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Discussion Starter #21
Well, I didn't really check. I have two 950w in the bottom of my server rack so I figured that would be plenty. One is solely for a mac pro server and the other runs drive bays, hub, modem and I think I plugged the PJ into the one that just powered the drives and stuff. I think my Benq 1070 is 240 watts. My ups specs say 17.5 mins with 475 watt load. And I'm sure I'm under that with everything hooked up. I've got a small UPS for AVR it's 300 watt runs for 1min, it just has one battery. My little UPS 300 watt, that would be really close. I'd want something in the 5 min. range at least.

Mine don't make any noise until the batteries need replaced and then it's quite irritating when the alarm is going off. Sounds like an angry cricket back there. The fan from my 24 port hub is the only thing I hear.
Yeah, I assumed UPSs were silent (other than when the power goes out, at which point they're presumably beeping to get your attention, plus maybe a fan spins up to cool the batteries?). But some reviews seem to suggest UPSs can produce noise during regular operation?

I'm going to have my equipment rack in the room, but I do have the option of putting my UPS in a neighboring closet.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I use the Midlite inlet in several locations of my home to extend power down to my equipment racks and power conditioners. I do not use a UPS as we have extremely stable power in my home, but I do want to get clean power to everything if I can. The inlets are extremely overpriced, but still the best value I have seen. There is a clear market for someone to make a $10 basic inlet, but the demand may not support that price structure.

Anyway, easy enough to find and buy the Midlite inlet from any number of stores both physical and online.
Agreed, it's a great product but overpriced.

Relatedly, when the power is on, do UPSs make any noise? I'm trying to figure out whether it's worth locating the inlet for my UPS in a neighboring closet. My equipment rack will be in the main room.
 

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Mine is very quiet and is in the base of the rack. The back side of them is covered in female outlets and you will want all the equipment in the rack to plug in. Based on that the logical place is in the rack.

Some of the office type units years ago were isolation 120/120 transformers setups and they made a God awful 60 cycle hum. I don't think any of the new ones made for home theater are like that and the fans on mine are as quiet as my laptop. I haven't looked for one in a long time but I thought they gave a dB spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Mine is very quiet and is in the base of the rack. The back side of them is covered in female outlets and you will want all the equipment in the rack to plug in. Based on that the logical place is in the rack.

Some of the office type units years ago were isolation 120/120 transformers setups and they made a God awful 60 cycle hum. I don't think any of the new ones made for home theater are like that and the fans on mine are as quiet as my laptop. I haven't looked for one in a long time but I thought they gave a dB spec.
Thanks! My thinking was that only the projector would be plugged in, but you're right, if other equipment gets plugged in then it would need to be next to the rack.

I tried to find a db spec for the Cyberpower units that Costco sells but couldn't find it. But in regular operation, why would any db be produced? I suppose if the way these work is that the batteries are providing power, and continually being recharged, then maybe a fan needs to continually run to cool the batteries?
 

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Thanks! My thinking was that only the projector would be plugged in, but you're right, if other equipment gets plugged in then it would need to be next to the rack.

I tried to find a db spec for the Cyberpower units that Costco sells but couldn't find it. But in regular operation, why would any db be produced? I suppose if the way these work is that the batteries are providing power, and continually being recharged, then maybe a fan needs to continually run to cool the batteries?
Yep all electronics produce heat and to design a run hot device everything has to be upsized = cost. Fans are a lot cheaper in the long run and size is smaller. These things are designed to be used with home electronics so they are not going to make them loud if they can help it. Just like projectors some are smaller and louder like business projectors. Mine is an older APC UPS. I really don’t know about other brands, but I find Google to be my friend and my guess is if you type in the make and model and noise level you will find something.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Yep all electronics produce heat and to design a run hot device everything has to be upsized = cost. Fans are a lot cheaper in the long run and size is smaller. These things are designed to be used with home electronics so they are not going to make them loud if they can help it. Just like projectors some are smaller and louder like business projectors. Mine is an older APC UPS. I really don’t know about other brands, but I find Google to be my friend and my guess is if you type in the make and model and noise level you will find something.
Yeah, I did a bunch of googling with search terms like db, noise, quiet, etc. and struck out.

@BIGmouthinDC, if I recall correctly you put your UPS that protects your projector in a neighboring room/closet, was this because of noise and/or heat?
 

