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@legierk

As you can see Mike, @mthomas47 has a lot more knowledge than me when it come to Sub/s and Audyssey:)

In my previous post to you (1176). I was assuming you had the Audyissey Multi-EQ as quote below from my post;
"The only thing I can think about, if you use a Audissey Multi-EQ. It has a lot less filters capacity than one like XT32.
Just a shot in the dark, since less filters would result in a lesser refinement of the sub response."

Since you do have the XT32, I would re-read Mike previous posts (1178 & 1180) a few times. And taking a look at those sections he mention.
Lots of good information's!
While I knew the XT32 is a very elaborate calibration system, it never cross my mind, that you ran the REW before the Audyissey calibration system.


Ray

P.S. added a couple quick link for you for those sections, to find them faster.
And did not bother quoting the Cliff notes, since they are at the very beginning of the Guide;
Section II: Audio System Calibration and Subwoofer Levels:
VIII-E: Subwoofer Placement in a Room:
 

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@legierk

As you can see Mike, @mthomas47 has a lot more knowledge than me when it come to Sub/s and Audyssey:)

In my previous post to you (1176). I was assuming you had the Audyissey Multi-EQ as quote below from my post;
"The only thing I can think about, if you use a Audissey Multi-EQ. It has a lot less filters capacity than one like XT32.
Just a shot in the dark, since less filters would result in a lesser refinement of the sub response."

Since you do have the XT32, I would re-read Mike previous posts (1178 & 1180) a few times. And taking a look at those sections he mention.
Lots of good information's!
While I knew the XT32 is a very elaborate calibration system, it never cross my mind, that you ran the REW before the Audyissey calibration system.


Ray

P.S. added a couple quick link for you for those sections, to find them faster.
And did not bother quoting the Cliff notes, since they are at the very beginning of the Guide;
Section II: Audio System Calibration and Subwoofer Levels:
VIII-E: Subwoofer Placement in a Room:


Thanks Darth, but we are all learning from each other, all of the time! Ed Mullen helped me to understand something better the other day, and not for the first time. I would like to think that I learn something new or understand something better, about this hobby of ours, every week. :)
 

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Glad to see Mike and I did help you:D
And also very glad you took the time, to reply with your finding and having your rattle problem solve:D

I have learn a lot from Mike Guide, and still learning as I go through life from him and some others.
As you said yourself, helping your self is the best way to learn. And Thank You for mention-it:)

If in the future you decide to move your sub/s into a different position, and have a new rattle problem.
Here's few things that have learn for my room, in case you might need this info.

- The first thing I do, is to repeat the scene of a movie/ or the test disk frequency where it occur.
Walk around the room where it seem to come from
Put some pressure on the wall/ceiling until, I found the culprit
If a rattle stop, mark the spot and put a dry wall screw to see if it fix the problem (if it did, just putty and paint is left do do).
-If all fail, you need to think outside the box:eek:
I once thought it was my Tower left woofer was the culprit, turn out it was a door knob near by. That the screws got loose.
Another one, was a movie poster. While I thought it Left surround speaker mount.

As you see, finding a rattling problem. Can be sometime easy, and other time very difficult to pin point:eek:


Ray
Update to my rattling issue,I located the main culprit,it was the Hihat light a few feet from the corner where the sub is. The ring of the light had enough play in it that it rattled when I watched movies at the "She's not home" levels 😂. The wall adjacent to the sub also had a vibration noise that I was able to locate and mark in order to put a few sheetrock screws in this week. I used the John Wick Club Scene to play over and over until I found the culprits. Than I used the Black Hole scene from Interstellar,everything sounds much better now,only noise is the wall that needs extra screws but that is not that bad. Almost done with chasing rattles!
 

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Especially in this thread! I've learned and came to understand a lot since I've stumbled upon this thread!
+1
I have learn more since that thread existed, than a lot of years in audio:)

Thanks Darth, but we are all learning from each other, all of the time! Ed Mullen helped me to understand something better the other day, and not for the first time. I would like to think that I learn something new or understand something better, about this hobby of ours, every week. :)
So true Mike:)
And also notice that you and I, and some others. Are not afraid to say, we did learn something new from another member.
In my book, a very good quality in life.


