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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sicilianbambino</strong> <a href="/forum/post/19520527"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What about running VMware and running windows 7 on the same box?<br><br>
Feasible?</div>
</div>
<br>
We Got Served ran an extensive article this summer, <a href="http://www.wegotserved.com/2010/06/28/transform-windows-home-server-vail-windows-media-center/" target="_blank">here</a>, about trying to configure a Vail/Windows 7/VMWare setup to run as a server and front end all in one. IMHO, it looks pretty complicated. Definitely not designed to do both.
 

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Don't want to get OT here, but if anyone is using WHS MS has just announced that with the release of version 2 (Vail) they will be removing Drive Extender (responsible for JBOD and duplication). Not a good thing, I started a topic here to discuss further:<br><br><a href="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1292340" target="_blank">http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1292340</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>chidave</strong> <a href="/forum/post/19522705"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hi all<br><br>
I just built a htpc using the<br><br>
gigabyte ep43-ud3l ( rev 1,1) motherboard<br><br><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128380&Tpk=ep43-ud3l" target="_blank">http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...&Tpk=ep43-ud3l</a><br><br>
which has Onboard Audio Realtek ALC888 8 Channels<br><br>
now when I run the sound check I get 5.1 audio from all speakers so I know it works BUT when I watch anything on the web I only get stereo. I don't know anything about this area so any help would be great.<br><br>
Secondly I am planning on retiring my Denon 2500 after 13 years of service and want to keep my trusty NHT superzero speakers, is there a Pc AVR card I can just hook up to the speakers.<br><br>
thanks in advance for any help or guidance.<br><br>
dave</div>
</div>
<br>
Dollars to donuts your source is only providing 2 channel audio. What are you viewing/listening to from the web? Hulu *may* offer some surround video but I would guess only with the pay service. Most YouTube and other videos are probably just stereo.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="7" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>dbone1026</strong> <a href="showthread.php?s=426af42ba69004997d6f69d8ea0f41fe&p=19534343#post19534343"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="http://images.avsforum.com/avs-/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Don't want to get OT here, but if anyone is using WHS MS has just announced that with the release of version 2 (Vail) they will be removing Drive Extender (responsible for JBOD and duplication). Not a good thing, I started a topic here to discuss further:<br><br><a href="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...3#post19534283" target="_blank">http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...3#post19534283</a></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
This link is not working <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/images/smilies/eek.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!">.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="7" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>HTPCat</strong> <a href="showthread.php?s=426af42ba69004997d6f69d8ea0f41fe&p=19540150#post19540150"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="http://images.avsforum.com/avs-/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This link is not working <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/images/smilies/eek.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!">.</div>
</td>
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Argh...AVS copied over the abbreviated link:<br><br><a href="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1292340" target="_blank">http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1292340</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>wickchucker</strong> <a href="/forum/post/19532161"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
We Got Served ran an extensive article this summer, <a href="http://www.wegotserved.com/2010/06/28/transform-windows-home-server-vail-windows-media-center/" target="_blank">here</a>, about trying to configure a Vail/Windows 7/VMWare setup to run as a server and front end all in one. IMHO, it looks pretty complicated. Definitely not designed to do both.</div>
</div>
<br>
It appeared so complicated because the poster was trying to do it backwards - running Windows 7 inside the VM is a none-starter when you need access directly to the hardware for hardware-accelerated HD video playback, TV Tuner support etc. etc.<br><br>
As I and many other posters pointed out in the comments, the correct way to go about this is to run Windows 7 as the host OS, and the WHS inside the VM. This method is known to work just fine - and the beauty of WHS inside a VM means than whenever you outgrow the hardware (ie, run out of storage !) it's trivial just to migrate the whole installation onto a different machine.<br><br>
Be sure to reserve seperate physical disks for the Host Windows 7 and the VM WHS - don't use hard disk files.
 

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HTPC<br>
$99.99 - Intel Core i3-530 Clarkdale 2.93GHz 4MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 73W Dual-Core Desktop Processor BX80616I3530<br>
$89.99 - ASRock H55M Pro LGA 1156 Intel H55 HDMI Micro ATX Intel Motherboard<br>
$64.99 - G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ<br>
$85.00 - Plextor PX-64M1S 2.5" 64GB SATA II Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) - OS Drive<br>
$139.98 (69.99 a piece) - Seagate Barracuda LP ST32000542AS 2TB 5900 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard - Drive -Bare Drive x2 for DATA<br>
$79.99 - OCZ ModXStream Pro OCZ700MXSP 700W ATX12V V2.2 / EPS12V SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply compatible with core i7<br>
$79.99 - LG WH10LS30K 10X Blu-ray Burner - LightScribe Support - Bulk - OEM<br>
Total $639.93<br><br>
With some extra's<br>
$107.21 - Gyration GYR4101US Black 88-key Normal Keys 15 hot keys Function Keys 2.4GHz RF Wireless Mini Air Music Remote w/ MotionSense & Compact Keyboard<br>
$185.00 - Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR High Definition Personal Video Recorder<br>
$32.99 - D-Link DGS-2208 10/100/1000Mbps 8-Port Desktop Green Ethernet Switch 8 x RJ45 8K MAC Address Table 144KB per Device Packet Buffer Memory Buffer Memory<br><br><br>
Grand Total $965.13<br><br>
Everything from new egg accept the HD PVR (Amazon), I had some Gift Certificates I had to use up.
 

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I'm seriously considering replacing my Tivo for an HTPC. Ideally I would like something around the same size and as quiet at the Tivo. I would be running Window Media Center as my front end. I currently have Comcast as a cable TV provider but I'm seriously considering switching over to an OTA solution. What do you guys recommend hardware wise to get this accomplished. Considering that this would be replacing my Tivo, recording TV is a top priority.
 

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I'm fixing to build a the 20hd version from the June edition and the processor in it is currently unavailable from newegg, does anyone have a suggestion for another?<br><br>
I was currently looking at the Athlon 2 x4 but thought it might be overkill.
 