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Yeah, I did a bunch of googling with search terms like db, noise, quiet, etc. and struck out.

@BIGmouthinDC, if I recall correctly you put your UPS that protects your projector in a neighboring room/closet, was this because of noise and/or heat?
Mine is in a DIY shelves/rack that has a full open front and sits slightly in front of my seat and to my left about 4’ from my ears.

In a closed up rack with say a glass door you will trap heat and then need something bigger to pull air thru the rack and some people put those fans in another area outside the theater.

I have a large old Carver amp I power my subs off of. It is by far my biggest heat producer in the room besides the projector. I wired up a couple small computer fans to help it out and I have another on my AVR. The UPS has its fans and the projector has a couple fans. If the movie goes totally dead of audio I can hear some fan noise but we kind of just learned to block it out. We play our audio up pretty good at theater levels and it more than covers any background. The furnace kicking on as an example is more dBs.
We all have different thresholds and some have better ears than others. For me it is nowhere as distracting as going to a commercial theater and putting up with other peoples sounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Mine is in a DIY shelves/rack that has a full open front and sits slightly in front of my seat and to my left about 4’ from my ears.

In a closed up rack with say a glass door you will trap heat and then need something bigger to pull air thru the rack and some people put those fans in another area outside the theater.

I have a large old Carver amp I power my subs off of. It is by far my biggest heat producer in the room besides the projector. I wired up a couple small computer fans to help it out and I have another on my AVR. The UPS has its fans and the projector has a couple fans. If the movie goes totally dead of audio I can hear some fan noise but we kind of just learned to block it out. We play our audio up pretty good at theater levels and it more than covers any background. The furnace kicking on as an example is more dBs.
We all have different thresholds and some have better ears than others. For me it is nowhere as distracting as going to a commercial theater and putting up with other peoples sounds.
Thanks! Just to be clear, the UPS runs fans even when utility power is working? If that's true, then I guess it's a question of how well engineered it is to limit the decibels produced.

With my current setup, I do have the projector with fan overhead. I find that somewhat distracting, but not enough to build some kind of elaborate, ventilated hushbox for it. When playing Bluray discs, there's that noise also, slightly distracting during quiet/silent scenes.
 

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Nice. What's going on with the cutouts in that recessed area?
Those are smurf tubes going all over the theater and in to the attic - one to the projector, one to the ceiling atmos channels, one to the rear wall for subs and one to the front wall for the baffle wall, etc. I have attic access right there as well that allows me to run wires from the smurf tubes shown here to other smaller smurf tubes run throughout the rest of the theater and the rest of the house. The "Smurf tube" in this instance is 2" Carlon resi-gaurd flexible conduit - Carlon SCJ4X1C-50 RESI GUARD CONDUIT 2-Inch 50 feet - Conduit Mounts - Amazon.com

Regarding the UPS - many are near silent so long as they are not the online variety. Those are continuously running and the outputs are being filtered and run through the battery circuitry. Offline and line-interactive UPSs are typically quieter until they switch to the battery or when they are charging after having been used for backup purposes. Most decent brand offline and line-interactive UPSs can switch fast enough to protect the projector.

 

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Discussion Starter #31
Those are smurf tubes going all over the theater and in to the attic - one to the projector, one to the ceiling atmos channels, one to the rear wall for subs and one to the front wall for the baffle wall, etc. I have attic access right there as well that allows me to run wires from the smurf tubes shown here to other smaller smurf tubes run throughout the rest of the theater and the rest of the house. The "Smurf tube" in this instance is 2" Carlon resi-gaurd flexible conduit - Carlon SCJ4X1C-50 RESI GUARD CONDUIT 2-Inch 50 feet - Conduit Mounts - Amazon.com

Regarding the UPS - many are near silent so long as they are not the online variety. Those are continuously running and the outputs are being filtered and run through the battery circuitry. Offline and line-interactive UPSs are typically quieter until they switch to the battery or when they are charging after having been used for backup purposes. Most decent brand offline and line-interactive UPSs can switch fast enough to protect the projector.

Re UPS, that makes sense. I suppose the online ones provide the cleanest power, e.g. to sensitive electronics, especially in the first milliseconds when there are brownouts or power outages, at the cost of battery degradation and fan noise. And I can see how with sufficiently sensitive electronics you could have an offline system that switched on near-instantaneously as needed. Line-interactive sounds like it helps regulate the incoming power.
 