Ray
 

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Update to my rattling issue,I located the main culprit,it was the Hihat light a few feet from the corner where the sub is. The ring of the light had enough play in it that it rattled when I watched movies at the "She's not home" levels 😂. The wall adjacent to the sub also had a vibration noise that I was able to locate and mark in order to put a few sheetrock screws in this week. I used the John Wick Club Scene to play over and over until I found the culprits. Than I used the Black Hole scene from Interstellar,everything sounds much better now,only noise is the wall that needs extra screws but that is not that bad. Almost done with chasing rattles!
I bet you a nickel ($0.05, in Canada), this one was fun to figure out:eek::)

Just one more word of advice.
Make sure before putting those sheetrock screws, that some pressure remedy the problem for sure.
Since once done, extra screws won't hurt. But will involve some putty, and paint matching your existing one.


Ray
 

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I bet you a nickel ($0.05, in Canada), this one was fun to figure out:eek::)

Just one more word of advice.
Make sure before putting those sheetrock screws, that some pressure remedy the problem for sure.
Since once done, extra screws won't hurt. But will involve some putty, and paint matching your existing one.


Ray
I already put pressure on the wall while the scene was playing and the noise stopped, so its just a matter of putting a few screws in a wall. Maybe tomorrow after work but definitely by the end of the week.
 
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I ended up using 8 filters per sub, balanced the outputs, and the right sub ended up being 180 out of phase for best freq response.
Since you are using XT32 with SubEQ HT, there is no need to adjust phase. Audyssey will adjust the distance setting for each sub so that they are in-phase.


Here's where it gets interesting. I turned Audyssey off, and re-ran the Left and Right speakers with the subs just to see if anything had changed. Audyssey did have me change to sub outputs to level match them but it ended up being no more than 2db on the right sub. Other than that, the aforementioned crossover changed from 100hz to 90hz and the mic position changed maybe 2 inches.
Your sub distance settings are probably all out of whack because you had one sub inverted. Set both subs to "0" phase, bypass all EQ filters, re-run Audyssey and measure. Post up those measurements.
 

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Since you are using XT32 with SubEQ HT, there is no need to adjust phase. Audyssey will adjust the distance setting for each sub so that they are in-phase.

Your sub distance settings are probably all out of whack because you had one sub inverted. Set both subs to "0" phase, bypass all EQ filters, re-run Audyssey and measure. Post up those measurements.
Thanks Alan. Yep, I am gonna bypass (disable) PEQ for subs and re-run Audyssey. THEN I will break out REW and check on things. It will most likely be towards the weekend. My days are pretty full. Thanks for the continued assistance. Keith
 

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If in the future you decide to move your sub/s into a different position, and have a new rattle problem.
Here's few things that have learn for my room, in case you might need this info.

- The first thing I do, is to repeat the scene of a movie/ or the test disk frequency where it occur.
Walk around the room where it seem to come from
REW's generator function is very useful for this.
Michael
 

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Well it has been almost 2 weeks, so sorry I have been away (I really thought there would have been many more posts since I last visited). Last weekend, I did a recal on the living room setup. This time, however, I ran Audyssey FIRST. Of course, I first bypassed all PEQ and levels in the subs' DSP. Audyssey did it's thing, and everything sounded pretty darn good. Then I broke out REW to see what was happening, and the subs were really flat from 80hz (the cutoff that I set after Audyssey had set the mains at 40hz) to 40hz on the subs. At about 40hz, they rolled off gently, with a bump at 30hz. I then used the PEQ to eq both subs together to flatten it out from 40hz - 20hz. Now the subs are really flat. I then leveled the Audyssey (AVR) sub levels to -8 each, and recalibrated the subs using REW, and the PEQ level controls. This way, I have "more" room to boost things if need be, although everything is sounding very full and I haven't had the need to raise the levels this past week.

Thanks to everyone here for the tips. I think, after reflection, that I really got used to the bass in the theater room with 4 x 18" ported subs. I was expecting the same level of performance from 2 x 12" sealed subs in the living room, and now I know that that was just unrealistic.
 

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Well it has been almost 2 weeks, so sorry I have been away (I really thought there would have been many more posts since I last visited). Last weekend, I did a recal on the living room setup. This time, however, I ran Audyssey FIRST. Of course, I first bypassed all PEQ and levels in the subs' DSP. Audyssey did it's thing, and everything sounded pretty darn good. Then I broke out REW to see what was happening, and the subs were really flat from 80hz (the cutoff that I set after Audyssey had set the mains at 40hz) to 40hz on the subs. At about 40hz, they rolled off gently, with a bump at 30hz. I then used the PEQ to eq both subs together to flatten it out from 40hz - 20hz. Now the subs are really flat. I then leveled the Audyssey (AVR) sub levels to -8 each, and recalibrated the subs using REW, and the PEQ level controls. This way, I have "more" room to boost things if need be, although everything is sounding very full and I haven't had the need to raise the levels this past week.