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<span style="font-size:200%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Buyer's Guide to Building a Home Theater PC - October/November 2011</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span style="font-size:150%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>Announcement</b></span></span> (updated on October 1, 2011)<br><br>
Here is the basic plan for "Buyer's Guide to Building a Home Theater PC" (formerly "Recommended HTPC Systems"):<br><blockquote></blockquote><span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>1. Issues and Editions.</b></span> The guide will be issued <b>every month</b>, on around the <b>20th day</b> of the month, in the <b>PDF</b> format (a PDF reader is required to read it, such as Adobe Reader [<a href="http://get.adobe.com/reader/" target="_blank">free download</a>] or Adobe Acrobat).<br><br><span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>2. Asking a Donation!</b></span> I am asking a donation for the latest issue (<a href="#user_Why%20do%20I%20ask%20a%20donation?">why</a>). There are two choices:<br><ul><li><b>Single issue ($4 USD or more)</b>: You can download the current latest issue.<br><br></li>
<li><b>4 issues ($10 USD or more)</b>: You are eligible to download 4 consecutive issues. For example if you send a donation on April 1st, you can download March (during 4/1-4/20), April (during 4/20-5/20), May (during 5/20-6/20) and June (during 6/20-7/13) issues. <b>How this works</b>: Each donator will be provided with a download link to the issue file, which is valid for 2500 hours = 104 days = 3 months and 2 weeks (for example, April 1 to July 13 if you donate on April 1). I will update the file in the server on around the 20th day of each month and will announce it in this thread. Then you can download the new issue at the link provided. You will use the link repeatedly during the subscription period. So <b>please keep the download link</b>.</li>
</ul>
At this time only a donation by PayPal is accepted. Click the button<br><blockquote></blockquote><a href="http://www.e-junkie.com/renethx" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/PayPalDonate.png" style="border:0px solid;"></a>
then select either one described above, click the PayPal icon and follow the instruction in the loaded page to send a donation. If you don't have a PayPal account, don't worry, click the link "Continue" following "Don't have a PayPal account?" in the page to create an account (it's free) and send money using your credit card or bank account. You will receive a download link instantly. Note that<br><ul><li><b>The price field is editable; please change it and donate as much as you can</b>. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smilie"><br><br></li>
<li>Please <b>add your User Name</b> at AVS Forum in "Add special instructions to merchant" <b>if</b> you want to get my support via PM or posts in the thread. Otherwise I can't identify you with an AVS Forum member unless your user name is the same as your PayPal account holder name.</li>
</ul><br><span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>3. Older Issues will be released free.</b></span> Older issues will be released for free, either in this thread like the previous "Recommended Systems" or in PDF for download or both. I am planning on releasing a couple of months old issue every couple of months.<br><br><span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>4. Have a Question?</b></span> If you have a question (how to build, how to configure or whatever), please either post it in the thread (yes, please post any question in the thread, hoping that invoke interest in the latest guide <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smilie">), PM me or email me. I will try to answer it; if I can't, somebody else may be able to help you.
<a><b>Why do I ask a donation?</b></a> Maintaining the guide consists of<br><ul><li>Research latest hardware components;</li>
<li>Acquire key hardware components and do lots of experiments;</li>
<li>Write the information obtained in a readable form, that requires lots of time, meditation and inspiration (not kidding).</li>
</ul>
Among them the most difficult part is the second part because it involves lots of money ($1000 or more per month, not kidding, I consider $1000 is the minimum amount to maintain and keep the guide up to date) and currently it relies heavily on the donations. So please consider making a donation, as much as you can afford, if you think the guide is helpful and want to see it updated for some time to come.<br><br>
BTW the amount of donations in 2010 is<br><ul><li>October 16 2010 - November 15 2010: $60</li>
<li>September 16 2010 - October 15 2010: $85</li>
<li>August 16 2010 - September 15 2010: $145</li>
</ul>
This is good enough to buy a motherboard per month, but nothing more. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/images/smilies/frown.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Frown"> This guide is going to die sooner or later if this continues.<br><br><span style="font-size:150%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>Release Notes</b></span></span><br><ul><li><b>October/November 2011 Issue</b>: Released on December 11, 2011.<br><br>
- <b>Sandy Bridge-E LGA 2011</b> systems took the place of 3-year-old Bloomfield LGA 1366 systems.<br>
- All systems were reexamined and nearly half of the systems were updated or completely changed because of new hardware components and price change of many components.<br><br><b>Sample (21 pages)</b>:<br><blockquote></blockquote><a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/142908158/ee4b39b/Sample_Buyers_Guide_HTPC_11-10.pdf.html" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Cover_Buyers_Guide_HTPC_11-10.png" style="border:0px solid;"></a>
</li>
<li><b>August/September 2011 Issue</b>: Released on October 1, 2011.<br><br>
- The low-end and mid-range systems are restructured.<br>
- Nearly half of the systems were updated or completely changed because of new hardware components and price change of many components.<br><br></li>
<li><b>June/July 2011 Issue</b>: Released on July 14, 2011. The June issue has been delayed because of the delay of the May issue. So I decided to combine the June and July issues.<br><br>
- <b>AMD A-Series APU (Llano)</b> systems took place of all the Socket AM3 systems in the low-end and mid-range AMD systems.<br>
- Nearly half of the systems were updated because of new hardware components (new <b>AMD 990FX/990X/SB950 chipset</b> motherboards, new X58/ICH10R chipset motherboards etc.) and price change of many components.<br><br></li>
<li><b>May 2011 Issue</b>: Released on June 3, 2011.<br><br>
- All LGA 775 systems were replaced by LGA 1155 systems finally.<br>
- Intel <b>Z68</b> chipset motherboards are used in place of P67 in many systems.<br>
- Standard Mini-ITX and Budget/Low-End microATX/ATX systems were completely re-organized reflecting the recent release of <b>Pentium <i>Sandy Bridge</i> processor</b>.<br>
- 15-bay server systems are now using an Intel processor and Intel-brand motherboard (one reason for that is Intel Gb LAN).<br>
- 20-24 bay server systems have more processor/motherboard options.<br><br></li>
<li><b>April 2011 Issue (<a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/137256161/f54976b/Buyers_Guide_HTPC_11-4.pdf.html" target="_blank">free download</a>)</b>: Released on April 23, 2011.<br><br>
- All Radeon HD 5xxx cards were replaced by the latest Radeon HD 6xxx.<br>
- Several older motherboards and SSDs were replaced by new ones.<br>
- A Xeon LGA 1155 workstation was added.<br>
- Server systems were streamlined and divided into two categories: Server I (12 and 15-drive systems) and Server II (20 and 24-drive systems).<br><br></li>
<li><b>March 2011 Issue (<a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/124106065/6376eaa/Buyers_Guide_HTPC_11-3.pdf.html" target="_blank">free download</a>)</b>: Released on March 21, 2011.<br><br>
- Every Intel LGA 1156 (Clarkdale and Lynnfield) system was replaced by a LGA 1155 (Sandy Bridge) system.<br>
- "Intel for 3D" (Clarkdale + a discrete graphics) systems were removed because Sandy Bridge supports 3D.<br>
- A LGA 1366 workstation was added.<br>
- Rocket 620 SATA controller card in a couple of server systems was replaced by Rosewill RC-211 because Rocket 620 BIOS disables other controller's BIOS.<br><br></li>
<li><b>February 2011 Issue (<a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/124106035/e4e214b/Buyers_Guide_HTPC_11-2.pdf.html" target="_blank">free download</a>)</b>: The initial version released on February 23, 2011, the final version released on March 4, 2011.<br><br>
- An AMD E-350 APU system was added in the mini-ITX system ("Budge Mini-ITX System").<br>
- Intel High-End/Premium/Ultimate Systems and Workstation were all updated (i.e. Lynnfield systems were revived) because <a href="http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/sb/CS-032263.htm" target="_blank">Intel recalled Intel 6 Series chipsets</a>.<br>
- Minor changes in the server systems (new motherboards, a new SATA 6.0Gbps controller card) for better cost/performance.<br>
- Every single system was reviewed and components were replaced if necessary.<br><br></li>
<li><b>January 2011 Issue (<a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/124106007/3bd0c4e/Buyers_Guide_HTPC_11-1.pdf.html" target="_blank">free download</a>)</b>: Issued on January 20, 2011. As Intel <i>Sandy Bridge</i> quad-core processors were released on January 9, mainly Intel High-End/Premium/Ultimate Systems were updated.<br><br></li>
<li><b>December 2010 Issue (<a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/114152831/632e2bf/Buyers_Guide_HTPC_10.12.pdf.html" target="_blank">free download</a>)</b>: Issued on January 5, 2011. This is the first PDF version of the Buyer's Guide. 80 pages in US letter. Almost every section of the June 2010 issue was updated. <b>This issue is also posted <a href="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=19553212#Buyer's%20Guide%20to%20Building%20a%20Home%20Theater%20PC%20-%20December%202010" target="_blank">here</a></b>.</li>
</ul><br><span style="font-size:200%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Buyer's Guide to Building a Home Theater PC - December 2010</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>A PDF version is also available for <a href="http://hotfile.com/dl/114152831/632e2bf/Buyers_Guide_HTPC_10.12.pdf.html" target="_blank">free download</a></b>.<br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b>Table of Contents</b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><a href="#user_Introduction"><b>Introduction</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Organization%20of%20the%20Contents"><b>Organization of the Contents</b></a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Classification%20of%20HTPC%20Systems"><b>Classification of HTPC Systems</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Classification%20of%20HTPC%20Systems:%201.%20Form%20Factor">1. Form Factor</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Classification%20of%20HTPC%20Systems:%202.%20Performance%20and%20Cost">2. Performance and Cost</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Classification%20of%20HTPC%20Systems:%203.%20CPU-Chipset-GPU%20Manufacturers">3. CPU-Chipset-GPU Manufacturers</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Component%20Selection"><b>Component Selection</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Component%20Selection:%20CPU">CPU</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Component%20Selection:%20Chipset%20and%20Motherboard">Chipset and Motherboard</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Component%20Selection:%20Memory">Memory</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20Component%20Selection:%20Graphics%20and%20Sound%20Devices">Graphics and Sound Devices</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Introduction:%20My%20Pick%20of%20HTPC"><b>My Pick of HTPC</b></a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS"><b>Peripheral Components and OS</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Input%20Device"><b>Input Device</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Input%20Device:%20MCE%20Remote">MCE Remote</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Input%20Device:%20Universal%20Remote">Universal Remote</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Input%20Device:%20Keyboard%20and%20Mouse">Keyboard and Mouse</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Input%20Device:%20So%20what%20do%20you%20need?">So what do you need?</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Optical%20Disc%20Drive"><b>Optical Disc Drive</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Optical%20Disc%20Drive:%20BD%20Writer/Reader%20/%20DVD%20Writer/Reader">BD Writer/Reader / DVD Writer/Reader</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Optical%20Disc%20Drive:%20BD%20Writer/Reader%20/%20DVD%20Writer%20-%20Slim%20Type">BD Writer/Reader / DVD Writer - Slim Type</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Optical%20Disc%20Drive:%20DVD%20Writer">DVD Writer</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Optical%20Disc%20Drive:%20DVD%20Writer%20-%20Slim%20Type">DVD Writer - Slim Type</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20TV%20Tuner%20Card%20for%20ATSC/Cable"><b>TV Tuner Card for ATSC/Cable</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20TV%20Tuner%20Card%20for%20ATSC/Cable:%20Digital+Analog">Digital+Analog</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20TV%20Tuner%20Card%20for%20ATSC/Cable:%20Digital%20Only">Digital Only</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20TV%20Tuner%20Card%20for%20ATSC/Cable:%20Digital%20Cable%20Tuner%20Card">Digital Cable Tuner Card</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20TV%20Tuner%20Card%20for%20ATSC/Cable:%20HD%20Video%20Capturing">HD Video Capturing</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Sound%20Card"><b>Sound Card</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Sound%20Card:%20Analog">Analog</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20Sound%20Card:%20S/PDIF">S/PDIF</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Peripheral%20Components%20and%20OS:%20OS"><b>OS</b></a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System"><b>Mini-ITX System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20General%20Consideration"><b>General Consideration</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Price%20Range">Price Range</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Feature%20Comparison">Feature Comparison</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Mini-ITX%20Cases">Mini-ITX Cases</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Standard%20System"><b>Standard System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Standard%20System:%20Intel%20(iGPU)">Intel (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Standard%20System:%20AMD%20(iGPU)">AMD (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Standard%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Standard%20System:%20Intel%20for%203D">Intel for 3D</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20Gaming%20System"><b>Mid-Range Gaming System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20Gaming%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20Gaming%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20High-End%20Gaming%20System"><b>High-End Gaming System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20High-End%20Gaming%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Mini-ITX%20System:%20High-End%20Gaming%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System"><b>MicroATX System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration"><b>General Consideration</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Price%20Range">Price Range</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Feature%20Comparison">Feature Comparison</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20MicroATX%20Cases">MicroATX Cases</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Budget%20System"><b>Budget System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Budget%20System:%20Intel%20(iGPU)">Intel (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Budget%20System:%20AMD%20(iGPU)">AMD (iGPU)</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System"><b>Low-End System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20Intel%20(iGPU)">Intel (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20AMD%20(iGPU)">AMD (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20Intel%20for%203D">Intel for 3D</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20AMD%20for%203D">AMD for 3D</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20System"><b>Mid-Range System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20High-End%20System"><b>High-End System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20High-End%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20High-End%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Premium%20System"><b>Premium System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Premium%20System:%20Intel%20(LGA%201156)">Intel (LGA 1156)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Premium%20System:%20Intel%20(LGA%201366)">Intel (LGA 1366)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_MicroATX%20System:%20Premium%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System"><b>ATX System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration"><b>General Consideration</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Price%20Range">Price Range</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20Feature%20Comparison">Feature Comparison</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20General%20Consideration:%20ATX%20Cases">ATX Cases</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System"><b>Low-End System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20Intel%20(iGPU)">Intel (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20AMD%20(iGPU)">AMD (iGPU)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20Intel%20for%203D">Intel for 3D</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Low-End%20System:%20AMD%20for%203D">AMD for 3D</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20System"><b>Mid-Range System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Mid-Range%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20High-End%20System"><b>High-End System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20High-End%20System:%20Intel">Intel</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20High-End%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Premium%20System"><b>Premium System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Premium%20System:%20Intel%20(LGA%201156)">Intel (LGA 1156)</a><br><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Premium%20System:%20Intel%20(LGA%201366)">Intel (LGA 1366)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Premium%20System:%20AMD">AMD</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Ultimate%20System"><b>Ultimate System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Ultimate%20System:%20Intel%20(LGA%201156)">Intel (LGA 1156)</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_ATX%20System:%20Ultimate%20System:%20Intel%20(LGA%201366)">Intel (LGA 1366)</a></li>
</ul></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_DAS%20(Direct%20Attached%20Storage)"><b>DAS (Direct Attached Storage)</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_DAS%20(Direct%20Attached%20Storage):%204/5/8-Bay%20SATA%20to%20eSATA%20Port%20Multiplier%20Enclosure%20with%20a%20SATA%206Gb/s%20RAID%20Host%20Adapter"><b>4/5/8-Bay SATA to eSATA Port Multiplier Enclosure with a SATA 6Gb/s RAID Host Adapter</b></a></li>
<li><a href="#user_DAS%20(Direct%20Attached%20Storage):%204/5-Bay%20SATA%20to%20eSATA/USB%203.0%20Hardware%20RAID%20Enclosure%20with%20or%20without%20a%20SATA%206Gb/s%20Host%20Adapter"><b>4/5-Bay SATA to eSATA/USB 3.0 Hardware RAID Enclosure with or without a SATA 6Gb/s Host Adapter</b></a></li>
<li><a href="#user_DAS%20(Direct%20Attached%20Storage):%208-Bay%20SATA/SAS%20to%20Mini-SAS%20Enclosure%20with%20a%20SAS%206Gb/s%20RAID%20Host%20Adapter"><b>8-Bay SATA/SAS to Mini-SAS Enclosure with a SAS 6Gb/s RAID Host Adapter</b></a></li>
<li><a href="#user_DAS%20(Direct%20Attached%20Storage):%20Other%20DAS%20Solutions"><b>Other DAS Solutions</b></a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Workstation"><b>Workstation</b></a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server"><b>Media Storage Server</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20General%20Consideration"><b>General Consideration</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20General%20Consideration:%20Purpose%20of%20a%20Media%20Storage%20Server">Purpose of a Media Storage Server</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20General%20Consideration:%20Component%20Selection">Component Selection</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20General%20Consideration:%20Backup">Backup</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20General%20Consideration:%20Feature%20Comparison">Feature Comparison</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20I"><b>Tower System I</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20I:%2012%20HDD">12 HDD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20I:%2015%20HDD">15 HDD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20I:%2015%20HDD%20with%20Hot%20Swap">15 HDD with Hot Swap</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20II"><b>Tower System II</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20II:%2016%20HDD">16 HDD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20II:%2020%20HDD">20 HDD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Tower%20System%20II:%2020%20HDD%20with%20Hot%20Swap">20 HDD with Hot Swap</a></li>
</ul></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Rackmount%20System"><b>Rackmount System</b></a>
<ul><li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Rackmount%20System:%2015%20HDD">15 HDD</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Rackmount%20System:%2020%20HDD%20with%20Hot%20Swap">20 HDD with Hot Swap</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Rackmount%20System:%2024%20HDD%20with%20Hot%20Swap%20I">24 HDD with Hot Swap I</a></li>
<li><a href="#user_Media%20Storage%20Server:%20Rackmount%20System:%2024%20HDD%20with%20Hot%20Swap%20II">24 HDD with Hot Swap II</a></li>
</ul></li>
</ul></li>
</ul>
 

