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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this idea, but not the means to test it. I am thinking that if you split the signal out of the DVD with the 5.1 signal going to two seperate receivers and two set of 5.1 speakers, and run them at the same time.


My thoughts are that it would enhance the surround with more speaker placement, a wider radius for the sweet spot, and twice the power using two receivers.


I don't see why there would be any problems with this, but would it make much of a difference is my question. Is it worth the trouble. You could call it a matrix 10.2.


I don't have the extra equipment around to set up something like this, but if someone else is willing to try, I would like to know the outcome.


Thanks
 

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By splitting the signal you would loose more sound quality then it would be worth. If you want more speakers it would be better to buy amplifier equipment that can handle that many speakers rather then splitting it off at your dvd player. You will end up making it sound worse not better.
 

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Mike, some things to consider:


If ther are any differences in the two signal paths, such as inverse absolute polarity, signal timing delays, different speakers, etc, there will be anomolies that no tweaking can eliminate.


You're better off getting better amplification and speakers. The same money would be better spent this way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, aside from praticallity, is it possible?
 

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Well, sure, anything is possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Maybe instead of using a splitter, on system can use the optical out and the other, a RCA digital out, so as to prevent lost data.


Anyone who has the abilities to do this ought to try and see how it sounds.


Yes I know running a pre/pro is the best case scenario, but some of us don't have the money that others do around here. Heck I don't have two systems to even try it.
 

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Sounds like what you need is an "audio following video distribution amp (AFVDA)", There are several companies that make them such as Extron. If you need or want more info let me know.


Steve
 

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This is quite an intriguing idea since it shows that this person can truly think outside the box. So far, all the answers are right, too. I've got some things to add.


I have wired two systems from one DVD player, passively splitting the optical output. It works fine, but this is for two separate systems in one large room, where the speaker setups are far enough from one another that each one does not contribute to or detract from the imaging and soundstage of the other. So it can be done.


But if you split the optical signal and run it into two identical amps and set them identically and run the signals to two sets of identical speakers, and phase and all else is identical, you will have a problem. You will, of course, have more problems if any ONE of the above factors are not totally identical.


Let's just look at the center speaker. Well, speakers, in this setup. The one person sitting in the one sweet spot, where his (only a guy would do this) nose is equidistant from both speakers, and a line drawn through his brain from one earhole to the other is parallel to the plane of the speakers, will hear the center channel just real fine.


If he turns his head, or leans a bit to the side, then the distance from him to each speaker will change. The more he is off center, the more the change. This distance change will cause the audio from the center speakers to arrive at different times, which means some frequencies will be out of phase with one another from the two speakers. If he stays in the center but asks a friend to join him, sitting next to him, then only one of them will get perfect sound from the center speakers. He needs to hold reeeaaaallllll still for this perfection.


Every other speaker will have to be carefully placed and aimed at that one position to give him sound that does not have phase cancellation dependent on frequency.


Better he should get a bigger amp. Better speakers. Higher resolution video (this will dazzle him and he won't notice the audio so much for a little while).


As for "splitting" by running coax to one amp and optical to another, you have no idea what the phase relationship of the two signals will be. It is likely to be in phase or 180 degrees out of phase, but there could be other problems. If, for instance, there were one millisecond of propagation delay difference between the two signals, you would have a neat comb filter room where 500 Hz signals are 180 degrees out of phase....
 

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I agree the idea doesn't hold much merit, but the two signals mentioned are digital, whether optical or rca or coaxial. No processing and converting to analog happens till they are in the decoding circuit of the amp. An optical splitter would work just fine to two optical inputs, or an optical or hardwire. Just that there is no advantage.
 
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