Thanks to everyone here for the tips. I think, after reflection, that I really got used to the bass in the theater room with 4 x 18" ported subs. I was expecting the same level of performance from 2 x 12" sealed subs in the living room, and now I know that that was just unrealistic.


You are very welcome, and I'm glad that the subs sound and measure better now! As you say, you have room to boost things if you decide later that you want to.

As you said, two 12" sealed subs are hardly likely to sound or feel exactly the way that four 18" ported subs do, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Depending on the size of the room that the sealed subs are in, the room construction (a suspended wood floor for the sealed subs, and a concrete floor for the ported subs, for instance), and the type of listening you are doing (acoustic music and TV, versus action movies, for instance) they may not need to have as much low-bass SPL, and they may not need to sound or feel the same.

There are a lot of variables that determine our satisfaction level with our subwoofers, in a particular space, for particular types of content. I listed some of them above. I think that you might enjoy having rooms with inherently different potential uses and sound qualities. Large ported subs with reasonably low port tunes will always be capable of much more
 

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I was watching the Cream 2005 concert blu-ray over the weekend with Audyssey engaged, DEQ off, 100Hz crossover, and 6-7 dB of channel level boost on the subs (Marantz AV7704).

This blu-ray has some very potent bass from the kick drums and bass guitar, and I was playing it pretty loud (-5 at the loudest, IIRC). The bass sounded great – impactful and clean, to my ears.

However, I did notice that the subs (Outlaw X12 and LFM-1) were working pretty darn hard – a lot of driver excursion, port output, and some enclosure vibration. I didn’t notice sounds of distress, but the subs definitely seemed like they were working harder than they were previously with my Outlaw 975 pre/pro.

So, this made me wonder about the general impact of SubEQ HT on subwoofer output and headroom. If SubEQ HT is only trying to fix major nulls (and not trying to reduce major peaks) based on the specific room response, seems like this could really tax the subwoofer output and headroom. In my case, the Editor App does show major nulls in the 50-80 Hz range in the sub “before” plot (see screenshot). This, in combination with sub level boost, could really tax one’s sub(s), I would think.

Again, I did not notice any signs of distress – like distortion, chuffing, rattles, etc. However, I wonder if folks have found that their sub(s) run out of steam post SubEQ HT, and whether folks have upgraded to bigger and badder subs because of this.

As a side note, I’ve been contemplating sub upgrades, even before using SubEQ HT with the Marantz 7704. Been wondering how much of an upgrade two 15” PSA V1510DF’s would be over the two 12” Outlaw’s I have. I use this system for 2-channel music and 5.1 concerts, primarily…with some TV and movies sprinkled in, so clean bass with a lot of headroom above 25-30 Hz is more of a priority than sub 25 Hz extension for me.
 

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I was watching the Cream 2005 concert blu-ray over the weekend with Audyssey engaged, DEQ off, 100Hz crossover, and 6-7 dB of channel level boost on the subs (Marantz AV7704).

This blu-ray has some very potent bass from the kick drums and bass guitar, and I was playing it pretty loud (-5 at the loudest, IIRC). The bass sounded great – impactful and clean, to my ears.

However, I did notice that the subs (Outlaw X12 and LFM-1) were working pretty darn hard – a lot of driver excursion, port output, and some enclosure vibration. I didn’t notice sounds of distress, but the subs definitely seemed like they were working harder than they were previously with my Outlaw 975 pre/pro.

So, this made me wonder about the general impact of SubEQ HT on subwoofer output and headroom. If SubEQ HT is only trying to fix major nulls (and not trying to reduce major peaks) based on the specific room response, seems like this could really tax the subwoofer output and headroom. In my case, the Editor App does show major nulls in the 50-80 Hz range in the sub “before” plot (see screenshot). This, in combination with sub level boost, could really tax one’s sub(s), I would think.

Again, I did not notice any signs of distress – like distortion, chuffing, rattles, etc. However, I wonder if folks have found that their sub(s) run out of steam post SubEQ HT, and whether folks have upgraded to bigger and badder subs because of this.