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16,132 Posts
Discussion Starter #15,631
<p><span style="font-size:150%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a id="user_Introduction">Introduction</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Organization of the Contents</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Here is a brief summary of the contents.</p>
<br><ul><li><b>Introduction</b>: This section includes a brief summary of HTPC systems and hardware components.</li>
<li><b>Peripheral Components and OS</b>: I collected common hardware components used in each system here. OS (Windows only) is also mentioned.</li>
<li><b>Recommended HTPC systems</b>: This longest part is classified into several categories as stated below for convenience.</li>
<li><b>DAS (Direct Attached Storage)</b>: If you need more storage space, a quick solution is here.</li>
<li><b>Workstation</b>: A system for (serious) video editing tasks.</li>
<li><b>Server</b>: HD video files occupy lots of storage spaces. So you may need a dedicated media storage server.</li>
</ul><br><p><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Classification of HTPC Systems</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
HTPC systems here are classified into several categories for convenience, according to the following three criteria.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>1. Form Factor</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
A form factor specifies the physical dimensions of a system. Basically it is the motherboard form factor that defines the overall size of a system. There are dozens of standardized form factors. Among them we will be concerned with the following three most popular form factors.</p>
<br><ul><li><b>Mini-ITX</b>: 170mm x 170mm (6.7″ x 6.7″)</li>
<li><b>MicroATX</b>: 244mm x 244mm (9.6″ x 9.6″)</li>
<li><b>ATX</b>: 305mm x 244mm (12″ x 9.6″)</li>
</ul><br><p>Because of the size, Mini-ITX provides the least expandability (0 or 1 expansion slot), usually 2 memory slots and CPU support is often limited by the cooling performance of a small Mini-ITX system. MicroATX supports up to 4 expansion slots, while ATX supports up to 7 expansion slots. Usually a Mini-ITX/microATX motherboard supports an integrated graphics so that you may not need a discrete graphic card. An ATX case can usually hold more storage drives than an microATX case, and a microATX case can hold more storage drives than an Mini-ITX case.<br><br>
Here is a physical comparison of actual Mini-ITX motherboard/case, microATX motherboard/case and ATX motherboard/case, along with an AV receiver.</p>
<blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Form_Factor_1.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Form_Factor_2.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<p>You may wonder why the width of the microATX case is almost the same as that of the ATX case. The reason is simple: the PSU is usually laid flat in a microATX case, while it is laid vertically in an ATX case. As a consequence, a microATX case is usually shorter in height than an ATX case.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>2. Performance and Cost</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Typical tasks done by a HTPC are</p>
<ul><li><b>Playing back</b> (or watching) media contents including:
<ul><li>Non-streamed media such as DVD movies, Blu-ray Disc movies, CDs.</li>
<li>Streamed media such as TV and radio (terrestrial, satellite, cable, Internet).</li>
<li>Media files stored locally.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Creating</b> media files from various sources, non-streaming or streaming (usually called "ripping" or "recording"), and storing them for later use.</li>
<li><b>Editing</b>, including re-encoding, media files.</li>
</ul><br><p>Hardware components that are important for each task is:</p>
<ul><li><b>Playing back video</b>: This includes decoding and various post-processing (deinterlacing, rescaling etc.). <b>GPU</b> is the most important for this task (unless you resort to a software playback solution such as ffdshow). A couple of GPUs integrated in motherboard are good. If you want to get the best picture quality, a good mid-range discrete GPU is recommended, however. A high-end card is good for better gaming experience of course, but it rarely improves video playback performance.</li>
<li><b>Ripping</b>: The speed of ripping DVD/BD discs is often limited by the reading speed of the <b>optical disc drive</b> used.</li>
<li><b>Recording</b>: HDTV contents are already encoded in either MPEG-2 or H.264. So this is very easy for any system.</li>
<li><b>Editing and re-encoding video</b> (except for simple cut and join): This is one of the most <b>CPU</b>-intensive tasks. A good quad-core (or more) processor is recommended. A trend is that GPU (stream processors) offloads CPU, and several video editing applications already support it (keywords: GPGPU, OpenCL, Microsoft DirectCompute, NVIDIA CUDA, AMD APP).</li>
</ul><br><p>In general better performance means more cost.<br><br>
Performance and cost is the secondary category of the list.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>3. CPU-Chipset-GPU Manufacturers</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>CPU</b>, <b>chipset</b> (in motherboard; controlling various I/O devices and connecting them to CPU/memory) and <b>GPU</b> are the three main hardware components of a system. Intel and AMD are the main suppliers of CPU for PC. Intel and AMD are producing chipsets for its own CPUs. Intel (integrated GPU only), AMD and NVIDIA are the top three GPU manufacturers.<br><br>
CPU/chipset/GPU manufacturers is the third category of the list.<br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Component Selection</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
The components selected here are based on my hand-on experience and/or my extensive research. Here are general considerations in choosing components.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>CPU</a></b></span></span></span></p>
<ul><li><b>Below $60</b>: Intel Celeron E3400 (dual-core) is a nice, cheap processor.</li>
<li><b>$60 to $150</b>: Intel Core i3 540 (dual-core, quad-thread) is an excellent processor with integrated graphics and low power consumption. AMD Athlon II X3 (triple-core)/X4 (quad-core) is more powerful in some applications (e.g. video encoding).</li>
<li><b>Over $150</b>: Intel Core i5 and i7 (Lynnfield and Bloomfield; quad-core, octo-thread in i7) are excellent general purpose processors. Phenom II X6 (hexa-core) is good for heavily threaded applications.</li>
</ul><br><p><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Chipset and Motherboard</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Intel produces chipsets for its own chips and AMD for its own chips. ASUS, ASRock, GIGABYTE and MSI are the top four motherboard manufacturers and their motherboards are in general very reliable. The performance of a motherboard is mostly determined by the chipset and there is little difference between the manufacturers. So the main selection factor is the features of the motherboard, e.g. the number of PCI Express slots, USB 3.0, IEEE 1394.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Memory</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>DDR2 vs. DDR3</b><br><br>
DDR3 SDRAM is the mainstream memory standard and you should choose it unless you already have DDR2 memory modules.<br><br><b>Capacity, frequency, timings, voltage</b><br><br><b>A pair of 2GB memory modules</b>, 4GB in total, is standard right now. Currently both Intel and AMD desktop processors support up to DDR3-1333. Considering slight overclocking capability, <b>DDR3-1600</b> is a good choice. CAS latency (CL) and timings are important for memory-intensive applications, in particular games. However these have little effect on the majority of HTPC-related tasks. So just ignore them. Even in games, memory affects the performance the least among CPU, memory and GPU. You'd better spend money on better CPU/GPU instead of spending money on expensive "performance" memory modules. The standard operating voltage of DDR3 SDRAM is 1.5V. Some memory modules require higher voltage than that for better stability. Adjust the memory voltage in BIOS according to the specifications of your memory modules.<br><br><b>Brand</b><br><br>
Basically the brand does not matter in performance as the standards are established by JEDEC rigorously. It's not like Intel vs. AMD in CPU. Reliability and overclockability may vary from brand to brand, however.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Graphics and Sound Devices</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
With the advent of Blu-ray Disc (and HD DVD), HDMI became the standard specifications for transmitting video and audio signals from a player/PC to an AV receiver/display. Right now there are basically three HDMI solutions in PC:</p>
<br><ul><li>AMD Radeon HD 5xxx graphics cards; to be replaced by HD 6xxx Series in Q3 2010 and Q1 2011.</li>
<li>Intel Core i3/i5 <i>Clarkdale</i> processors (that integrate GPU); to be replaced by the <i>Sandy Bridge</i> processors in Q1 2011.</li>
<li>NVIDIA GeForce GT 430, GTS 450, GTX 4xx, GTX 5xx.</li>
</ul><br><p>AMD and Intel support HD video playback and HD audio bitstreaming. <i>Clarkdale</i> lacks proper 23.976Hz playback, however. Higher-end NVIDIA's solutions (GTX 465 and higher, GTX 570 and higher) do not support HD audio bitstreaming.<br><br>
Here is a summary of audio formats supported by various PC video/audio solutions.</p>
<ul><li><b>Dolby Digital and DTS bitstreams, and stereo LPCM</b>
<ul><li>Every motherboard's onboard audio codec (via optical or coaxial S/PDIF connector)</li>
<li>Every AMD 760G/780G/785G/790GX/880G/890GX chipset motherboard (via onboard HDMI)</li>
<li>All the solutions mentioned below</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Multichannel LPCM over HDMI</b>
<ul><li>Every ION/GeForce 8200/8300/GeForce 9300/9400 chipset motherboard (via onboard HDMI)</li>
<li>Every GeForce 210/GT 220/GT 240/GT 430/GTS 450/GTX 4xx/GTX 5xx graphics card</li>
<li>Every Radeon HD 4xxx/5xxx/6xxx graphics card</li>
<li>Every Intel G41/G43/G45 chipset motherboard (via onboard HDMI)</li>
<li>Every Intel Core i5/i3 (<i>Clarkdale</i>) processor (via an H55/H57 chipset motherboard with onboard HDMI)</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD High Resolution Audio/Master Audio bitstreams</b>
<ul><li>Every Radeon HD 5xxx/6xxx graphics card</li>
<li>Every GeForce GT 430/GTX 450/GTX 460 graphics card</li>
<li>Every Intel Core i5/i3 (<i>Clarkdale</i>) processor (via an H55/H57 chipset motherboard with onboard HDMI)</li>
</ul></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_HDMI_Audio_Solution.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<p><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>My Pick of HTPC</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
In case you have no idea what to choose (and no time to dig), here are my pick. The system provides the best video/audio playback performance, as well as reasonably good performance/low power consumption in various CPU intensive tasks. If you have (or will have) a HDMI 1.4a 3D HDTV or projector and are interested in 3D videos, choose GeForce GT 430.<br><br><b>MicroATX Mid-Range Intel System</b></p>
<br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>GIGABYTE GA-H57M-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H57 chipset microATX, $121. If you want a PCI Express x1 slot, you can choose <b>ASRock H55M Pro</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset microATX, $95, but this lacks USB 3.0.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $60.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100287VGAL (VGA) or 100287L (DisplayPort)</b> HD 5670 GDDR5 512MB , $80.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>EVGA 01G-P3-1430-LR</b> GeForce GT 430 DDR3 1GB low-profile, $70.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-430 Bronze</b>, $60. An alternative is <b>Corsair VX450W CMPSU-450VX</b> 450W, $60.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec Fusion Remote Black</b> microATX, with a LCD/IR receiver/remote, $140.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$634</b></span> for AMD, <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$629</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_MidRange_Intel.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 

