be in the same mounting clamps along the run? Thanks
 

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Can the 10 gauge ground wire for the mast ground run along side the coaxial RG6 cable as they are both going toward the same place on the house? (Grounding rod). The coax enters the house just above the ground rod location. Do they have to be separated from each other? Can they both be in the same mounting clamps along the run? Thanks


I'm not a code expert, but I think that would be OK as long as the metal of the 10 gauge wire from the mast doesn't make contact with the coax shield at any point. The intent of the code is that they are to be electrically isolated from each other until they reach the house electrical system ground.

As always, the NEC is only a suggestion. The local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction), who is usually the electrical inspector, has the final say. His interpretation of the code becomes the local law that is binding on you and the local electricians.
 

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What would be the most practical and cost effective way to ground an antenna/ mast that is about 50 feet away from the house in the backyard?
A tower or mast away from the house should have its own ground, but the NEC says that a separate ground rod must be bonded to the house ground with 6 gauge copper wire (expensive).

You will have to treat your system the way hams do their towers.

This document might help:
Antenna System Bonding and Grounding Requirements in the USA
by Whitham D. Reeve
http://www.reeve.com/Documents/Articles Papers/Reeve_AntennaSystemGroundingRequirements.pdf
 

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Joining coaxial feeds from two antennas thru exterior combiner. Bonding to electric ground (coax-ground.png)

Same as using commonly purchased (coax-ground1.png)?

Thank you in advance!

- ughAudio
Welcome to the forum.

Yes, that is equivalent, but you will also need a separate 10 gauge copper conductor for the mast.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Yes, that is equivalent, but you will also need a separate 10 gauge copper conductor for the mast.
THANK YOU for your rapid answer, rabbit73. As well for the additional alert regarding the mast, and I've learned a lot from the forum - AND you! - over the last year or so: got #8 ready to go already!
 

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I'm trying to figure out if I need a ground rod or not for my setup. I am planning on installing a 10' mast with a wifi antenna connected on my roof to my chimney. If my electric panel is grounded to my copper water line, do I still need a ground rod? As per NEC, if I do use a ground rod I'll need to bond it to my electrical panel which becomes complex since I'll have to open it up to connect the 6AWG to the panels ground.
 

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I'm trying to figure out if I need a ground rod or not for my setup. I am planning on installing a 10' mast with a wifi antenna connected on my roof to my chimney. If my electric panel is grounded to my copper water line, do I still need a ground rod? As per NEC, if I do use a ground rod I'll need to bond it to my electrical panel which becomes complex since I'll have to open it up to connect the 6AWG to the panels ground.
If the house electrical system uses the copper water line for the house electrical system ground, I see no reason why your antenna system can't use the same ground. However, you will need two 10 gauge wires from your antenna system to the house ground, one for the mast and one for the coax shield from a grounding block (AKA as an ADU).

As always, the NEC is only a suggestion. Your local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction), who is usually the electrical inspector, has the final say. His interpretation of the code becomes the local law that is binding on you and the local electricians.
 

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If the house electrical system uses the copper water line for the house electrical system ground, I see no reason why your antenna system can't use the same ground. However, you will need two 10 gauge wires from your antenna system to the house ground, one for the mast and one for the coax shield from a grounding block (AKA as an ADU).

As always, the NEC is only a suggestion. Your local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction), who is usually the electrical inspector, has the final say. His interpretation of the code becomes the local law that is binding on you and the local electricians.
Why can't i just use one 10awg wire for both the antenna and mast? I was planning on wiring a 10awg to the lightning arrestor -> ground clamp on antenna mast -> ground strap on electric panel mast
 

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Why can't i just use one 10awg wire for both the antenna and mast? I was planning on wiring a 10awg to the lightning arrestor -> ground clamp on antenna mast -> ground strap on electric panel mast
You CAN do that if you want to, but it doesn't conform to the NEC code. I have no knowledge of the Canadian code.

If the antenna is outside, the coax shield should be grounded with a grounding block that is connected to the house electrical system ground with 10 gauge copper wire for electrical safety and to reject interference. For further compliance with the electrical code (NEC), the mast should also be grounded in a similar manner to drain any buildup of static charge which will tend to discourage a strike, but the system will not survive a direct strike.

NEC Grounding_1.jpg


There are two separate grounding conductors to satisfy two separate requirements. The grounding conductor for the mast is to drain any buildup of static charge to reduce the chance of a strike. The grounding conductor for the coax shield is to protect you from electrical shock.

The coax is usually connected to AC operated equipment. All AC operated equipment has leakage current, even when operating properly. If there is a malfunction in the AC operated equipment, there might be AC voltage on the coax shield which could shock you.

I have had 3 close calls with electrical shock, so I bought a Leakage Current tester to check my equipment.

Simpson229rev2.jpg


When I had a lot of equipment connected together for testing, I received a mild shock. The leakage currents from all the pieces of equipment were added together. When I grounded the equipment coax shields, I no longer felt a shock because the leakage current was diverted to ground instead of going through my body.

TunerTest4.jpg


Example:
Leakage current posts on DHC
Getting A/C voltage on converter box's antenna input !
ATSC Converter Boxes (Non-HD, Non-Recording)

Equipment Leakage Current
ATSC Converter Boxes (Non-HD, Non-Recording)
 

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question about running ground wire over roof shingles?

thinking about maybe moving antenna to chimney mount, so the ground wire will be running over a flat roof for bout 15 ft, before attaching directly straihgt to bonded service conduit.

are standoffs like pictured required (still have a few of these from old twinlead from the 60's around) or can it be secured to shingles with just some screwin coaxial clips?

thank you in advance,
- ughaudio

3136531
 

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question about running ground wire over roof shingles?

are standoffs like pictured required (still have a few of these from old twinlead from the 60's around) or can it be secured to shingles with just some screwin coaxial clips?
I see your question, but I don't have a good answer at this time. I would be worried about making holes in the roof because of possible leaks. I seem to remember a device that you can slip under a shingle and fasten so that the shingle above it covers the fastener just as it covers the roofing nails that hold the shingles. Maybe fastening the 10 gauge wire at the chimney and at the edge of the roof would be sufficient.
 

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I see your question, but I don't have a good answer at this time. I would be worried about making holes in the roof because of possible leaks. I seem to remember a device that you can slip under a shingle and fasten so that the shingle above it covers the fastener just as it covers the roofing nails that hold the shingles. Maybe fastening the 10 gauge wire at the chimney and at the edge of the roof would be sufficient.
Thank you for this quick reply, rabbit73!

Not worried about water and appreciative of your LEAK observation: drilled holes several years ago with lag bolts and with a heavy dose of henrys wet patch through the holes and under the shingles on some other project and still looking good in the attic.

Nonetheless, if I remount I will follow your advice (chimney AND roof edge)!
 
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