As a side note, I’ve been contemplating sub upgrades, even before using SubEQ HT with the Marantz 7704. Been wondering how much of an upgrade two 15” PSA V1510DF’s would be over the two 12” Outlaw’s I have. I use this system for 2-channel music and 5.1 concerts, primarily…with some TV and movies sprinkled in, so clean bass with a lot of headroom above 25-30 Hz is more of a priority than sub 25 Hz extension for me.
Ah, the memory. I use to have that Outlaw AVP, many years ago:)
I change-it to a Onkyo PRS-886 with Audyssey XP. Nice new AVP, from there I moved to AV8801 then my present AV7702mkII.

From your screenshot, it does look like SubEQ on your Marantz did some boost. Look like around +5dB, for the 50-80Hz to make the response flatter.
If it is the case, playing at -5dB from refence level with a boost of 6-7dB. It would make your subs play very hard.
On the good side, you did not heard any stress level.
So no bottom out, meaning no damage:)

In my opinion, getting two 15" subs. Would be a step forward from your 12"
To play at those type of volume.

Since Mike always reply on this thread, he can correct me or add new information.


Ray
 

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I was watching the Cream 2005 concert blu-ray over the weekend with Audyssey engaged, DEQ off, 100Hz crossover, and 6-7 dB of channel level boost on the subs (Marantz AV7704).

This blu-ray has some very potent bass from the kick drums and bass guitar, and I was playing it pretty loud (-5 at the loudest, IIRC). The bass sounded great – impactful and clean, to my ears.

However, I did notice that the subs (Outlaw X12 and LFM-1) were working pretty darn hard – a lot of driver excursion, port output, and some enclosure vibration. I didn’t notice sounds of distress, but the subs definitely seemed like they were working harder than they were previously with my Outlaw 975 pre/pro.

So, this made me wonder about the general impact of SubEQ HT on subwoofer output and headroom. If SubEQ HT is only trying to fix major nulls (and not trying to reduce major peaks) based on the specific room response, seems like this could really tax the subwoofer output and headroom. In my case, the Editor App does show major nulls in the 50-80 Hz range in the sub “before” plot (see screenshot). This, in combination with sub level boost, could really tax one’s sub(s), I would think.

Again, I did not notice any signs of distress – like distortion, chuffing, rattles, etc. However, I wonder if folks have found that their sub(s) run out of steam post SubEQ HT, and whether folks have upgraded to bigger and badder subs because of this.

As a side note, I’ve been contemplating sub upgrades, even before using SubEQ HT with the Marantz 7704. Been wondering how much of an upgrade two 15” PSA V1510DF’s would be over the two 12” Outlaw’s I have. I use this system for 2-channel music and 5.1 concerts, primarily…with some TV and movies sprinkled in, so clean bass with a lot of headroom above 25-30 Hz is more of a priority than sub 25 Hz extension for me.

Hi,

First, I think it's a good call to believe that Audyssey can reduce your overall headroom somewhat, depending on how much it is pulling-up dips, compared to pulling down peaks. Audyssey attempts to compensate for that by allowing its software to pull-down peaks by up to 20db, but it can only pull-up dips by a maximum of 9db. Most rooms have both peaks and dips in the frequency response, so the loss of headroom from pulling-up dips, and the gain in headroom from pulling-down peaks, tends to even out. In your case, though, they may not even out, if you don't have many frequencies peaking to start with.

Second, although the graphs that you see aren't totally accurate (for instance, they only depict what Audyssey was trying to do, not what it actually did) they do indicate some issues that might be ameliorated with better subwoofer placement. Fortunately, fixing dips in the 40Hz to 80Hz range doesn't consume as much headroom, as fixing even lower dips would, but you might get better results if you experiment a bit more with sub placement and test the results with Audyssey calibrations.

Third, your volume level is pretty high. Combined with the sub boost you are using, you are putting a good bit of demand on your subs. Remember to keep your trim levels well in the negative range (say about -5) and use your sub gains to add most of your subwoofer boost, post-Audyssey. That will help to prevent clipping, which is a form of distortion, but one that might be harder to hear. Section II of the Guide explains gain/trim relationships in detail.

I definitely think that a couple of PSA V1510's would be a significant upgrade for the content and preferences you describe. The current line of PSA ported subs roll-off a little faster below 20Hz than some other subs do, but they are designed to have a lot of >25Hz SPL. I think that you would enjoy the upgrade, but remember that subwoofer placement is what causes the dips you are seeing in the before graph, and you would still want to maximize your pre-Audyssey response, even with the new subwoofers.