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<span style="font-size:150%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Peripheral Components and OS</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
A HTPC needs peripheral components (input devices, optical drive, TV tuner, sound card etc.) to be functional besides the core components (CPU, motherboard, memory, graphics card, HDD, PSU and case). The following is a quick list of recommended peripheral components and OS. In the subsequent sections, I will give only core components.<br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Input Device</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>MCE Remote</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
A MCE remote is a (usually IR) remote control and a receiver to be attached to the HTPC (internally or externally via USB) that controls Windows Media Center and other front ends/media players at a distant place. Some HTPC cases and TV tuner cards come with a MCE remote. If not, you can buy one.<br><ul><li><b>GP-IR01BK Windows Vista MCE Remote Control</b> External IR Receiver and Remote, $24, or <b>GP-IR02BK Windows Vista MCE 2 Channel Remote Control</b> External IR Receiver and Remote, $24.</li>
<li><b>Antec Multimedia Station Basic</b> Internal IR Receiver and Remote, $19.</li>
<li><b>Antec Multimedia Station Elite</b> Internal IR Receiver with a VFD and Remote, $54.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MCE_Remote.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Universal Remote</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
If you want to control all entertainment equipments at your home theater room, a universal remote is a must. Your HTPC needs to have an IR receiver (so you first need to have a MCE remote).<br><ul><li><b>Logitech Harmony One Advanced Universal Remote</b>, $160.</li>
<li><b>Logitech Harmony 700</b> (A stripped version of Harmony One: up to <b>six</b> devices, non-touch screen), $100.</li>
<li><b>Logitech Harmony 900</b> (Harmony One + RF capabilities), $278.</li>
<li><b>Logitech Harmony 1100</b> (3.5″ touch screen; RF capabilities), $270.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Universal_Remote.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
You may be able to find an older model (refurbished):<br><ul><li><b>Logitech Harmony 880 Advanced Universal Remote</b>, $88.</li>
<li><b>Logitech Harmony 890 Advanced Universal Remote</b> (Harmony 880 + RF capabilities), $145.</li>
</ul><br>
The following is a universal remote (PC via RF + three CE devices via IR) with Gyration's MotionSense technology, eliminating the need for a mouse.<br><ul><li><b>Gyration Air Music Remote GYR4101US</b>, $52, or <b>Gyration Air Music Remote with Compact Keyboard GYR4101CKUS</b>, $112.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Gyration_Air_Mouse_Remote_with_Compact_Keyboard.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Keyboard and Mouse</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>Adesso 2.4 GHz RF Wireless Multimedia/MCE Keyboard with Optical Trackball WKB-3200UB</b>, $52.</li>
<li><b>Logitech diNovo Edge</b>, $147.</li>
<li><b>Logitech diNovo Mini</b>, $120.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Keyboard_and_Mouse.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>So what do you need?</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
So what do you need (besides a keyboard and a mouse when installing software)? There is no simple answer.<br><ul><li>If you just want to control a front end remotely, a cheap MCE remote may be enough. But you still need to a keyboard/mouse, for example, to surf the web.</li>
<li>Logitech Harmony is good to control lots of CE devices as well as HTPC. But you still need to a keyboard/mouse, for example, to surf the web.</li>
<li>If you want to use your HTPC more like a normal PC (e.g. web browsing) without using a keyboard/mouse, Gyration is a good choice. This can also control three other CE devices.</li>
</ul><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Optical Disc Drive</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>BD Writer/Reader / DVD Writer/Reader</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>LG WH10LS30</b> BD Writer / DVD Writer with LightScribe (BD-ROM DL: 8x), $95.</li>
<li><b>LG UH10LS20</b> Blue BD Reader / DVD Writer with LightScribe (BD-ROM DL: 8x), $70.</li>
<li><b>LITE-ON iHES108</b> BD Reader / DVD Writer (BD-ROM DL: 4x), $48.</li>
<li><b>LITE-ON iHOS104</b> BD Reader / DVD Reader (BD-ROM DL: 4x), $48.</li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>BD Writer/Reader / DVD Writer - Slim Type</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>Sony Optiarc BD-5730S</b> Slim Type BD Writer / DVD Writer (BD-ROM DL: 4x), $174.</li>
<li><b>LG CT21N</b> Slim Type BD Reader / DVD Writer (BD-ROM DL: 6x), $132.</li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>DVD Writer</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>LITE-ON iHAS424</b> DVD Writer with LightScribe, $26.</li>
<li><b>LITE-ON iHAS324</b> DVD Writer, $22.</li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>DVD Writer - Slim Type</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>Sony Optiarc AD-7700S</b> Slim Type DVD Writer, $32.</li>
</ul><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>TV Tuner Card for ATSC/Cable</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Digital+Analog</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>AVerMedia AVerTV Combo G2</b> PCIe x1 Card, low-profile (White Box or Media Center Upgrade Kit), $75. A dual tuner, one for analog cable, one for ATSC/clear digital cable).</li>
<li><b>Hauppauge WinTV-HVR-2250</b> PCIe x1 Card, low-profile (White Box or MC Kit), $103. A dual hybrid tuner. Each tuner individually acts as analog cable or ATSC/clear digital cable.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_TV_Tuner_Digital-Analog.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Digital Only</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>AVerMedia AVerTVHD Duet</b> PCIe x1 Card, low-profile (White Box), $58. A dual digital tuner.</li>
<li><b>Silicondust HDHomeRun</b> Networked Device, $131. A dual digital tuner.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_TV_Tuner_Digital_Only.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Digital Cable Tuner Card</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>Ceton InfiniTV 4</b> Digital Cable Quad-Tuner PCIe x1 Card, low-profile, <a href="http://www.cetoncorp.com/buy.php" target="_blank">$399</a>. A quad digital tuner.</li>
<li><b>Silicondust HDHomeRun PRIME</b> Networked Device, $249. A triple digital tuner. Available soon.</li>
<li><b>Hauppauge WinTV</b> USB Device</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Digital_Cable_Tuner_Card.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
These cards enable any PC running <b>Windows 7 Media Center</b> on your local network to watch or record up to four (Ceton; the max number of CableCARD tuners Windows 7 allows)/three (HDHomeRun) live cable channels at once, including <b>premium channels</b>. You just need:<br><ul><li>Digital cable subscription from a US cable provider</li>
<li>Multi-Stream CableCARD (M-Card) available from your cable provider</li>
</ul><br>
A limitation on recordings is:<br><ul><li>A content marked as <b>Copy Freely</b> has no DRM in your recording. It is basically the same as clear QAM contents once decrypted by the M-Card.</li>
<li>A content marked as <b>Copy Once</b> can be watched only on the PC where it was recorded and Media Center Extenders like the Xbox 360.</li>
</ul><br>
It is up to each cable provider which content is marked as Copy Freely/Copy Once.<br><br><b>References</b><br><ul><li><a href="http://thegreenbutton.com/forums/t/78488.aspx?PageIndex=1" target="_blank">The Green Button - Ceton MOCUR Q&A</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.silicondust.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=38" target="_blank">Silicondust Forum - HDHomeRun Prime</a></li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>HD Video Capturing</a></b></span></span></span><br><ul><li><b>Hauppauge HD PVR model 01212</b> USB Device, $176.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_HD_Video_Capturing.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
This device captures HD video contents, encrypted or unencrypted, via <b>component video</b> (i.e. analog) from a <b>cable or satellite TV set top box</b> in H.264 video with DD or AAC audio. Recordings are naturally <b>DRM-free</b>. You can watch/record one channel at a time with a HD PVR unit and a STB. You will need multiple HD PVR units and multiple STBs to watch/record multiple channels simultaneously.<br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Sound Card</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
If you are going to use an AV receiver, you are unlikely to use a discrete sound card because necessary hardware for HD digital audio is provided by either the motherboard's onboard audio codec or the HDMI on a graphics card (read <b>Introduction: Component Selection: Graphics and Sound Devices</b>). Here are some exceptions.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Analog</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Some people prefer an analog sound card to (the DAC and preamplifier processor part of) an AV receiver for several reasons. If you fall into this category, here is a list of a couple of good sound cards:<br><ul><li><b>ASUS Xonar Essence ST</b> PCI Card, $184, with <b>ASUS Xonar H6</b> Multi-Channel Extension Board, $46. The best analog sounds in this class.</li>
<li><b>HT$|$OMEGA CLARO plus+</b> PCI Sound Card, $175.</li>
<li><b>Auzentech Auzen X-Fi Bravura</b> PCIe x1 Card, $130.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Analog_Sound_Card.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
Note that if you use a commercial BD software player, HD audio will be downsampled with these cards. Ripping BD movies into another format such as MKV and playing them with appropriate audio decoders is a way around. For example, please read <a href="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=19370583#post19370583" target="_blank">this post</a>.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>S/PDIF</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
If you want to use S/PDIF out and your motherboard has only an internal S/PDIF connector, then you can build your own coaxial S/PDIF bracket for external connection. Buy<br><ul><li><a href="http://www.frontx.com/pro/p1062_030.html" target="_blank">RCA COMPOSITE VIDEO - PANEL F TO 1X3 F</a>, $6.30</li>
</ul><br>
from <a href="http://www.frontx.com/store/order_pb.html" target="_blank">FRONTX</a> and attach it to an empty PCI bracket by drilling a hole.<br><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_SPDIF_Bracket.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
If you want to use S/PDIF out, but your motherboard does not have an internal/external SPDIF connector, here are cheap S/PDIF solutions:<br><ul><li><b>Turtle Beach Audio Advantage Micro II</b> USB Sound Card (S/PDIF and stereo analog), $23.</li>
<li><b>PPA International PPA 1431V</b> PCI Sound Card 6 Channel, $10.</li>
<li><b>DIAMOND XtremeSound XS71</b> 7.1/24 bit PCI Card, $29.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_SPDIF_Sound_Card.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
Unlike analog sound cards, any cheap S/PDIF sound card is enough for this purpose. Its only role is transmit the Dolby Digital/DTS compressed audio format over S/PDIF.<br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>OS</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Microsoft Windows is the dominating OS in HTPC for good reasons. The latest Windows is recommended.<br><ul><li><b>Windows 7, Home Premium or higher, 32-bit or 64-bit, Retail or OEM or TechNet/MSDN Subscription</b>.</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_OS.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<b>Remarks</b><br><ul><li><b>Windows 7 Editions</b>: Home Premium is enough for normal HTPC tasks. 7 Home Premium supports full-system backup and restore unlike Vista Home Premium. You can find comparison of Windows 7 editions in <a href="http://content.windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/compare-editions" target="_blank">this Microsoft web page</a> and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_7_editions" target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>.<br></li>
<li><b>32 bit vs. 64 bit</b>: Advantages of Windows 64 bit are:
<ul><li>It supports <b>more than 4GB memory</b>; however this is not important because normal HTPC tasks won't get benefit from more than 4GB memory.</li>
<li>If you are going to boot from a HDD over 2.199TB capacity, you will need a motherboard with UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) and Windows 7/Vista 64-bit. (The 32-bit OS supports a data storage HDD over 2.199TB just fine.)</li>
</ul>
Disadvantages of Windows 64 bit are:
<ul><li>Windows Media Center of Windows 64-bit is a 64-bit application and hence <b>you can't use a couple of useful 32-bit DirectShow filters with its internal video player</b> (e.g. madFlac Decoder, ReClock, ArcSoft Audio Decoder, ArcSoft Video Decoder, CyberLink Video Decoder). This is not a fatal disadvantage however even if you use Windows Media Center as a front end; you can always use an external media player such as Media Player Classic HomeCinema.</li>
</ul>
So which one to choose? <b>Personally I recommend Windows 32-bit</b>. All the video playback applications (except for Windows Media Center in Windows 7 64-bit) are still 32-bit and there is no point of using the 64-bit OS. The 64-bit version simply creates complications in configuring the system for 32-bit players with zero performance benefit. By the time media players and video/audio codecs, in particular commercial Blu-ray players, are developed in 64-bit, Windows 7 will have been outdated anyway.<br></li>
<li><a href="http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/default.aspx" target="_blank"><b>TechNet Subscription</b></a>: You may want to subscribe TechNet Standard, $199 per year, or TechNet Professional, $349 per year, if you want to install Windows (including Windows Home Server), Microsoft Office, and/or other Microsoft applications on several (non-productive) machines. The license is <b>valid indefinitely</b>. You can activate a product with the supplied product key even after your subscription expires, up to 10 times per product key. You can obtain 2 retail keys for each product in Standard and 5 retail keys for each product in Professional, so that 2 x 10 = <b>20 times</b> or 5 x 10 = <b>50 times</b> <b>activation</b> is allowed in several machines for each product. Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional and Ultimate are counted as different products, but the 32-bit version and the 64-bit version of each edition are counted as the same product. You can't download products or obtain product keys after the expiration of your subscription, of course.</li>
</ul>
 