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Re UPS, that makes sense. I suppose the online ones provide the cleanest power, e.g. to sensitive electronics, especially in the first milliseconds when there are brownouts or power outages, at the cost of battery degradation and fan noise. And I can see how with sufficiently sensitive electronics you could have an offline system that switched on near-instantaneously as needed. Line-interactive sounds like it helps regulate the incoming power.
Correct. I made the mistake of first buying an online UPS wanting the best filtering and quickly realized the thing is loud as hell and had to go. My rack is also in a conditioned garage space next to the theater so noise isn't a concern from the theater but it was just too loud to even be acceptable in a garage. They are really meant for server rooms where there are countless other fans drowning it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Correct. I made the mistake of first buying an online UPS wanting the best filtering and quickly realized the thing is loud as hell and had to go. My rack is also in a conditioned garage space next to the theater so noise isn't a concern from the theater but it was just too loud to even be acceptable in a garage. They are really meant for server rooms where there are countless other fans drowning it out.
Wow, it was too loud even in another room! I'll bet the power consumption wasn't great, either. Would a UPS like that stay on 24 hours a day or for home theater purposes, would you only turn it on when you turned on the projector?

Actually, I suppose that might apply to any UPS being used for a projector, no need to have it be on when it's not protecting anything. That would presumably make the UPS or at least its batteries last a very long time, because it was only being used occasionally when the theater was being used.

I'm getting the sense that it's fine to locate my inlet for the UPS in my theater room.

I do have the option of putting all my equipment into a neighboring closet, but I've assumed that making the remotes work would be onerous/expensive.
 

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A small UPS meant for desktop PC usage is likely silent and can be in the room with you. I'd do that. These types of UPSs will be 'always on' but basically only filtering the input and will switch to 'turn on' and power the projector in case of a power failure, surge, etc. I would not bother with switching it off when you arent using the projector.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
A small UPS meant for desktop PC usage is likely silent and can be in the room with you. I'd do that. These types of UPSs will be 'always on' but basically only filtering the input and will switch to 'turn on' and power the projector in case of a power failure, surge, etc. I would not bother with switching it off when you arent using the projector.
Interesting. If the projector isn't being used the vast majority of the time, isn't there some logic to switching off the UPS, both to save power and to extend its life?
 

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A small UPS meant for desktop PC usage is likely silent and can be in the room with you. I'd do that.
Interesting. If the projector isn't being used the vast majority of the time, isn't there some logic to switching off the UPS, both to save power and to extend its life?
Not really. Since the UPS still has power the batteries aren't actively being loaded when it's kept on. It's also arguably better to leave it on all the time to ensure the sealed lead acid batteries stay charged. While you may technically wear out the filtering/logic circuitry, these exist to do exactly what you want to do. The SLA batteries do have a finite life and you should expect to replace them every 3 years or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Not really. Since the UPS still has power the batteries aren't actively being loaded when it's kept on. It's also arguably better to leave it on all the time to ensure the sealed lead acid batteries stay charged. While you may technically wear out the filtering/logic circuitry, these exist to do exactly what you want to do. The SLA batteries do have a finite life and you should expect to replace them every 3 years or so.
Makes sense. Thanks for taking the time to educate me, really helpful.
 
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What I have found is when the batteries are working properly there is no great power loss leaving it on. You can keep using it even after the batteries are weak and then it is my opinion they do start sucking power keeping the batteries up.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
What I have found is when the batteries are working properly there is no great power loss leaving it on. You can keep using it even after the batteries are weak and then it is my opinion they do start sucking power keeping the batteries up.
Interesting. I suppose weak batteries hold their charge less well and need more power to stay full.

And I suppose part of the reason it may not extend the life of the UPS much to turn it off when the projector's not being used is that at that time it's not supplying any power, and so it shouldn't be putting much/any wear on the batteries and other components.
 
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Batteries have a shelf life whether you're using them or not. I have two old APC 1400RMNET units, they're over 15 years old still working. The fans just come on when power is lost or charging. There's an alarm that comes on too so the fan noise is mute at that point. You'll be shutting down PJ anyway. Then I have a small one battery APC CS 500 for AVR and stuff. 3 backup and 3 surge ports.
 
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