This is just something to experiment with. If you get serious about it, you might want to invest in a calibrated UMIK-1 and download REW. It's free, but takes a little time and effort to learn. You might, for instance, want to change the phase on one of your subs, in an effort to reduce cancellation currently occurring in the 40Hz to 80Hz range. But, I'm not sure that you will be able to do that successfully by ear, or just with an SPL meter. You can try though, by listening/measuring the volume of some test tones in that range, while adjusting the phase control on just one of your subs.

I think that trying to reduce the potentially large area of depression in your frequency response, between 40hz and 80Hz, will be helpful regardless of which subs you have, although the PSA subs will absolutely have a lot more native volume in that range than your Outlaw subs have. :)

Regards,
Mike
 

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As a side note, I’ve been contemplating sub upgrades, even before using SubEQ HT with the Marantz 7704. Been wondering how much of an upgrade two 15” PSA V1510DF’s would be over the two 12” Outlaw’s I have. I use this system for 2-channel music and 5.1 concerts, primarily…with some TV and movies sprinkled in, so clean bass with a lot of headroom above 25-30 Hz is more of a priority than sub 25 Hz extension for me.
Since you are specifically looking for subs to play music, you may want to consider Rythmik. Known for low distortion, articulate sound. Slightly different sound signature than PSA, from what I understand, but can't go wrong either way.
http://www.rythmikaudio.com/FVX15.html
http://www.rythmikaudio.com/FV15HP.html
 
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darthray, mthomas47, and drh3b, thanks for the input.

Regarding phase adjustment to reduce cancellation, I thought that SubEQ HT was supposed to set the delay optimally. If I were to adjust phase on one sub 180 degrees (these subs only have 0/180 settings) prior to Audyssey calibration, wouldn’t SubEQ HT readjust the delay based on what it’s trying to achieve?

One thing I could try is to flip 1 sub to 180 degrees phase, rerun Audyssey, and see if the before plot is any better/different.

Regarding sub positioning, I am very limited in this room.

Current sub locations are in the front of the room – orange and green circles in the first pic. Note that picture is old and right before I added the second sub. Currently, The Outlaw X-12 is in the orange circle and the Outlaw LFM-1 is in the green circle.

My only 2 other placement options are:

1) Move both subs to the side walls, somewhat near the midpoints of the room, although not perfectly symmetrical – yellow and blue circles in the second pic. Running a sub cable to the blue circle would be a pain.

2) Or, keep one sub in one of the current orange or green front positions and move the other to one of the side wall blue or yellow circles.

I do have some concern that moving the subs to the side walls, closer to the couch, could cause localization for music.

Also, the couch is about at the midpoint of the room, which I believe is also less than ideal, regardless of sub positioning.

So, it this room, I feel like I have some real sub placement limitations and compromises, so that is why I was thinking that bigger subs with more headroom, combined with SubEQ HT equalization, might be a viable upgrade path forward.
 

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darthray, mthomas47, and drh3b, thanks for the input.

Regarding phase adjustment to reduce cancellation, I thought that SubEQ HT was supposed to set the delay optimally. If I were to adjust phase on one sub 180 degrees (these subs only have 0/180 settings) prior to Audyssey calibration, wouldn’t SubEQ HT readjust the delay based on what it’s trying to achieve?

One thing I could try is to flip 1 sub to 180 degrees phase, rerun Audyssey, and see if the before plot is any better/different.

Regarding sub positioning, I am very limited in this room.

Current sub locations are in the front of the room – orange and green circles in the first pic. Note that picture is old and right before I added the second sub. Currently, The Outlaw X-12 is in the orange circle and the Outlaw LFM-1 is in the green circle.

My only 2 other placement options are:

1) Move both subs to the side walls, somewhat near the midpoints of the room, although not perfectly symmetrical – yellow and blue circles in the second pic. Running a sub cable to the blue circle would be a pain.

2) Or, keep one sub in one of the current orange or green front positions and move the other to one of the side wall blue or yellow circles.

I do have some concern that moving the subs to the side walls, closer to the couch, could cause localization for music.

Also, the couch is about at the midpoint of the room, which I believe is also less than ideal, regardless of sub positioning.

So, it this room, I feel like I have some real sub placement limitations and compromises, so that is why I was thinking that bigger subs with more headroom, combined with SubEQ HT equalization, might be a viable upgrade path forward.