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<span style="font-size:150%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Mini-ITX System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>General Consideration</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Mini-ITX form factor has become popular because of its small footprint. However there are a couple of limitations. It supports at most one expansion slot. So if you decide to add a discrete graphics card, for example, you can't use an internal TV tuner card. A Mini-ITX case is usually very small, hence there is often a space limitation for the CPU cooler, storage drives and PSU. In many cases you can use only a slim-type optical drive and/or a 2.5″ HDD, that are often expensive. If you agree with these limitations, a Mini-ITX system can be not only a good HTPC but also a gaming machine or a video encoding machine by placing a powerful discrete graphics card and/or CPU.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Price Range</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
I will give a standard system, a standard 3D system, a mid-range gaming system and a high-end gaming system, for each of Intel chip-Intel chipset and AMD chip-AMD chipset.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Feature Comparison</a></b></span></span></span><br><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_Systems_Feature_Comparison.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<b>Legend</b><br><ul><li>In general
<ul><li>◯: Supported.</li>
<li>△: Partially supported.</li>
<li>✕: Not supported.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Video (GPU)</b>
<ul><li><b>MPEG-2</b>: Full hardware acceleration of MPEG-2 decoding.</li>
<li><b>VC-1</b>: Full hardware acceleration of VC-1 decoding.</li>
<li><b>H.264</b>: Full hardware acceleration of H.264/MPEG-4 AVC decoding.</li>
<li><b>23.976Hz</b>: Support for the 23.976Hz refresh rate.</li>
<li><b>VA Deinterlacing</b>: Vector Adaptive Deinterlacing or an equivalent for HD and SD interlaced video contents.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>3D Video (CPU/GPU)</b>
<ul><li><b>MVC (GPU)</b>: Full hardware acceleration of MPEG-4 MVC (the Blu-ray 3D video codec) decoding.</li>
<li><b>MVC (CPU)</b>: MPEG-4 MVC decoding by CPU when MVC decoding by GPU is not supported. △ means that BR 3D is playable, but the CPU usage is very high (66% to 99%).</li>
<li><b>2D➝3D (CPU)</b>: Conversion of 2D video to 3D by CPU. Converting 2D SD video is easy, but converting 2D HD video is CPU intensive.</li>
<li><b>HDMI 1.4a 3D</b>: Support for the mandatory 3D video format structures by HDMI 1.4a.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>HDMI Audio (GPU)</b>: This indicates supported audio formats over HDMI from the GPU.
<ul><li><b>Stereo LPCM</b>: Support for stereo LPCM.</li>
<li><b>DD/DTS</b>: Support for bitstreaming Dolby Digital and DTS.</li>
<li><b>Multi LPCM</b>: Support for multichannel (5.1 and 7.1) LPCM.</li>
<li><b>TrueHD/DTS-HD</b>: Support for bitstreaming Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio/High Resolution Audio.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>S/PDIF Audio (MB)</b>
<ul><li><b>Optical or Coax</b>: This indicates the existence of an S/PDIF connector (optical or coaxial) on the rear panel of the motherboard.</li>
<li><b>DDL or DTSI</b>: DDL is Dolby Digital Live, DTSI is DTS Interactive. These technologies encode multichannel LPCM sent to the audio codec of the motherboard into Dolby Digital or DTS in real time. A convenient tool to get surround sounds from <b>games</b> over S/PDIF.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Analog Audio (MB)</b>
<ul><li><b>Channel Count</b>: The supported number of channels of analog audio from the audio codec of the motherboard.</li>
<li><b>PAP</b>: Support for Protected Audio Path. If this exists, you may be able to get full quality lossless analog audio from Blu-ray Disc movies when you use a (not necessarily every) commercial Blu-ray Disc software player.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Other Features (MB)</b>
<ul><li><b>SATA 2.0</b>: The number of SATA 2.0 (3Gbps) internal connectors.</li>
<li><b>eSATA 2.0</b>: The number of eSATA 3Gbps connectors on the real panel.</li>
<li><b>USB 3.0</b>: The number of USB 3.0 connectors on the rear panel if exists.</li>
<li><b>IEEE 1394</b>: Support for IEEE 1394 (aka FireWire).</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Video Encoding (CPU)</b>
<ul><li><b>Frame per Sec.</b>: <a href="http://www.techarp.com/showarticle.aspx?artno=520" target="_blank">x264 HD Benchmark 3.0</a> Render Speed (Pass 2).</li>
<li><b>Power per Frame</b>: The AC power draw of the total system to encode a frame in the above benchmark. The value depends on PSU's efficiency, which depends on various factors. So take it as a rough estimate.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Power Consumption (DC)</b>: The DC power draw of the total system excluding PSU. The AC power draw from the wall is (DC power draw)/(Efficiency of the PSU).
<ul><li><b>Idle</b>: At idle.</li>
<li><b>BD Playback</b>: At BD movie (an ISO stored in the internal HDD) playback by PowerDVD 10 Ultra.</li>
<li><b>CPU Load</b>: At Prime95 (Small FFTs).</li>
<li><b>GPU Load</b>: At FurMark (Stress Test).</li>
<li><b>CPU+GPU Load</b>: At Prime95 (Small FFTs) and FurMark (Stress Test) simultaneously.</li>
</ul></li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Mini-ITX Cases</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
There are several nice Mini-ITX cases. For example, (LP = low profile, FH = full height)<br><ul><li><b>Antec ISK 300-150</b> Mini-ITX, 1 x 5.25″ slim/2 x 2.5″/1 x LP slot, W222 x H96 x D328 mm, 150W, $71.</li>
<li><b>Antec ISK 310-150</b> Mini-ITX, 1 x 5.25″ slim/2 x 2.5″/1 x LP slot, W222 x H96 x D328 mm, 150W, $71.</li>
<li><b>Apex MI-008</b> Mini-ITX, 1 x 5.25″/2 x 3.5″/1 x FH slot, W220 x H129 x D300 mm, 250W, $40.</li>
<li><b>Apex MI-100BK</b> Mini-ITX, 1 x 5.25″/2 x 3.5″/1 x FH slot, W220 x H129 x D300 mm, 250W, $50.</li>
<li><b>Mini-Box.com M350</b> Mini-ITX, no 5.25″/2 x 2.5″/no slot, W192 x H62 x D210 mm, $40, with <b>Mini-Box.com picoPSU-120 + 102W Adapter Power Kit</b>, $55.</li>
<li><b>SilverStone Sugo SG05-450 SST-SG05BB-450</b> Mini-ITX/Mini-DTX, 1 x 5.25″ slim/1 x 3.5″/1 x 2.5″/2 x FH slot, W222 x H176 x D276 mm, 450W, $120.</li>
<li><b>SilverStone Sugo SG07 SST-SG07B</b> Mini-ITX/Mini-DTX, 1 x 5.25″ slim/1 x 3.5″/2 x 2.5″/2 x FH slot, W222 x H190 x D350 mm, 600W, $200.</li>
</ul><br>
from top left to bottom right in the figure.<br><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_Cases.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
I will use Antec ISK 310-150 in the standard systems, SilverStone Sugo SG05-450 in the mid-range gaming systems, and SilverStone Sugo SG07″ the high-end gaming systems.
 

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<span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Standard System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel (iGPU)</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> The current Intel processor/GPU are packed in a mini-ITX case.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>GIGABYTE GA-H55N-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset Mini-ITX, $110. An alternative is <b>ECS H55H-I</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset Mini-ITX, $80, or <b>Intel DH57JG</b> LGA1156 Intel H57 chipset Mini-ATX, $120.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ</b> DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $59.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: Intel HD Graphics (integrated in the chipset), $0.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Seagate Momentus 7200.4 ST9500420AS</b> 500GB SATA 3.0Gbps mobile 7200 RPM, $60.</li>
<li>PSU: Antec FP-150-8 FlexATX 150W PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec ISK 310-150</b> Mini-ITX, $71.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$414</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_Standard_Intel_iGPU.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<b>Reference</b><br><ul><li><a href="http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1234273" target="_blank">AVS Forum - *Official* Intel DH57JG "<i>Jet Geyser</i>" Mini-ITX Motherboard Thread</a></li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD (iGPU)</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> The current AMD processor/iGPU are packed in a mini-ITX case.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X2 255 ADX255OCGQBOX/ADX255OCGMBOX</b> 3.1GHz 65W AM3, $63.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS M4A88T-I Deluxe</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB710 chipsets Mini-ITX, $136.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-4GBSQ</b> DDR3-1333 CL9 SO-DIMM 2 x 2GB Kit, $50.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: Radeon HD 4250 (integrated in the chipset), $0.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Seagate Momentus 7200.4 ST9500420AS</b> 500GB SATA 3.0Gbps mobile 7200 RPM, $60.</li>
<li>PSU: Antec FP-150-8 FlexATX 150W PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec ISK 310-150</b> Mini-ITX, $71.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$380</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_Standard_AMD_iGPU.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> Instead of a pricier AMD chipset, this system uses a 4-year-old NVIDIA chipset, with a better discrete graphics card. Video playback performance is better than the above system and HD audio bitstreaming is supported.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X2 255 ADX255OCGQBOX/ADX255OCGMBOX</b> 3.1GHz 65W AM3, $63.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>J&W MINIX 6150SE-UC3</b> AM3 GeForce 6150SE/nForce 430 chipset Mini-ITX, <a href="http://www.aliexpress.com/product-fm/345332475-J-W-MINIX-6150SE-UC3-WITH-DVI-VGA-AM3-DDR3-wholesalers.html" target="_blank">$85</a>.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ</b> DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $59.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: <b>PowerColor AX5450 512MK3-SH</b> Radeon HD 5450 GDDR3 512MB, $40.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Seagate Momentus 7200.4 ST9500420AS</b> 500GB SATA 3.0Gbps mobile 7200 RPM, $60.</li>
<li>PSU: Antec FP-150-8 FlexATX 150W PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec ISK 310-150</b> Mini-ITX, $71.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$378</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_Standard_AMD.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel for 3D</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b><br><br>
This system is specifically intended for 3D videos in a HDMI 1.4a HDTV/projector. The graphics card can decode Blu-ray 3D codec and output in the Frame Packing format. CPU is powerful enough for 2D to 3D conversion.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ECS H55H-I</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset Mini-ITX, $80.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ</b> DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $59.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: <b>EVGA 01G-P3-1430-LR</b> GeForce GT 430 DDR3 1GB low-profile, $70, with <a href="http://www.evga.com/products/moreInfo.asp?pn=M020-00-000134&family=Accessories%20-%20Hardware&sw=4" target="_blank"><b>EVGA Low Profile Bracket M020-00-000134</b></a>, $5.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Seagate Momentus 7200.4 ST9500420AS</b> 500GB SATA 3.0Gbps mobile 7200 RPM, $60.</li>
<li>PSU: Antec FP-150-8 FlexATX 150W PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec ISK 310-150</b> Mini-ITX, $71.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$459</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_Standard_Intel_for_3D.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 

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<span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Mid-Range Gaming System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
The systems here are based on <a href="http://www.silverstonetek.com/products/p_contents.php?pno=SG05-450&area=usa" target="_blank">SilverStone SG05-450 Mini-DTX/Mini-ITX case</a>. The case supports a 2-slot graphics card of up to 9″ length and has a 450W PSU.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>GIGABYTE GA-H55N-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset Mini-ITX, $110. An alternative is <b>ECS H55H-I</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset Mini-ITX, $80.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $60.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100315L</b> HD 6850 GDDR5 1GB, $187.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>GIGABYTE GV-N460OC-1GI</b> GeForce GTX 460 1GB, $190.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Crucial RealSSD C300 64GB CTFDDAC064MAG</b> 64GB SATA 6.0Gbps SSD, $134.</li>
<li>PSU: SFX12V 450W 80 PLUS Bronze PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>SilverStone Sugo SG05-450 SST-SG05BB-450</b> Mini-ITX/Mini-DTX, $120.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$725</b></span> for AMD, <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$728</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_MidRangeGaming_Intel.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X4 640 ADX640WFGMBOX</b> 3.0GHz 95W AM3, $100.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: <b>Cooler Master Vortex Plus RR-VTPS-28PK-R1</b>, $27. The fan should be oriented reversely.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS M4A88T-I Deluxe</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB710 chipsets Mini-ITX, $136.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-4GBSQ</b> DDR3-1333 CL9 SO-DIMM 2 x 2GB Kit, $50.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100315L</b> HD 6850 GDDR5 1GB, $187.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>GIGABYTE GV-N460OC-1GI</b> GeForce GTX 460 1GB, $190.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Crucial RealSSD C300 64GB CTFDDAC064MAG</b> 64GB SATA 6.0Gbps SSD, $134.</li>
<li>PSU: SFX12V 450W 80 PLUS Bronze PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>SilverStone Sugo SG05-450 SST-SG05BB-450</b> Mini-ITX/Mini-DTX, $120.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$754</b></span> for AMD, <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$757</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_MidRangeGaming_AMD.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 