You are very welcome! Let's take some of those issues one at a time. First, with respect to room modes, your couch is not actually at the midpoint of the room. Some bass will escape to the space beyond your room, but the primary room modes are determined by the four walls which enclose the space, and not by the openings to other spaces. So, your couch location is not a principle factor in the mid-bass cancellation, in my opinion. If I'm right, that's a good thing, because that's a harder thing to fix!

FWIW, I think that you will get better overall sound quality, if you move your couch about a foot away from the wall, and put a painting or something absorbent on the wall behind the couch. That will help your mid-range and treble sound quality. Reading Section I of the Guide will help you to understand why that would be helpful, and you will also see some suggestions in that section about running a better Audyssey calibration. The bare wall directly behind your couch is a factor in what you hear, and in how Audyssey performs.

Second, I would experiment with other subwoofer locations before running Audyssey, and I would experiment with changing the phase on one of the subs after running Audyssey. It is important to understand that there is a degree of trial-and-error in all of this. You observe a large area of cancellation and try different methods of fixing it, without knowing in advance whether you can find physical locations which will work better. And, you won't know whether you will have localization either, until you try the placement you mentioned. Especially, with more than one sub in a room, nearfield placement of a sub can sometimes work very well.

The same thing applies to making changes in the phase on one of the subs. You just have to experiment to see if it helps. Audyssey sets the distance for each sub separately, but it EQ's the two subs together, based on their combined response. Where you know that you have a large area of cancellation, especially in a portion of the frequency range which is very important to you, you can experiment with a phase adjustment, or a distance adjustment for that matter, to see if it helps. The suggestions I am making are not just random ones, but I still can't tell you which subwoofer locations will work best, or whether a post-Audyssey phase adjustment will be helpful. You still have to experiment to find out.

I think that having better subs with more mid-bass headroom, does represent a good path forward. But, more headroom won't, by itself, fix a null. If the null remains after your Audyssey calibration, the new subwoofers will be able to play all frequencies louder than the current ones could, but that portion of the frequency range, which dips down, will still play softer than the rest of the frequency range played by the subs.

If Audyssey is fixing the problem sufficiently that you aren't aware of any loss of SPL in the mid-bass range (40Hz to 80Hz, in this case), then more capable subwoofers will absolutely give you more of what you want, and they won't have to work as hard to do it. In that case, I think that the two PSA subwoofers would be a great choice, because they are especially strong in the range you care most about. And, I would also expect you to notice an overall improvement in your bass sound quality with better subs.

If however, there is an ongoing issue in the 40Hz to 80Hz range that you are aware of, then some experimentation may be helpful to you, either with your current subwoofers, or with the new ones. That's really all I was saying.

We all decide for ourselves how much experimentation is enough. Some people really like to tinker with subwoofer placement, and with other things including measurements, and many others just like to put subwoofers where they seem to fit and work fairly well. I think that there is no absolute right or wrong answer to any of this--just the answer that your own sense of curiosity, and/or level of satisfaction, dictates. :)

Regards,
Mike
 

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You are very welcome! Let's take some of those issues one at a time. First, with respect to room modes, your couch is not actually at the midpoint of the room. Some bass will escape to the space beyond your room, but the primary room modes are determined by the four walls which enclose the space, and not by the openings to other spaces. So, your couch location is not a principle factor in the mid-bass cancellation, in my opinion. If I'm right, that's a good thing, because that's a harder thing to fix!

FWIW, I think that you will get better overall sound quality, if you move your couch about a foot away from the wall, and put a painting or something absorbent on the wall behind the couch. That will help your mid-range and treble sound quality. Reading Section I of the Guide will help you to understand why that would be helpful, and you will also see some suggestions in that section about running a better Audyssey calibration. The bare wall directly behind your couch is a factor in what you hear, and in how Audyssey performs.
Mike
Mike, thanks!

Might be hard to tell from the pic, but there is an half-wall behind the couch and a walk-though into a bar area that is a little smaller than the main viewing area. Do you think that the bar area is not a factor in room modes because it is not totally open to the main viewing area? If so, you are right, that would be a good thing.

Regarding the half-wall behind the couch, I do put pillows on top of the couch back when listening and when running Audyssey, in order to reduce reflections. Currently, I am limiting correction to 350 Hz with the Editor App, BTW.

I get what you are saying regarding experimenting with sub phase and locations, regardless of the make and model.


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