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<span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>High-End Gaming System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
The systems here are based on <a href="http://www.silverstonetek.com/products/p_contents.php?pno=SG07&area=usa" target="_blank">SilverStone SG07 Mini-DTX/Mini-ITX case</a>. The case supports a 2-slot graphics card of up to 12.2 in length and has a 600W PSU.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i5-760</b> 2.80GHz 95W LGA1156, $195.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: <b>Prolimatech Samuel 17</b>, $35, with <b>GELID Solutions Silent 12 PWM FN-PX12-15</b> 120mm fan with PWM control, $9. An alternative is <b>Thermalright AXP-140 RT</b>, $63 (hard to find right now) or <b>Cooler Master Vortex Plus RR-VTPS-28PK-R1</b>, $27.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>GIGABYTE GA-H55N-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset Mini-ITX, $110.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ</b> DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $59.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100311SR</b> HD 6970 GDDR5 2GB, $380.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>EVGA 012-P3-1570-AR</b> GeForce GTX 570 1280MB, $360. A better (and more expensive) alternative is <b>EVGA 015-P3-1580-AR</b> GeForce GTX 580 1536MB, $520.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Crucial RealSSD C300 128GB CTFDDAC128MAG</b> 128GB SATA 6.0Gbps SSD, $255.</li>
<li>PSU: Custom 600W 80 PLUS Bronze PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>SilverStone Sugo SG07 SST-SG07B</b> Mini-ITX/Mini-DTX, $200.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$1239</b></span> for AMD, <span><b>$1219</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_HighEndGaming_Intel.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<b>Remark</b><br><ul><li>Cooler Master Vortex Plus, Prolimatech Samuel 17 and Thermalright AXP-140 RT are those of the few CPU coolers that fits GA-H55N-USB3.</li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Phenom II X6 1055T HDT55TWFGRBOX</b> 2.8GHz <b>95W</b> AM3 (not available in US), $190. An alternative is <b>Phenom II X4 945 HDX945WFGIBOX/HDX945WFGMBOX</b> 3.0GHz 95W AM3, $135. (The motherboard does not support a 125W processor.)</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: <b>Cooler Master Geminii S RR-CCH-PBJ1-GP / RR-CCH-PBU1-GP</b>, $33.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS M4A88T-I Deluxe</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB710 chipsets Mini-ITX, $136.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-4GBSQ</b> DDR3-1333 CL9 SO-DIMM 2 x 2GB Kit, $50.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100311SR</b> HD 6970 GDDR5 2GB, $380.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>EVGA 012-P3-1570-AR</b> GeForce GTX 570 1280MB, $360. A better (and more expensive) alternative is <b>EVGA 015-P3-1580-AR</b> GeForce GTX 580 1536MB, $520.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Crucial RealSSD C300 128GB CTFDDAC128MAG</b> 128GB SATA 6.0Gbps SSD, $255.</li>
<li>PSU: Custom 600W 80 PLUS Bronze PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>SilverStone Sugo SG07 SST-SG07B</b> Mini-ITX/Mini-DTX, $200.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$1244</b></span> for AMD, <span><b>$1224</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_Mini-ITX_HighEndGaming_AMD.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 

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<span style="font-size:150%;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>MicroATX System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>General Consideration</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
A microATX system is perhaps the most popular form factor in HTPC because it generally costs less and is smaller than ATX, yet has enough number of expansion slots of 4.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Price Range</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
I will give a pure budget system, a low-end system, a mid-range system, a high-end system and a premium system for each of Intel chip-Intel chipset and AMD chip-AMD chipset. Basic distinctions are:<br><ul><li><b>Budget System</b>: provides reasonably good video playback performance at as low cost as possible.</li>
<li><b>Low-End System</b>: provides reasonably good video playback performance at a low cost.</li>
<li><b>Mid-Range System</b>: provides the best video playback performance without compromise.</li>
<li><b>High-End System</b>: should be able to handle other HTPC-related tasks such as video re-encoding and games with reasonably good performance.</li>
<li><b>Premium System</b>: is intended to be the best (but not too expensive) overall system available today.</li>
</ul><br>
I set the following criteria for expansion slots:<br><ul><li>Budget and Low-End:
<ul><li>1 x PCIe 2.0 x16 for a 2-slot graphics card</li>
<li>1 x PCIe x1 for a sound card or a TV tuner</li>
</ul></li>
<li>Mid-Range and High-End:
<ul><li>1 x PCIe 2.0 x8 (or higher) for a 2-slot graphics card</li>
<li>1 x PCIe x4 (or higher) for HBA</li>
<li>1 x PCIe x1 for a sound card or a TV tuner</li>
</ul></li>
<li>Premium:
<ul><li>2 x PCIe 2.0 x8 (or higher) for dual 2-slot graphics (CrossFireX and/or SLI)</li>
</ul></li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Feature Comparison</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_Systems_Feature_Comparison.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<br><b>Legend</b><br><ul><li>In general
<ul><li>◯: Supported.</li>
<li>△: Partially supported.</li>
<li>✕: Not supported.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Video (GPU)</b>
<ul><li><b>MPEG-2</b>: Full hardware acceleration of MPEG-2 decoding.</li>
<li><b>VC-1</b>: Full hardware acceleration of VC-1 decoding.</li>
<li><b>H.264</b>: Full hardware acceleration of H.264/MPEG-4 AVC decoding.</li>
<li><b>23.976Hz</b>: Support for the 23.976Hz refresh rate.</li>
<li><b>VA Deinterlacing</b>: Vector Adaptive Deinterlacing or an equivalent for HD and SD interlaced video contents.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>3D Video (CPU/GPU)</b>
<ul><li><b>MVC (GPU)</b>: Full hardware acceleration of MPEG-4 MVC (the Blu-ray 3D video codec) decoding.</li>
<li><b>MVC (CPU)</b>: MPEG-4 MVC decoding by CPU when MVC decoding by GPU is not supported. △ means that BR 3D is playable, but the CPU usage is very high (66% to 99%).</li>
<li><b>2D➝3D (CPU)</b>: Conversion of 2D video to 3D by CPU. Converting 2D SD video is easy, but converting 2D HD video is CPU intensive.</li>
<li><b>HDMI 1.4a 3D</b>: Support for the mandatory 3D video format structures by HDMI 1.4a.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>HDMI Audio (GPU)</b>: This indicates supported audio formats over HDMI from the GPU.
<ul><li><b>Stereo LPCM</b>: Support for stereo LPCM.</li>
<li><b>DD/DTS</b>: Support for bitstreaming Dolby Digital and DTS.</li>
<li><b>Multi LPCM</b>: Support for multichannel (5.1 and 7.1) LPCM.</li>
<li><b>TrueHD/DTS-HD</b>: Support for bitstreaming Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio/High Resolution Audio.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>S/PDIF Audio (MB)</b>
<ul><li><b>Optical or Coax</b>: This indicates the existence of an S/PDIF connector (optical or coaxial) on the rear panel of the motherboard.</li>
<li><b>DDL or DTSI</b>: DDL is Dolby Digital Live, DTSI is DTS Interactive. These technologies encode multichannel LPCM sent to the audio codec of the motherboard into Dolby Digital or DTS in real time. A convenient tool to get surround sounds from <b>games</b> over S/PDIF.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Analog Audio (MB)</b>
<ul><li><b>Channel Count</b>: The supported number of channels of analog audio from the audio codec of the motherboard.</li>
<li><b>PAP</b>: Support for Protected Audio Path. If this exists, you may be able to get full quality lossless analog audio from Blu-ray Disc movies when you use a (not necessarily every) commercial Blu-ray Disc software player.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Other Features (MB)</b>
<ul><li><b>SATA 2.0</b>: The number of SATA 2.0 (3Gbps) internal connectors.</li>
<li><b>eSATA 2.0</b>: The number of eSATA 3Gbps connectors on the real panel.</li>
<li><b>USB 3.0</b>: The number of USB 3.0 connectors on the rear panel if exists.</li>
<li><b>IEEE 1394</b>: Support for IEEE 1394 (aka FireWire).</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Video Encoding (CPU)</b>
<ul><li><b>Frame per Sec.</b>: <a href="http://www.techarp.com/showarticle.aspx?artno=520" target="_blank">x264 HD Benchmark 3.0</a> Render Speed (Pass 2).</li>
<li><b>Power per Frame</b>: The AC power draw of the total system to encode a frame in the above benchmark. The value depends on PSU's efficiency, which depends on various factors. So take it as a rough estimate.</li>
</ul></li>
<li><b>Power Consumption (DC)</b>: The DC power draw of the total system excluding PSU. The AC power draw from the wall is (DC power draw)/(Efficiency of the PSU).
<ul><li><b>Idle</b>: At idle.</li>
<li><b>BD Playback</b>: At BD movie (an ISO stored in the internal HDD) playback by PowerDVD 10 Ultra.</li>
<li><b>CPU Load</b>: At Prime95 (Small FFTs).</li>
<li><b>GPU Load</b>: At FurMark (Stress Test).</li>
<li><b>CPU+GPU Load</b>: At Prime95 (Small FFTs) and FurMark (Stress Test) simultaneously.</li>
</ul></li>
</ul><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>MicroATX Cases</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
There are many good microATX cases. For example,<br><br><b>Low-Profile Cases</b><br><ul><li><b>APEX DM-387</b> microATX, low-profile, $40. Includes a 270W PSU.</li>
<li><b>hec 7KJ9BBA30FNRX</b> microATX, low-profile, $50. Includes a 300W PSU.</li>
<li><b>hec 7K09BBA30FNRX</b> microATX, low-profile, $60. Includes a 300W PSU.</li>
<li><b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 1080P</b> microATX, low-profile, $70.</li>
<li><b>SilverStone Milo ML03 SST-ML03B</b> microATX, low-profile, $70, perhaps with an SFX PSU such as <b>SilverStone ST45SF SST-ST45SF</b> 450W SFX PSU, $70, instead of an ATX PSU (to avoid conflict with a larger optical drive).</li>
<li><b>Antec MicroFusion Remote 350</b> microATX, low-profile, with a LCD/IR receiver/remote, $170. Includes a 350W PSU.</li>
<li><b>Lian Li PC-C37B MUSE</b> microATX, low-profile, $128.</li>
<li><b>Moneual MonCaso312</b> microATX, low-profile, with an IR receiver/remote, $240.</li>
</ul><br>
from top left to bottom right in the figure.<br><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_Cases_LowProfile.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<b>Full-Height Cases</b><br><ul><li><b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 1000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $70.</li>
<li><b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li><b>Antec Fusion Remote Black</b> microATX, with a LCD/IR receiver/remote, $140.</li>
<li><b>Lian Li PC-C50</b> microATX, $179. Supports a 250mm (9.8 in) long graphics card and a 120mm tall CPU cooler.</li>
<li><b>LUXA2 LM200</b> microATX, with a VFD/IR receiver/remote, $320.</li>
<li><b>LUXA2 LM200 Touch</b> microATX, with a 7″ touch screen/IR receiver/remote, $510.</li>
</ul><br>
from top left to bottom right in the figure.<br><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_Cases_FullHeight.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
I will use APEX DM-387″ the budget systems, nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B in the low-end systems, Antec Fusion Remote Black in the mid-range systems, Lian Li PC-C50 in the high-end systems and LUXA2 LM200 Touch in the premium systems.
 

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<span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Budget System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br>
Here are systems at as low cost as possible, but with good performance of HD and SD video playback. You can always add a better discrete graphics card later such as <b>PowerColor AX5450 512MK3-SH</b> Radeon HD 5450 GDDR3 512MB, $40.<br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel (iGPU)</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b><br><br>
The system uses the older chipset G41/ICH7 with integrated graphics. The integrated graphics GMA X4500 does not support hardware decode acceleration for HD video codecs, hence you may see high CPU usage, 60%--70%. Otherwise it is the same as GMA X4500 HD (the GPU integrated in G45) in video and audio performance. In particular video post-processing is very good and HDMI audio supports multichannel LPCM.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Celeron E3400</b> 2.60GHz 1MB L2 65W LGA775, $50.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS P5G41C-M</b> LGA775 Intel G41/ICH7 chipsets microATX, $62.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>Kingston ValueRAM KVR1333D3N9K2/2G</b> DDR3-1333 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $30.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: Intel GMA X4500 (integrated in the chipset), $0.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ</b> 500GB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $45.</li>
<li>PSU: FlexATX 275W PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>APEX DM-387</b> microATX, low-profile, $40.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$227</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_Budget_Intel_iGPU.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD (iGPU)</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b><br><br>
A system as cheap as possible with the current AMD iGPU HD 4250 is here. Hardware video decode acceleration is supported. But HDMI audio is limited to stereo LPCM, Dolby Digital and DTS.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X2 255 ADX255OCGQBOX/ADX255OCGMBOX</b> 3.1GHz 65W AM3, $63.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>Foxconn A88GMV</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB710 chipsets ATX, $70.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>Kingston ValueRAM KVR1333D3N9K2/2G</b> DDR3-1333 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $30.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: Radeon HD 4250 (integrated in the chipset), $0.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ</b> 500GB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $45.</li>
<li>PSU: FlexATX 275W PSU (included in the case), $0.</li>
<li>Case: <b>APEX DM-387</b> microATX, low-profile, $40.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$248</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_Budget_AMD_iGPU.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 

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<span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Low-End System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel (iGPU)</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b><br><br>
The Intel Core i3 system in the previous mid-range system section is now in the low-end system section. The integrated GPU is overall very good with a few issues such as non-support for 23.976Hz refresh rate and not so good support by free and open-source video codecs.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASRock H55M/USB3 R2.0</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset microATX, $87. An alternative is <b>GIGABYTE GA-H55M-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset microATX, $110 (supporting one more USB 3.0 and IEEE 1394).</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $53.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: Intel HD Graphics (integrated in the chipset), $0.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-380 Bronze</b>, $53.</li>
<li>Case: <b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$431</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_LowEnd_Intel_iGPU.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> Instead of a pricey Core i3 processor and a H55 motherboard, you can use a much cheaper Intel Celeron processor and a motherboard with older chipsets, but add a better discrete graphics card for overall better video playback performance at a lower cost.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Celeron E3400</b> 2.60GHz 1MB L2 65W LGA775, $50.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS P5G41C-M</b> LGA775 Intel G41/ICH7 chipsets microATX, $62.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $53.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: <b>PowerColor AX5450 512MK3-SH</b> Radeon HD 5450 GDDR3 512MB, $40.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-380 Bronze</b>, $53.</li>
<li>Case: <b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$382</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_LowEnd_Intel.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD (iGPU)</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> If you want the current AMD iGPU, here is such a system.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X2 255 ADX255OCGQBOX/ADX255OCGMBOX</b> 3.1GHz 65W AM3, $63.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASRock 880GMH/USB3</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB710 chipsets microATX, $82. An alternative is <b>GIGABYTE GA-880GMA-UD2H</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB850 chipsets microATX, $90 (supporting SATA 6Gb/s and IEEE 1394).</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $53.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: Radeon HD 4250 (integrated in the chipset), $0.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-380 Bronze</b>, $53.</li>
<li>Case: <b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$375</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_LowEnd_AMD_iGPU.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> AMD iGPU is somewhat limited in today's standard. If you want to add a discrete graphics card, then you could choose a cheaper motherboard whose onboard video is inferior but you won't use anyway.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X2 255 ADX255OCGQBOX/ADX255OCGMBOX</b> 3.1GHz 65W AM3, $63.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS M4A78LT-M</b> AM3 AMD 760G/SB710 chipsets microATX, $68.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $53.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: <b>PowerColor AX5450 512MK3-SH</b> Radeon HD 5450 GDDR3 512MB, $40.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-380 Bronze</b>, $53.</li>
<li>Case: <b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$401</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_LowEnd_AMD.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel for 3D</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> If you are interested in 3D video, you will have to select the graphics card as well as CPU carefully.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASRock H55M/USB3 R2.0</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset microATX, $87. An alternative is <b>GIGABYTE GA-H55M-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset microATX, $110 (supporting one more USB 3.0 and IEEE 1394).</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $53.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: <b>EVGA 01G-P3-1430-LR</b> GeForce GT 430 DDR3 1GB low-profile, $70.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-380 Bronze</b>, $53.</li>
<li>Case: <b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$501</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_LowEnd_Intel_for_3D.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD for 3D</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>Summary</b> The AMD equivalent of the above system.<br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X3 450 ADX450WFGMBOX</b> 3.2GHz 95W AM3, $80.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: <b>Cooler Master Vortex Plus RR-VTPS-28PK-R1</b>, $27.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>ASUS M4A78LT-M</b> AM3 AMD 760G/SB710 chipsets microATX, $68.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $53.</li>
<li>Graphics Card: <b>EVGA 01G-P3-1430-LR</b> GeForce GT 430 DDR3 1GB low-profile, $70.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-380 Bronze</b>, $53.</li>
<li>Case: <b>nMEDIAPC HTPC 5000B</b> microATX, with a card reader, $65.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span><b>$475</b></span></li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_LowEnd_AMD_for_3D.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 

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<span style="font-size:larger;"><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Mid-Range System</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>Intel</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Core i3-540</b> 3.06GHz 73W LGA1156, $114.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: Stock cooler, $0.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>GIGABYTE GA-H57M-USB3</b> LGA1156 Intel H57 chipset microATX, $121. If you want a PCI Express x1 slot, you can choose <b>ASRock H55M Pro</b> LGA1156 Intel H55 chipset microATX, $95, but this lacks USB 3.0.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $60.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100287VGAL (VGA) or 100287L (DisplayPort)</b> HD 5670 GDDR5 512MB , $80.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>EVGA 01G-P3-1430-LR</b> GeForce GT 430 DDR3 1GB low-profile, $70.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-430 Bronze</b>, $60. An alternative is <b>Corsair VX450W CMPSU-450VX</b> 450W, $60.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec Fusion Remote Black</b> microATX, with a LCD/IR receiver/remote, $140.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$634</b></span> for AMD, <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$624</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_MidRange_Intel.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
<span><span style="color:#FF0000;"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><b><a>AMD</a></b></span></span></span><br><br><b>System</b><br><ul><li>CPU: <b>Athlon II X4 640 ADX640WFGMBOX</b> 3.0GHz 95W AM3, $100.</li>
<li>CPU Cooler: <b>Cooler Master Vortex Plus RR-VTPS-28PK-R1</b>, $27.</li>
<li>Motherboard: <b>GIGABYTE GA-880GMA-UD2H</b> AM3 AMD 880G/SB850 chipsets microATX, $90.</li>
<li>Memory: <b>G.SKILL F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL</b> Ripjaws DDR3-1600 CL9 2 x 2GB Kit, $60.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (AMD): <b>Sapphire 100287VGAL (VGA) or 100287L (DisplayPort)</b> HD 5670 GDDR5 512MB , $80.</li>
<li>Graphics Card (NVIDIA): <b>EVGA 01G-P3-1430-LR</b> GeForce GT 430 DDR3 1GB low-profile, $70.</li>
<li>HDD: <b>Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ</b> 1TB SATA 3.0Gbps 7200 RPM, $59.</li>
<li>PSU: <b>Seasonic S12II-430 Bronze</b>, $60. An alternative is <b>Corsair VX450W CMPSU-450VX</b> 450W, $55.</li>
<li>Case: <b>Antec Fusion Remote Black</b> microATX, with a LCD/IR receiver/remote, $140.</li>
<li>Total Cost: <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$616</b></span> for AMD, <span style="color:#008000;"><b>$606</b></span> for NVIDIA</li>
</ul><blockquote><p><img alt="" src="http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq146/renethx/Buyers_Guide_10-12/0_MicroATX_MidRange_AMD.png" style="border:0px solid;"></p></blockquote>
 
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